Experts in container rentals, sales and customization.   |   Let us help you today! 800.686.9114

Panorama City, CA Experts in Container Rental, Sales & Customization

LET US HELP YOU TODAY!
909.341.4736

Service Areas Near Me

Southwest Mobile Storage - Best Mobile Storage & Office Containers In Panorama City, CA

Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers is unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. Panorama City, CA offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

Whether your need is for storage, office space, moving, multi-purpose or custom use, we've got your back. Here's how:

Storage Containers Panorama City, CA

NO MATTER YOUR NEED, WE'VE GOT YOUR BACK.

STORE AT YOUR LOCATION

We bring your storage container to you for convenient, easy access at your home, business or jobsite. Plus, you'll get more choice in storage space and better security, for a fraction of the cost of a pod or add on building, saving money and energy.

STORE AT OUR LOCATION

Not enough room to keep a storage container at your business, home or construction site? No problem - we can store it for you. Plus, you get 70% more space and better security, for a fraction of the cost of public storage units.

CUSTOM STORAGE

Need a permanent storage solution for your business, residence or construction? We sell new and used shipping containers in many sizes with a variety of add-ons. Or customize a container to your specific storage needs with our certified fabrication experts.

LOCAL MOVE

Take your time packing with our moving containers. We'll deliver to your business or home and pick it up whenever you're ready to move. So, you don't have to stress about moving or making multiple trips in one day, like if you rented a moving truck.

LONG-DISTANCE MOVE

Our moving container solutions ensure the long-distance move of your home or business is highly efficient and affordable throughout the southwest. In fact, we usually cost 20%-40% less than full-service movers.

MOVING & STORAGE

We understand move-in and move-out dates might be different. We can store your moving container at our highly secure facilities until you're ready to move to your new home or business location, and you can conveniently access it at any time.

OFFICE USE

Whether you need a workspace, conference room, or other office requirement, our ground-mounted mobile offices meet any and all of your business needs. Plus, it's faster and easier than building additions.

BUSINESS USE

If you need your shipping container to serve multiple uses, such as office-storage combos, breakrooms and even utilities, we've got you covered. We'll modify a custom container to fit your business needs and bring your business to the next level

CUSTOM USE

We'll create a custom container to fit your unique needs anywhere in the US. With our container modification expertise, we make any idea a reality. From pop-up stores to multi-story structures, our unrivaled facilities and fabrication experts do it all.

You'll get your own dedicated storage and container expert to serve as your one point of contact for easy, convenient service you can trust.
With our wide selection of intermodal containers for sale and rent, you'll find exactly what you need, from size, to type and condition.
We maintain our rental fleet to the highest standard - our integrity depends on it.
Our certified, experienced Conex container modification experts have more than 500 years combined experience modifying ISO containers.
All of our containers come with high security dual-locking system for no additional charge, so you can rest assured your stored items stay safe and that you don't have to pay extra for it.
icon-scale
At our unrivaled 90,000 sq ft indoor fabrication facility, ensuring your custom shipping container is made exactly to your specifications.
With our level of service, quality and expertise, you won't find a better value anywhere else.
Our portable offices include lighting and electrical outlets, internet hookups, HVAC and were crafted by our in-house steel container fabrication experts for top-quality construction.

Premium Quality - High Security

With Southwest Mobile Storage, you get much more than a POD or typical Conex box. You also get high security, unparalleled service and unmatched container modification expertise and facilities. No other company offers that much.

Shipping containers and storage containers come in a range of sizes. The most common external lengths are 20ft and 40ft with a width of 8ft. ISO Containers are typically 8ft 6in tall, but high cube containers are 9ft 6in tall. We also have steel containers in a variety of sizes from 10ft long to 45ft long to rent or buy, and we can modify shipping containers into any size you want.

 Rent Storage Containers Panorama City, CA

SMS Mobile Storage Containers have these high quality features:

1/8" thick steel plate bottom side rails
High strength steel supporting cross members
1 1/8" thick hardwood floor with galvanized self-tapping screws
16-gauge corrugated steel walls
16-gauge roof
270-degree swing cargo door(s)
High security dual-locking system*
Spot-grinded, primed & repainted with a beige high-grade water reducible alkyd direct-to-metal enamel*
* Comes standard on all rental units

SMS portable workspace containers have these structural features:

High security window bars, lever & deadbolt set with lock box
Studs & R-19 Insulation covered with wood paneling
1 1/8" marine board floor is covered with a durable single part gray epoxy coating
Dual pane low-E horizontal sliding windows with screens and miniblinds
18 Gauge steel polystyrene core 3-hour fire rated personnel door
All of our workspaces are manufactured in-house and arrive new or restored to factory specifications
Exterior load center operating on 100 Amp single phase 230 Volt power
Light switch, receptacles and 4' light fixtures; all wiring is Romex 12/2
CAT-6 voice and data lines with electrical junction box
HVAC units ranging from 1 ton to 2 ton on rentals; ability to customize up to 10 tons of cooling

Having flexible storage containers options is important, but security is crucial to protect your peace of mind and your possessions.

At Southwest Mobile Storage, we don't believe in leaving things to chance. We want you to rest easy knowing your inventory, documents, tools, equipment and other items are safe 24/7. That is why we equip SMS high-security slide bolt locking systems and lockboxes on our entire fleet of rental freight containers.

EVERY ONE OF OUR MOBILE STORAGE CONTAINERS FOR RENT IN Panorama City, CA, INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING SAFETY MEASURES:

High-security slide-bolt locking system and extra-long lock box, giving you twice the security and peace of mind.
No holes to ensure your rental shipping container is wind and water-tight.
No rust for your safety.
14-gauge corrugated steel for strength and reinforcement.

Contact us to speak with a helpful, friendly representative to better understand our full range of capabilities. We are happy to answer any questions you have, go over pricing and set up a time and place to deliver your Conex box. Our quotes are 100% free and you are under no obligation to pay for your consultation.

COMMERCIAL STORAGE CONTAINERS TO RENT, BUY OR MODIFY IN Panorama City, CA

When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market, like the many caused by the pandemic.

Renting storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. Steel containers with roll up doors make storing and retrieving items faster and easier. Auto repair shops and other businesses that need easy access throughout the workday to secure storage for tools, parts, equipment or supplies find renting shipping containers to be the best solution for their business storage needs. Southwest Mobile Storage has your back.

 Storage Containers For Rent Panorama City, CA

Renting portable offices gives your business more workspace, breakrooms, pop up stores, security booths and more, without the cost and red tape associated with constructing building additions. Plus, a steel storage container fits neatly into one parking space and provides much stronger security than Pods and way more convenience than self-storage units.

If you have a specific need, we can modify shipping containers to build whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's a portable workspace to run your business, like a pop-up container bar, or a durable facility for scientific research, like a container laboratory, or even a container gym, our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification experts got you covered. Our full-time, in-house staff of certified welders, engineers, electricians, carpenters and painters have over 500 years combined experience modifying thousands of container projects for just about any business use you can imagine.

