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SHIPPING CONTAINERS IN Boulder CO

Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. Boulder, CO, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you with the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

Whether you need shipping containers for storage, office, moving, multi-purpose or custom use, we've got your back.

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STORAGE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Boulder CO

When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in Boulder, CO, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

Our certified experts modify containers to fit any of your business needs or events.

Our shipping container modifications can help improve or expand your business. We can customize containers to any size you need, so you can rest easy knowing you have enough space for your inventory, documents, equipment or services.

Here's why you should choose us for your container modifications:

  • We offer the highest quality modifications on the market.
  • Our certified fabricators have years of combined experience in container modifications. No other company in the industry matches our expertise.
  • We have modified thousands of containers over the past 25 years for foreign and domestic clients.
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  • We can build multiple projects simultaneously in our 90,000 sq ft fabrication facility with consistent quality and a fast turnaround.
  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
  • Even after your custom container has been delivered, we still have your back. Our full-service staff can provide maintenance and quick modifications at your location.
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CONTAINERS SOLUTIONS IN Boulder CO

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STORAGE & OFFICES

When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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CONSTRUCTION
STORAGE & OFFICES

We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in Boulder, CO, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our shipping containers for rental, sale and modification in Boulder, CO, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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MOBILE OFFICE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Boulder CO

Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

CONTAINER SIZES AND TYPES

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

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10' Single Door Container
15' Single Door Container
20' Single Door Container
24' Single Door Container