WHETHER YOUR BUSINESS IS COMMERCIAL, HEALTHCARE, GOVERNMENT OR EDUCATION, OR YOUR INTEREST IS TO RENT, BUY OR MODIFY SHIPPING CONTAINERS, SMS HAS YOU COVERED:

One
Offsite storage alternatives cause a mess of hassles and headaches. Expanding office space and storage capacity at your location saves time, money and hassle of making multiple trips offsite.
We offer more choice in security, size and features in steel Conex boxes or ISO shipping containers than a public storage unit or Pod for less cost and far greater service.
We offer flexible, month-to-month rental agreements and prorate by the day after your first 28-day billing cycle.
With us, you get a dedicated account manager you can rely on, so you can focus on running your business than waste time with a different person every time you call that doesn't know or care as much.
While other companies may have some staff for modifying containers, most outsource the work, so you don't know who is actually doing the modifications or how much they're marking up the price.
 Mobile Storage Containers Panorama City, CA
When you modify a shipping container for your business, you won't have to worry about expensive, lengthy and complicated construction.
We have modified thousands of containers nationwide and internationally for more than 25 years for NASA, US Navy, GCP Applied Technologies, Helix and Sundt to name a few. And rent containers to Amazon, Walmart and many of other nationally recognized brands.
Our extensive staff makes it possible to custom build multiple projects simultaneously and our 90,000 sq ft indoor fabrication facility prevents contaminants from interfering with fabrication, which delivers better quality and precision.

CUSTOM CONTAINERS FOR YOUR HOME IN Panorama City, CA

Building additions to your home can be very expensive and requires going through the hassle of securing permits and waiting for construction. You can save money, time and stress by modifying a shipping container instead. Whether you need additional space for a home gym, recreation or storage, we can convert steel containers into anything you can imagine. Our custom container gyms, man-caves or she-sheds, garages and more give you the extra space you need without the hassle, cost and wait that comes with home renovation.

Renting shipping containers for temporary storage, either when moving or dealing with restoration from a fire or flood, provides a secure, convenient way to keep your belongings close for accessing them whenever you need to. Plus, renting mobile storage containers for moving costs less than traditional movers and allows you to take your time packing, reducing the stress that comes from moving. You can also rent portable offices for your home to make working remotely distraction-free.

 Rent Shipping Containers Panorama City, CA

HERE'S WHY YOU SHOULD CHOOSE US TO RENT, BUY OR MODIFY A SHIPPING CONTAINER FOR YOUR HOME:

With an extensive in-house staff and 90,000 sq ft container modification facility, we're able to deliver consistently high quality and work on multiple projects simultaneously for a fast turnaround.

Other companies don't have the facility, staff or resources to modify shipping containers and will outsource the work to various shops who may not have the special experience or tools needed to modify the right way.

You can rest assured knowing your custom container is safe in our hands. Our certified weld and quality control inspectors ensure everything is structurally sound and built to your specifications through every step of the process.

Renting a moving container from us makes your move much less stressful because you won't have to rush to pack your whole house into a moving truck in one day. Instead, you can take your time packing over the course of a month.

Our ISO shipping containers are weatherproof and come with vault-like security, so you don't have to worry about theft or damage to your belongings.

You won't get that level of security from U-Haul or other moving truck companies.

Renting a storage container at your home keeps your belongings close and gives you convenient 24/7 access, so you're always able to retrieve the contents of your container when you need to.

We know move in and move out dates don't always line up. We can store your packed rental container at our secure facility until your new home is ready.

With our mobile storage containers for rent in Panorama City, CA, you can save up to 40% when compared to full-service long-distance movers, while gaining more flexibility in your schedule.

MOBILE STORAGE CONTAINERS & PORTABLE OFFICES TO RENT, BUY OR MODIFY IN Panorama City, CA

We know your needs may change suddenly. With our extensive inventory and variety of sizes of portable offices and shipping containers to rent, buy or modify in Panorama City, CA, we provide fast service and the best value possible so it's easy for you to get whatever you need when you need it.

Renting storage containers and portable offices from us gives you more flexibility when it comes to your schedule and options. If you don't have enough space at your current location or simply would prefer offsite storage, you can keep your rental storage and office containers at your location or ours - whichever is most convenient for you. You also get more options to choose from when it comes to size and features, like portable offices with divided rooms for private meetings or office/storage combos for storage and office space in one container. All while costing a fraction of the price of a pod or self-storage facility.

You can also buy new or used freight containers from us and choose from a variety of add-ons, including lights, electricity, doors and windows. Or fully customize a shipping container to save time, money and energy by skipping the expensive, lengthy process of constructing building additions. We can modify a Conex box into whatever you can imagine for any use you need, from construction tool cribs to office buildings, monitoring stations, mobile communication towers and much more. The possibilities are endless.

HERE'S HOW WE'VE GOT YOUR BACK:

You'll never face hidden fees or surprises with us. We give you transparent billing up front at the best prices.

With us, you get a reliable, dedicated point of contact, who keeps you updated every step of the way. You can rest assured knowing you'll always get what you need, when you need it.

No other company has the breadth and depth of staff and experience that we do when it comes to modifying shipping containers. Our certified welders, engineers, electricians, plumbers, carpenters and painters have more than 500 years of combined experience in fabricating custom steel containers.

We prorate your rent by the day after the first 28-day billing cycle, so you don't have to pay for a full month when you only have your mobile containers and offices for a few days.

While other companies may be able to do small container modifications, most don't have an in-house fabrication staff or 90,000 sq ft fabrication facility like we do. As a result, they outsource the work on your custom container, so you don't know who's actually building it.

Rest assured knowing your modified shipping container will be built to the highest quality standards. Our certified weld and quality control inspectors check every step of the fabrication process to ensure everything is structurally sound and built to your specifications.

HOW RENTING A STORAGE CONTAINER AND MOBILE OFFICE WORKS

Whether you're in need of a storage container for your commercial business, a portable office for your construction site, or a moving container for your home, our process is simple and straightforward.

Choose Your Container

Choose the mobile storage solution that works best for your needs. In this step, you will let us know the number of containers you need, their sizes and what types of doors to equip.

Choose Your Options

Let us know if you would like to add any of our rental options, like a folding table or shelving.

Choose Your Security

Choose from padlocks, puck locks and other enhanced security options. All of our storage containers come standard with dual-locking, vault-like security.

Choose Your Delivery Timeframe

You can expect standard delivery within 3-5 days of your order. If you need expedited delivery, we will do everything in our power to accommodate your needs.

Pick-Up Planning

Do you need to keep your shipping container at our location? Prefer to have our team deliver your packed container to a location of your choice? Let us know, and we'll be by your side to work out the logistics.

HOW RENTING A STORAGE CONTAINER AND MOBILE OFFICE WORKS

1

DETERMINE DESTINATION

Let our team know where we should deliver your mobile storage container for rent in Panorama City, CA. Be sure to let us know if there are any special conditions that might prevent our drivers from entering your chosen destination. Before you schedule your delivery, let us know which direction you would like the doors of your container to face.

2

SCHEDULE DATE & TIME

Our drivers can deliver your storage container Monday-Friday, between the hours of 6AM and 2PM local time. Our two-hour delivery window is the most precise in the industry. If you desire another delivery time outside of our standard delivery options, we will do our best to accommodate your needs. As a courtesy, our driver will call you at least 30 minutes before they arrive at your drop-off destination.

3

PREPARE FOR YOUR MOBILE STORAGE CONTAINER DELIVERY

Before we deliver your Conex box, prepare your delivery area by ensuring that there are no low overhangs, arches, wires, trees or any other obstacles that could interfere with your delivery. It's a good idea to mark the space where you would like your steel container placed.

4

DELIVERY & SETUP

When our driver arrives, they will back our truck into the space where you would like your shipping container placed. Once we arrive, we will ensure that your container is delivered safely and securely. If placed on asphalt or pavement, we will use wood dunnage pads to make sure your ground surface is protected and the container is level.

HAVE QUESTIONS ABOUT MOBILE CONTAINERS TO Rent, Buy OR Modify IN Panorama City, CA?

Check out our FAQ page or reach out to our helpful customer service team today @

909.341.4736

Latest News in Panorama City, CA

Construction of Corazón del Valle in Panorama City, California, Begins

Construction of the Corazón del Valle, a new affordable and permanent supportive housing complex located just west of Van Nuys Boulevard in Panorama City has begun. The project will be built on a County-owned land at 14545 Lanark Street, immediately south of the Panorama Mall.Designed and represented in drawings by Perkins&Will as a trio of amorphous five-story towers divided by courtyards and breezeway, the Corazón del Valle will consist of twin ...

Construction of the Corazón del Valle, a new affordable and permanent supportive housing complex located just west of Van Nuys Boulevard in Panorama City has begun. The project will be built on a County-owned land at 14545 Lanark Street, immediately south of the Panorama Mall.

Designed and represented in drawings by Perkins&Will as a trio of amorphous five-story towers divided by courtyards and breezeway, the Corazón del Valle will consist of twin buildings with 180 studios, one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments.

Corazón del Valle features

Search for construction leads

According to a Clifford Beers Housing press release, the Corazón del Valle in Panorama City will incorporate a greywater system that would save more than 70,000 gallons of potable water per year, as well as solar panels that will generate 22% of the property’s power. In addition to housing, the project will offer case management services supplied by the San Fernando Valley Community Mental Health Center, which will also run a community clinic in the property’s commercial space on the ground level.

The units at the Corazón del Valle will reportedly be allocated for previously unhoused people and low-income households. The flats will be suitable for single persons earning up to $12,400 per year or families earning up to $70,000 per year.

“Every unit at Corazón del Valle is a friendly environment for a Los Angeles citizen who will soon have a safe and nice place to live. I look forward to our opening day when over 200 folks will be able to breathe a huge sigh of relief knowing they no longer have to confront the specter of homelessness,” said LA County Supervisor Sheila Kuehl in comments.

Funding and team behind the project

More than $100 million in public monies granted by the City and County of Los Angeles, as well as more than $45 million in money allocated by Enterprise Community Partners, will be used to build Corazón del Valle, which is set to open in stages between 2023 and 2024.

Genesis LA, the Corporation for Supportive Housing, and general contractor Alpha Construction are all involved in the project.

Can we do it? Unprecedented water cuts will require sacrifices for Southern California

In less than a month, residents in large portions of Southern California will be under unprecedented water restrictions due to a worsening drought that has severely limited water supplies.The biggest change is the requirement from the Metropolitan Water District that local water suppliers in those areas, from Ventura County to northwestern L.A. County to parts of the Inland Empire, limit outdoor watering to once a week.But behind that is a big cut in water use needed to avoid even more serious measures. Can we do it? Here&rsquo...

In less than a month, residents in large portions of Southern California will be under unprecedented water restrictions due to a worsening drought that has severely limited water supplies.

The biggest change is the requirement from the Metropolitan Water District that local water suppliers in those areas, from Ventura County to northwestern L.A. County to parts of the Inland Empire, limit outdoor watering to once a week.

But behind that is a big cut in water use needed to avoid even more serious measures. Can we do it? Here’s what we know:

How much water do we now use?

Currently, the average potable water use across the MWD’s service area — including residential, commercial and industrial water use — amounts to 125 gallons per person per day.

But those numbers vary by water agency. Ellen Cheng, a spokesperson for the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, said customers average about 111 gallons per person per day.

How much water will those in targeted areas need to use to hit savings numbers?

80 gallons per day — or a 35% drop.

How do officials expect us to get there?

The focus right now is on outdoor water use.

Under the new rules, MWD will require suppliers to limit watering times on the one day when outdoor watering is allowed for each customer. The details will be left to each supplier, but some water agencies have already said sprinklers should run no more than eight minutes. That alone should achieve significant savings, since outdoor watering accounts for as much as 70% of residential use in the region, according to the MWD.

What will the impact of that be on the landscape?

Officials expect yellow and brown lawns due to less water.

“We cannot afford green lawns,” said Adel Hagekhalil, the MWD’s general manager, last week.

There are exceptions to the new rules, however. Those exceptions are meant to protect the region’s trees, which provide valuable shade and help stave off dangerous heat health effects.

“The fact is, we don’t want to see our beautiful and ecologically important tree canopy suffer because of these restrictions,” said Deven Upadhyay, the MWD’s chief operating officer. “People should be able to continue to hand-water their trees.”

What about watering?

Shorter showers. Fewer flushes. Use of water-efficient appliances. But as you go about trimming your water usage at home, experts say the biggest potential for shrinking water use lies outdoors in our yards. That’s why officials focused on cutting outdoor water use.

Shahzeen Attari, an associate professor at Indiana University in Bloomington, said that focusing the restrictions on a specific activity — outdoor watering — instead of a per-capita number makes sense from a policy perspective, at least for the time being.

“If I say you’re only allowed to use water on a particular day, on a Tuesday for example, then anyone who’s watering on Wednesday, Thursday or Friday, it’s easy to say you’re not in compliance,” said Attari. “But if I say you’re allowed to use 10 gallons any time during the week ... it’s really hard for me to know whether you’ve reached your quota or not.”

Am I covered by the restrictions?

The rules will target areas that rely heavily or entirely on the State Water Project, a Northern California water supply that officials say has just 5% of full water allocations available this year. Water supplies in reservoirs across the state have shrunk dramatically over the past three years during the extreme drought, which is being significantly worsened by higher temperatures caused by climate change.

Areas that receive water from the Colorado River and other sources will be spared, at least for now.

The affected agencies include: Calleguas Municipal Water District, Inland Empire Utilities Agency, Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, Los Angeles Department of Water and Power, Three Valleys Municipal Water District and Upper San Gabriel Valley Municipal Water District.

It will fall to each member agency to determine how best to implement the restrictions.

According to MWD, all or part of the following cities and communities are dependent on water from the State Water Project and will be affected by the new restrictions:

Primestor plans high-rise complex at Panorama Mall

The Panorama Mall, a longtime landmark in the northern San Fernando Valley, is in for some big changes.Primestor Development, which owns the roughly 20-acre shopping center at 8401 N. Van Nuys Boulevard, filed plans last month with the City of Los Angeles to redevelop the property with nearly 4.5 million square feet of residenti...

The Panorama Mall, a longtime landmark in the northern San Fernando Valley, is in for some big changes.

Primestor Development, which owns the roughly 20-acre shopping center at 8401 N. Van Nuys Boulevard, filed plans last month with the City of Los Angeles to redevelop the property with nearly 4.5 million square feet of residential, hotel, and other commercial uses. Existing improvements, which include roughly 143,000 square feet of retail and restaurant space, as well as surface parking for 1,305 vehicles, would give way to a phased development consisting of:

Excluded from the project are a retail building now occupied by a Walmart, as well as a restaurant at the intersection of Van Nuys and Roscoe Boulevards.

Per findings included with the project application, the multifamily housing would include a mix of market-rate, senior, low-income, workforce, and dormitory units. Roughly 20 percent of the total housing, or just over 700 residential units, would be restricted low-income affordable housing.

Proposed commercial uses would include a fitness center, restaurant space, a movie theater with up to 2,300 seats, a recording or movie studio, medical offices, and room for either a banquet hall or a museum.

The sprawling project site, which spans a block bounded by Van Nuys, Roscoe, Tobias Avenue, and Chase Street, would feature more than 146,000 square feet of common open space, including an event plaza and an outdoor concourse.

An unspecified number of parking stalls would be provided in above- and below-grade garage space.

The proposed specific plan would accommodate some of the tallest buildings in the San Fernando Valley, with 15-story buildings oriented toward the northern side of the site adjacent to Chase Street, and 20- and 30-story buildings along Roscoe Boulevard to the south.

Pending approvals, Primestor would redevelop the mall in four phases over the course of 20 years, starting with the area currently used as surface parking along the west side of the mall, before moving on to the retail buildings at the northeast corner of the project site. The final component of the project would replace surface parking at the southeast corner of the property.

Plans to redevelop the mall, which Primestor first considered more than five years ago, come at a time when both public and private investment is flowing into the Panorama City community.

Perhaps the most visible change will be in the median of Van Nuys Boulevard, where Metro is in the planning stages for a new light rail line which will connect the north San Fernando Valley with Van Nuys. A stop is proposed at Roscoe Boulevard, adjacent to the Panorama Mall.

A block south of the mall, an office tower vacant since the 1994 Northridge earthquake was revived in 2020 as a 194-unit rental apartment complex by developer Izek Shomof, who is also planning 200 apartments to replace a parking lot next door.

Likewise, construction recently kicked off for a 180-unit affordable and permanent supportive housing complex on a Los Angeles County-owned site along Lanark Street.

Taft defeats Panorama for City Division III football title

Senior quarterback Wellington Bristow broke a tackle in the backfield, sprinted to his left and stretched the football just inside the pylon for a two point-conversion with 53 seconds left to lift Woodland Hills Taft to a 21-20 triumph over Panorama in the City Section Division III championship game at Lake Balboa Birmingham High on Friday afternoon.Bristow completed 13 of 27 passes for 172 yards and three touchdowns, including an 11-yard strike to Amir Dutt to pull the top-seeded Toreadors (7-7) to within 20-19.“We knew ...

Senior quarterback Wellington Bristow broke a tackle in the backfield, sprinted to his left and stretched the football just inside the pylon for a two point-conversion with 53 seconds left to lift Woodland Hills Taft to a 21-20 triumph over Panorama in the City Section Division III championship game at Lake Balboa Birmingham High on Friday afternoon.

Bristow completed 13 of 27 passes for 172 yards and three touchdowns, including an 11-yard strike to Amir Dutt to pull the top-seeded Toreadors (7-7) to within 20-19.

“We knew were going for two and I knew what I wanted us to run,” Bristow said. “It was play-action where I keep it and the defense read it, but there was no way I was going down. It means so much because people were saying how bad we were all year.”

With 53 seconds left, Taft’s Wellington Bristow converts the 2 point attempt and Taft wins the Division 3 CIF Title 21-20! ⁦@C_Morrissette⁩ ⁦@Tarek_Fattal⁩ ⁦@Daygofootball⁩ ⁦@latsondheimerpic.twitter.com/2rfZtZrxTt

— Aron Gideon (@GideonAron) November 27, 2021

Daniel Ramirez intercepted a pass inside the Pythons’ 40-yard line with 39 seconds left to seal the win.

Melvin Linares rushed 18 times for 140 yards and all three scores for the third-seeded Pythons (8-6), who were vying for their first City football title since the school opened in 2006. Panorama had upset No. 2 San Fernando 39-13 in the semifinals.

Entering the season, Taft had not won a football game since a 35-0 shutout of Chatsworth on Oct. 27, 2017, and the Toreadors’ losing streak reached 26 before they snapped it with a 43-6 win against Van Nuys on Aug. 27.

“We’ve come a long way since we scrimmaged them [Panorama] in August — and so have they,” said first-year coach Jeff Kearin, formerly the head coach at Los Angeles Loyola and Cal State Northridge. “I can point to 10 guys right now who never put a helmet on before the season. We’ve battled all year and even tonight all bets were off, but we pulled it out.”

City of L.A. to buy 16 buildings through Project Homekey

At its meeting on January 27, the Board of Commissioners of the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) voted to approve the latest batch of purchase through Project Homekey, the state program which provides money for jurisdictions to acquire hotels and market-rate apartments buildings to repurpose them as interim or permanent supportive housing.For nearly $508 million (including state and local funding), the HACLA and the City of ...

At its meeting on January 27, the Board of Commissioners of the Housing Authority of the City of Los Angeles (HACLA) voted to approve the latest batch of purchase through Project Homekey, the state program which provides money for jurisdictions to acquire hotels and market-rate apartments buildings to repurpose them as interim or permanent supportive housing.

For nearly $508 million (including state and local funding), the HACLA and the City of Los Angeles is poised to buy 16 different properties totaling 1,276 residential units - a per-unit price tag of just over $398,000. The properties are as follows:

A five-story, 41-unit apartment complex with a single level of at-grade apartments located near the Crenshaw/LAX Line in Hyde Park. The City of Los Angeles is expected to pay $17.3 million for the newly-built property, with an expected closing date in late February 2022.

A six-story, 42-unit apartment complex built by Schon Tepler Group in Historic Filipinotown. The City of Los Angeles is expected to pay $18.6 million for the building, with an expected closing date in May 2022.

A two-story, 29-unit apartment complex next to the Pacoima Wash in Panorama City, which dates to the 1970s. HACLA is expected to close on the $10-million purchase in May 2022.

A recently-completed five-story, 36-unit apartment complex located near the Van Nuys Metrolink Station in the San Fernando Valley. The City of Los Angeles is expected to pay $16.6 million for the building, with a closing date at the close of February 2022.

A four-story, 27-unit apartment complex with at-grade parking and commercial space near the intersection of Sunset Boulevard and Alvarado Street in Echo Park. The City of Los Angeles is primed to pay $11.2 million to developer Schon Tepler Group for the newly-built structure, with a closing date in May 2022.

A newly-built 128-unit apartment complex in South Los Angeles. The City of Los Angeles will pay $49.5 million for the building in a transaction which is expected to close in March 2022.

A six-story, 80-unit modular apartment complex built by Universal Standard Housing in Westlake. HACLA has agreed to pay $31 million for the property.

A seven-story mixed-use building with 101 apartments and ground-floor commercial space in Canoga Park. The City of Los Angeles will pay $55.2 million for the building in a deal expected to close in April 2022.

A recently-completed mixed-use complex featuring 79 apartments and 2,100 square feet of retail space in Mid-City. HACLA will acquire the building for $36.5 million.

6531 S. Sepulveda Boulevard

The City of Los Angeles will acquire an Extended Stay America hotel at 6531 S. Sepulveda Boulevard in Westchester for $52.5 million. The transaction, expected to close in June 2022, will include 133 dwellings.

18602 S. Vermont Avenue

The City of Los Angeles is poised to pay $37.8 million to acquire an Extended Stay America hotel located at 18602 S. Vermont Avenue in Harbor Gateway, creating 136 dwelling units.

20205 Ventura Boulevard

Another Extended Stay America hotel located at 20205 Ventura Boulevard in Woodland Hills, consisting of 146 units, is expected to sell to the City of Los Angeles in a deal closing in June 2022.

19325 Londelius Street

In Northridge, a fourth Extended Stay America hotel is expected to sell to the City of Los Angeles for $46.8 million in June 2022, creating an additional 117 dwellings.

10150 Hillhaven Avenue

A newly built 62-unit apartment complex located in the Tujunga neighborhood. HACLA is poised to pay $17.7 million for the building in a deal closing in May 2022.

BLVD Hotel

Just north of Hollywood Boulevard, the City of Los Angeles has agreed to pay $24.4 million to acquire the BLVD Hotel at 2010 N. Highland Avenue, creating 62 homes. The deal is expected to close in May 2022.

An 85-key hotel located just south of the I-10 freeway in Boyle Heights. HACLA will pay $35.8 million for the under-construction building in a deal closing in September 2022.

Nurses, doctors sick. Ambulances, blood in short supply. Omicron hits L.A. healthcare hard

Los Angeles County’s hospitals are straining to provide medical care, hobbled by staffing shortages far worse than last winter’s coronavirus surge.Many healthcare workers, burned out by the pandemic, have quit, and many who remain have tested positive for the virus and are at home isolating. And healthcare facilities are busier this year because there’s more de...

Los Angeles County’s hospitals are straining to provide medical care, hobbled by staffing shortages far worse than last winter’s coronavirus surge.

Many healthcare workers, burned out by the pandemic, have quit, and many who remain have tested positive for the virus and are at home isolating. And healthcare facilities are busier this year because there’s more demand for non-COVID-19 care.

Among L.A. County’s four public hospitals, hundreds of coronavirus-positive health workers are in isolation, which “has made it virtually impossible to ... maintain services that are at a level of care needed to support safe patient care,” Health Services Director Dr. Christina Ghaly told the county Board of Supervisors this week.

“The numbers are due to the much higher rates of community transmission than what we have experienced at any previous point in this pandemic,” Ghaly said. “There’s just a lot more virus out there in the community. And healthcare workers, just like anybody else, are getting infected.”

It’s not just nurses that are in short supply. “It affects physicians, respiratory therapists, radiology techs, lab staffs — the whole gamut of what is needed to run a hospital safely,” Ghaly said.

In the face of the latest surge in cases, Kaiser Permanente Southern California is temporarily postponing all elective surgeries that require an inpatient stay in the hospital after an operation, it announced Wednesday.

The hospital system will continue to perform emergency surgeries, urgent procedures including those involving cancer patients or people whose medical condition would be worsened by a delay, and elective outpatient surgeries that do not require an overnight stay in the hospital, its regional director of medical quality, Dr. Nancy Gin, said.

“We will continue to do everything we can to minimize the impact on our members and the public,” Gin said.

Ambulances are also facing longer delays before they can drop off patients. Companies who contract with the county to provide emergency transport through the 911 system “have experienced severe staffing shortages and are having difficulty responding to calls in a timely manner,” Ghaly said. Many employees are out sick, while other workers are not vaccinated, and “as a result, they are not able to work in line with public health orders.”

L.A. County has identified the 20 most hard-hit emergency rooms, and county employees have been dispatched to the top 10 — all privately run hospitals — to assist with offloading ambulances; the other eight are expected to receive federal help within the next two weeks, Ghaly said.

On Saturday, California sent a strike team to augment the 911 ambulance companies. “We requested five; we received one, with one still pending and three [to be determined,]” she said.

Besides the hospital surge, Ghaly warned that blood supplies across L.A. County are reaching a critical shortage. The American Red Cross is calling the nationwide blood shortage the worst in more than a decade.

“The demand for blood is high, but the donation volume is still down,” said Ghaly, who urged people to donate by going to redcrossblood.org. “Trauma centers just cannot operate without blood. If there’s not blood, they will need to close, and that is not a situation that we want to find ourselves in.”

Blood shortages forced the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services to shut down one of its trauma centers to new patients for hours earlier this week — a step it had not taken in over three decades, officials at the department said Wednesday.

The trauma center at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center closed to new patients for more than two hours Monday, a department spokesperson said. It had to reach out to other hospitals in the DHS system for blood in order to reopen.

The strain on hospitals in L.A. County is exacerbated because other facilities are refusing to care for coronavirus-positive patients. Outpatient dialysis companies are sending coronavirus-positive patients to hospitals, said Ghaly, adding that practice is inappropriate.

In addition, congregate residential care facilities, including those that care for mental health patients, are sometimes refusing coronavirus-positive patients, Ghaly said, “causing huge backlogs of patients filling up precious hospital beds.”

County officials are working to establish a motel voucher program to provide quarantine and isolation locations for residents who don’t require a certain level of medical oversight.

The county and state have deployed staff to establish three hospital surge units at: Mission Community Hospital in Panorama City, Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center in San Pedro and Antelope Valley Hospital in Lancaster.

To reduce transmission risk among visitors, L.A. County’s public hospitals have also restricted visiting hours, including the duration and number of visitors allowed.

Hospitalizations of coronavirus-positive patients in L.A. County are rising rapidly, growing to 3,912 as of Tuesday, six times the number compared to last month. But the latest tally is still a fraction of the record 8,098 coronavirus-positive patients recorded Jan. 5, 2021.

There were 536 COVID-19 patients in L.A. County intensive care units as of Monday, triple last month’s number. That is still less than one-third of last year’s peak, when there were 1,731 on Jan. 8, 2021.

Still, some officials expect the number of hospitalized coronavirus-positive patients to climb. As of Tuesday, California hospitals had 12,317 coronavirus-positive patients; that’s a little more than half the record of 21,938 set Jan. 6, 2021.

One model cited by Gov. Gavin Newsom on Monday indicated it’s plausible that the number of coronavirus-patients hospitalized in California could reach 23,000 by Feb. 2 — exceeding the pandemic record.

Newsom said that as of Wednesday morning, there were about 52,400 people hospitalized for all reasons, including COVID-19, in California. That’s nearing the peak of 53,000 set during last winter’s surge, a number California is expected to hit later this week, the governor said.

Data show that 4.5% of those who are infected with the Omicron variant are hospitalized, Newsom said Monday. That’s better than past surges: L.A. County estimated that during last year’s peak, 15% to 20% of coronavirus cases led to hospitalizations, and during the summer Delta wave, 5% to 6% of infections resulted in hospitalizations.

Newsom said the average length of stay in the hospital for Omicron patients is 3.6 days, fewer than for previous variants.

But the sheer number of Californians becoming infected with Omicron means that hospitals will likely continue to be stressed, even though a lower percentage of those infected need hospitalization.

“The totality of those getting this variant are such that it’s going to put tremendous strain on our hospital system. It’s not unique to California,” Newsom said.

The governor said the demands on hospitals this winter are “manageable, but it’s challenging. It’s difficult.”

Emergency rooms statewide are undergoing immense strain. On Sunday, there were 55,000 total emergency department visits statewide, according to data Newsom presented; a year ago, there were 27,000.

The difference is that the demand for non-COVID emergency care is worse than last year, when much of California was under regional stay-at-home orders. On Sunday, there were 12,500 emergency department visits related to COVID-19; last year at this time, there were 11,500.

Evidence continues to show that many infections with Omicron result in mild or moderate illness. Still, people should still do as much as they can to avoid getting infected, L.A. County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said, particularly since Omicron survivors might be at risk of long COVID. There also is worry about children developing multisystem inflammatory syndrome, a rare but serious condition that can be deadly.

“We do know that weeks after last winter’s surge, we saw a huge increase in MIS cases, so it remains prudent to do everything you can to avoid getting infected,” Ferrer said.

Pediatric hospitalizations have risen recently. On Jan. 1, there were 79 coronavirus-positive children in L.A. County’s hospitals, 58 of them among children under 5, who are too young to be vaccinated. There were only four coronavirus-positive children younger than 5 hospitalized across L.A. County on Dec. 4.

Filipino Americans hope for more recognition with new arch in L.A.’s Historic Filipinotown

People come to Little Ongpin from as far as Las Vegas for lumpia, steamed pork buns, beef caldereta and other Filipino specialties.But few of these loyal customers know that the restaurant is on the edge of a neighborhood called Historic Filipinotown.“We have Koreatown, Chinatown, Little Tokyo, but in Filipinotown, nothing,” Beth Villago, whose mother opened the restaurant in 1980, said as she rang up meals and fielded phone orders.That may soon change with the construction of an arch spanning Beverly Bouleva...

People come to Little Ongpin from as far as Las Vegas for lumpia, steamed pork buns, beef caldereta and other Filipino specialties.

But few of these loyal customers know that the restaurant is on the edge of a neighborhood called Historic Filipinotown.

“We have Koreatown, Chinatown, Little Tokyo, but in Filipinotown, nothing,” Beth Villago, whose mother opened the restaurant in 1980, said as she rang up meals and fielded phone orders.

That may soon change with the construction of an arch spanning Beverly Boulevard near the 1st Street Bridge, its foundation inlaid with oyster shell windows in a nod to a common feature of traditional homes in the Philippines.

Filipino Americans are one of the largest Asian American groups in California, with 1.2 million residents, about half of whom call Greater Los Angeles home.

But they have never had the visibility of Chinese, Japanese or Koreans, whose distinctive neighborhoods and widespread culinary influence are long established.

Historic Filipinotown is easy to miss while driving down its main thoroughfares, Beverly Boulevard and Temple Street, just west of downtown Los Angeles.

Aside from Little Ongpin and a few other restaurants, there are no neon-signed clusters of Filipino businesses, no knots of tourists buying souvenirs and sampling the food.

The new arch will mark the eastern entrance to the neighborhood, much as the twin-dragon gate over Broadway welcomes visitors to Chinatown.

It will arrive at a moment when Filipino cuisine is finally being recognized by the gourmet dining world, earning Michelin stars. Filipino musicians such as Olivia Rodrigo, Saweetie and H.E.R. and politicians including California Atty. Gen. Rob Bonta are raising awareness about Filipino Americans.

As the neighborhood fights gentrification, Filipinotown leaders hope the arch will inspire greater engagement with city politics and with Filipino history, both for residents and for the larger Filipino American community.

The arch, which will be completed this month, was spearheaded by Jessica Caloza, the first Filipina American on the Los Angeles Board of Public Works.

After she was appointed to the board in 2019, she wanted to act on the long-standing wishes of some fellow Filipino Americans to build a gateway arch on Historic Filipinotown’s eastern edge.

She flagged some money left over from construction of the Red Car pedestrian bridge spanning the L.A. River. Councilman Mitch O’Farrell, who represents the area, also came up with some money from his office’s budget for the $587,000 project.

“I feel proud, and I hope the community ultimately feels proud, because it’s for them,” said Caloza, who moved to the U.S. from the Philippines as a young child.

The arch, titled “Talang Gabay: Our Guiding Star,” was designed by artist Eliseo Silva, who wanted to illustrate for Filipino Americans the narratives absent in history lessons they learned at school.

Much of the symbolism Silva included in the arch predates the Spanish and American colonization of the Philippines,from a shape that echoes precolonial palaces to roofing and beams that resemble traditional homes on stilts.

The arch is topped with ancient mythological figures, including the sarimanok, a bird that guides the harvest seasons, and the naga, a serpent-like dragon associated with lunar and solar eclipses.

Silva is known for the “Gintong Kasaysayan” mural in Filipinotown, which depicts a timeline of events in the Philippines and the U.S., including the 1965 Delano grape strike.

Many Filipino immigrants work long hours, not only providing for their families in the U.S. but sending money home to relatives in the Philippines. Sometimes, that doesn’t leave much time to pass Filipino culture on to the next generation, Silva said.

“Until we do that, we actually are not yet part of America,” said Silva, who recently moved back to the Philippines after decades in Southern California. “We’re not living to live, we’re living to work.”

In the coming weeks, two pillars that were erected on both sides of Beverly Boulevard months ago will be joined across the four-lane thoroughfare to make the 30-foot-long, 82-foot-wide steel arch.

The arch will contain a QR code for an online walking tour highlighting the neighborhood’s cultural landmarks.

Filipino Americans settled in the area after being displaced from their original neighborhood, called Little Manila, on Bunker Hill in downtown L.A. to make way for massive redevelopment projects such as the 101 and 110 Freeways.

Gerald Gubatan’s father was one of the Filipino Americans forced to move west from Bunker Hill after World War II. At the time, restrictive racial covenants limited where Filipinos could live.

Signs such as “No Filipinos or Dogs Allowed” and “Positively No Filipinos Allowed” were a common sight, according to a city report that Gubatan, an urban planner, helped write.

“In my mind, symbolically, it connects ... Little Manila with the community that was displaced westward to Historic Filipinotown,” Gubatan said of the gateway arch, which points east toward the original neighborhood.

Gubatan, 60, grew up in Historic Filipinotown and moved to Burbank in the 1990s, a choice made by many upwardly mobile Filipinos.

Others fanned out to L.A. neighborhoods including Eagle Rock and Panorama City, as well as suburban cities such as Carson and West Covina.

Historic Filipinotown is now majority Latino, with a Filipino American population of about 15%. Even so, it remains an important commercial and cultural center for Filipinos across the region.

When Gubatan moved back to the neighborhood in 2012, he was shocked by how much it had changed.

He and others fear that gentrification will do to Historic Filipinotown what postwar public works projects did to Little Manila.

In a city of rising real estate prices, Filipinotown’s location near gentrified, trendy neighborhoods such as Echo Park and Silver Lake make it a prime target for new development. Luxury apartments are sprouting where strip malls once stood and where working-class Filipino families once lived.

Luzon Plaza, a strip mall on Temple Street, was developed in the 1970s by community advocates aiming to boost Filipino businesses.

Through the years, the businesses in the strip mall have helped feed, dress, heal and educate Filipino Angelenos.

The Filipino restaurant, karaoke bar, beauty salon, tax services office and dental clinic still operating there will soon be demolished for a five-story apartment complex with mostly luxury units.

Four other large luxury apartment projects are also going up along Temple Street.

Joseph Bernardo, an adjunct professor at Loyola Marymount University who researches Filipino American history in Los Angeles, is part of a coalition that opposes gentrification in the neighborhood.

“Having the gateway is good,” said Bernardo, a lifelong Northridge resident. “But what’s going to happen here with Luzon Plaza? Where’s the policy that addresses gentrification in the neighborhood?”

Joselyn Geaga-Rosenthal has seen many of her Filipino neighbors move away or die in recent years. Their homes were then sold to developers, she said.

A longtime Historic Filipinotown resident and community leader, Geaga-Rosenthal was part of the campaign that gave the neighborhood its name in 2002.

Her mother, Remy V. Geaga, who co-founded the Filipino American Service Group, is honored at Temple and Alvarado streets. “Remy V. Geaga Square, Fearless Filipino-American Community Leader,” signs at the intersection say.

Geaga-Rosenthal is on the planning committee for the arch and sees it as an important part of fighting gentrification.

The arch will give a new generation of Filipino Americans a better understanding of their culture and history, which may motivate them to fight for the neighborhood, she said.

But it was hard to come up with a design that represents all things about Filipinos — just as it was hard to encapsulate her mother in a few signs.

“I guess we aren’t there yet ... where we’re recognized, that our story is known, and so we feel like we have to tell our whole story in a square inch of art,” she said.

The planning committee consisted of community leaders such as Geaga-Rosenthal and the heads of local Filipino organizations.

But some have complained that process wasn’t inclusive enough. Other projects, such as the lampposts along Temple Street decorated with Filipino sun medallions, incorporated public input in the design process.

Some have also objected to the arch’s depiction of a “parol” — a star-shaped lantern displayed by Filipinos during the Christmas season — because of its associations with Spanish and American colonialism. Others had hoped the arch would reckon more with the American colonial presence in the Philippines, which drove many Filipinos to immigrate to the U.S.

Dulce Capadocia, a dance artist and choreographer who grew up in Historic Filipinotown and lived there until recently, said she is pleased the neighborhood is getting such a large monument. But she wonders why the project didn’t include more community members and artists.

“What would this have been like if this were a collaborative project, if more people were involved — maybe a team of artists to make this more equitable?” Capadocia said.

Joseph Cipriano lives in Historic Filipinotown, across the street from a memorial to Filipino and Filipino American World War II veterans.

He moved to L.A. from the Philippines in 2018 to join his mother, settling in the neighborhood because of the affordable rent and the many Filipino immigrants.

Dollar Hits, a buffet-style restaurant on Temple Street serving Filipino street food, is one of his favorite hangouts.

“There’s a lot of Filipinos here,” Cipriano said. “We’re just comfortable having Filipino neighbors.”

He is proud of the World War II monument. But because he works so much, putting in 80 hours a week as a certified nursing assistant at a nearby convalescent home, he said he has had little time to think about the new arch.

Cipriano is also worried about his rent, which keeps going up, and the new luxury apartments on his street.

“It’s just too expensive — those new ones,” he said, pointing toward the luxury complexes.

Goldstein Investigates: Cameras catch employees throwing away food meant for the homeless

Employees with the Los Angeles Homeless Services were caught on camera throwing food meant for the unhoused straight into the dumpster."It's a theft of taxpayer dollars," said Jay Handal, Chair of The Homeless Committee for the L.A. Neighborhood Councils. "These people are being paid to go out and service and take care of people so not only are they stealing their pay but they're throwing away good, valuable food for people who have nothing to eat."...

Employees with the Los Angeles Homeless Services were caught on camera throwing food meant for the unhoused straight into the dumpster.

"It's a theft of taxpayer dollars," said Jay Handal, Chair of The Homeless Committee for the L.A. Neighborhood Councils. "These people are being paid to go out and service and take care of people so not only are they stealing their pay but they're throwing away good, valuable food for people who have nothing to eat."

INSIDE THE INVESTIGATION: Watch as David and Pat Harvey discuss additional details and share footage not Included In TV version

With hidden cameras, CBSLA's investigative team caught employees with LAHSA throwing cases of taxpayer-funded food meant for the homeless right into the dumpster.

"It's appalling what I see on that video," said Handal. "This is an absolute disgrace."

For months, the investigative team watched outreach workers with LAHSA picking up food for the less fortunate. The employees were supposed to spend their days interacting with the thousands of homeless in Los Angeles. LAHSA administrators said the goal was to build trust with the unhoused, using the food in hopes of convincing them to accept government service and housing.

One team that CBSLA followed could be seen picking up the homeless food, driving around for hours, stopping twice to give out meals before going on a break to walk around Balboa Park for an hour.

However, at the end of their shift, they were seen giving away all the food at a homeless encampment in Panorama City, folding up the empty boxes the food was once in.

But another team was seen driving and making stops at Target, Starbucks and McDonald's all while passing dozens of homeless people along the way. When they finally returned to their office, instead of folding up empty boxes, one LAHSA employee was seen throwing a case full of food in the dumpster behind their Panorama City building.

Another team was seen taking the boxes out of their car, walking into the room with the dumpsters and throwing a box filled with food right in the trash, even though there was a group of people living on the streets just a block away.

LAHSA — which received $800 million in public funds this fiscal year — did not provide anyone to speak with the investigative team but did write a statement which said in part:

"There are cases where teams have to bring food back to their headquarters because not all of the people they encounter will accept them."

LAHSA claims they give excess meals to shelters, but admit they discard meals because the meals are perishable. However, while the food was perishable, outreach teams were seen putting boxes in cars and driving around for hours without any refrigeration.

"You know I think LAHSA owes an explanation," said L.A. County Supervisor Kathryn Barger, a critic of LAHSA who says she does not believe the organization's explanation.

"When you look at what's in there — an apple — that'll be good the next day," she said. "Who throws a cookie away? Right there that pisses me off."

Andy Bales, the head of Union Rescue Mission, which serves 2000 meals every day to their homeless guests, was heartbroken when he saw the video of LAHSA employees dumping food.

"People are hungry, out on the streets and need to be fed and none of us should be wasting any food," said Bales.

The mission also said LAHSA never offered excess food to them.

The county has already begun the process of breaking up LAHSA and starting a new agency that would tackle the homelessness crisis.

David Goldstein

Investigative Reporter David Goldstein has been honored with the 2015 Lifetime Achievement Award from Radio and Television News Association of Southern California and the 2013 Lifetime Achievement Award from the Los Angeles Press Club. In his more than three decades reporting in L.A., David has won more than 10 Emmy Awards and 20 Golden Mike Awards.

Twitter Facebook

How Culver City Hospital Ranks In CA Hospital Safety Grades: Report

The Leapfrog Group graded all of the state's hospitals based on more than 30 measures of patient safety. See how your local hospital fared.CULVER CITY, CA — Several hospitals in California received top marks, but others didn't quite measure up in the Spring 2022 Hospital Safety Grades report released Tuesday by The Leapfrog Group, an independent nonprofit health care watchdog group.The latest ratings reflect care during the COVID-19 pande...

The Leapfrog Group graded all of the state's hospitals based on more than 30 measures of patient safety. See how your local hospital fared.

CULVER CITY, CA — Several hospitals in California received top marks, but others didn't quite measure up in the Spring 2022 Hospital Safety Grades report released Tuesday by The Leapfrog Group, an independent nonprofit health care watchdog group.

The latest ratings reflect care during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Leapfrog Group said its and other groups' research showed the pandemic reversed years of progress in patient safety.

The pandemic has had a negative effect on "health care delivery at every level and setting, from staffing shortages to increased infections to the very care patients receive," according to the Patient Experience During the Pandemic: Adult Inpatient Care report, also released Tuesday by The Leapfrog Group.

"The health care workforce has faced unprecedented levels of pressure during the pandemic, and as a result, patients' experience with their care appears to have suffered," Leapfrog Group president and CEO Leah Binder said in a news release. "We commend the workforce for their heroic efforts these past few years and now strongly urge hospital leadership to recommit to improved care — from communication to responsiveness — and get back on track with patient safety outcomes."

In California, 91 hospitals received an "A" grade, 58 hospitals received a "B" grade, 107 hospitals received a "C" grade and 19 hospitals received a "D" grade. Five hospitals received an "F" grade.

In Culver City, Southern California Hospital at Culver City - Culver City received a "D" grade.

Here are the rankings, according to Leapfrog.

"A" HOSPITALS

"B" HOSPITALS

"C" HOSPITALS

"D" HOSPITALS

"F" HOSPITALS

The letter grades assigned to nearly 3,000 U.S general hospitals were based on more than 30 measures of patient safety. Leapfrog says its hospital rating system is the only one in the country focusing solely on a hospital's ability to protect patients from preventable errors, accidents, injuries and infections.

Included in the 30 are five that research has shown to directly affect patient outcomes, but can be improved with greater communication between caregivers and patients — the number of central line-associated bloodstream infections, catheter-associated urinary tract infections, infections from colon surgery, MRSA (Staphylococcus) blood laboratory-identified events, and facility-wide inpatient diarrhea events.

When there's communication about medications, for example, that can lead to fewer hospitalizations for conditions such as sepsis and blood clots, fewer complications, and decreases in the incidence of respiratory failure, Leapfrog said.

Among the findings:

To determine each hospital's grade, a panel of medical experts selected 30 evidence-based measures of patient safety such as postoperative sepsis, blood leakage and kidney injury. They then determined the weight of each measure based on evidence, the opportunity for improvement and patient impact.

Data on each measure was collected through the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services. Information from the Leapfrog Hospital Survey, available to all hospitals to complete, also affects grades.

Currently, Leapfrog does not assign grades to military or Veterans Administration hospitals, critical access hospitals, specialty hospitals, children's hospitals or outpatient surgery centers.

The Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade methodology has been peer-reviewed and published in the Journal of Patient Safety.

View the full methodology for the 2022 Leapfrog Hospital Safety Grade.

Get more local news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for free Patch newsletters and alerts.

EOPA California Congratulates LA City Council for Supporting the CA Divestment Act

On April 5, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to support Senate Bill 1173, the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act. Back on February 17, Senator Lena A. Gonzalez introduced the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act, SB-1173, in the California state legislature. The bill is co-sponsored by Sen. Scott Wiener and would mandate that California’s public pension funds stop investments in fossil fuel companies.Specifically, the legislation would give the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and the California Sta...

On April 5, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to support Senate Bill 1173, the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act. Back on February 17, Senator Lena A. Gonzalez introduced the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act, SB-1173, in the California state legislature. The bill is co-sponsored by Sen. Scott Wiener and would mandate that California’s public pension funds stop investments in fossil fuel companies.

Specifically, the legislation would give the California Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS) and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System (CalSTRS) until July 2027 to divest a combined $9.9 billion from the Carbon Underground 200, a list of companies considered to have the greatest potential for future fossil fuel emissions from their reserves and prohibit any new investments in those companies.

So far the California Senate Labor, Public Employment and Retirement Committee have approved the bill by a 3-1 vote.

“On behalf of over 430 elected officials from 49 counties working to phase out dangerous oil and gas drilling, Elected Officals to Protect America (EOPA) California congratulates the Los Angeles City Council for their bold leadership supporting SB-1173, the Fossil Fuel Divestment Act. When passed it will help stop the environmental devastation of communities of color who are disproportionately affected with toxic pollutants that can lead to premature death,” said Christian Brock, CEO of EOPA. “Instead of investing in fossil fuels, CalPERS could invest in clean energy solutions like offshore wind to ensure our clean energy independence. To achieve environmental justice state agencies must protect the environment, the health and the future of all Californians, not just some.”

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) reports that California has an enormous 112 GW of offshore wind technical power potential, representing 150 percent of the state's current electricity use.

CalPERS and CalSTRS are the two largest public pension funds in the United States.

"The brand new IPCC report is unequivocal: it's now or never if we want to limit planetary warming to reasonably safe levels," said Los Angeles City Councilmember Paul Koretz, author of the resolution to support SB 1173, EOPA California Leadership Council. "That means we need to immediately stop subsidizing the dangerously reckless fossil fuel industry. The pension systems are intended to provide workers a safe future. We need to provide those same workers that safe future with our investment decisions as well.”

LA City has been reconfiguring its own relationship with the fossil fuel industry, including declaring local oil drilling a non-conforming land use and closely examining the LA City Employees Retirement System Investments (CF#19-1577).

According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, in 2020, Russia was the third-largest producer of fossil fuels after the U.S. and Saudi Arabia. Putin’s war has been financed by $285M from sales of Russian oil daily.

In response to a letter from Governor Newsom, CalPERS has reported that it has over three quarters of a billion dollars in Russian investments, consisting of $420 million in public stocks and $345 million in illiquid real estate assets. Then CalPERS announced the following actions:

● CalPERS has ceased all transactions in Russian publicly traded equity and has stopped the flow of any new investments into the country.● CalPERS is actively assessing its real estate investments and determining a path forward.● CalPERS is reviewing all its investments in emerging markets, including Russia, due to the impacts the crisis has had on all financial markets.● CalPERS is following all regulatory requirements promulgated by the U.S. Office of Foreign Assets Control and the sanctions that are in place.

“Every day I recoil from images of neighborhoods where I played as a youngster as they go up in flames and are reduced to rubble. Clearly investments in fossil fuels are volatile and contribute to war. The horrific reality should be used to help accelerate a transition away from fossil fuels,” said Igor Tregub, Chair of the California Democratic Party Environmental Caucus and Former Berkeley Rent Stabilization Boardmember, EOPA California. “CalPERS should leave all Russian investments. Bolstering our energy supply with renewable solutions like distributed solar is a viable local solution that can be catalyzed right now. These and other renewable energy investments will catalyze the creation of thousands of new, well-paying Californian jobs, grow our economy, and literally save lives.”

For over eight years, teachers, students, and state workers have called for their pensions to be divested from fossil fuels. Many of the pension fund beneficiaries experience severe health impacts every day because they live near fossil fuel extraction operations. With divestment, the earnings of nearly 3 million active and retired public school teachers, college instructors, state and local employees, the health and wellbeing of all Californians would benefit.

The City of Los Angeles has a total of 5,229 oil wells, of which 296 are idle and the majority are located within 2,500 feet of homes, schools and hospitals. For comparison, in unincorporated Los Angeles County, there are nearly 2,000 active and idle oil and gas wells.

More than 580,000 LA City residents live within one-quarter mile of a productive oil and gas well. Scientific evidence shows that nearby oil and gas drilling operations can cause premature death. A host of ailments including, cancer, liver and kidney damage, neurological, cardiovascular and respiratory problems, low birth weights and birth defects have been attributed to oil and gas industries operations.

Communities of color host the majority of these oil and gas wells and continue to suffer greater health risks. In LA County, 44 percent of Black residents, 37 percent of Latino residents and 48 percent of Asian residents live near oil and gas wells, compared to 31 percent of Caucasian residents.

According to a report by the FracTracker Alliance, Governor Newsom approved 10,212 oil drilling permits since he assumed office in 2019, mainly in communities of color.

In January, the Los Angeles City Council voted unanimously to prohibit the drilling of new oil and gas wells, phase out production of existing oil and gas wells and create a process for the phase-out and cleanup of existing oil wells, with a just transition.

Culver City voted in June of 2021 to phase out oil and gas production, enact a just transition for industry workers and require the cleanup of well sites in the city’s portion of the Inglewood Oil Field within five years.

The Inglewood Oil Field is the largest contiguous urban oil field in the U.S., with more than one million people living within five miles of the site. Jurisdiction over the Inglewood Oil Field is split between Culver City and Los Angeles County. On average, the field produces 2.5 – 3.1 million barrels of oil yearly on about 1,100 acres. Approximately 10 percent (78 acres) was located within the limits of Culver City.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.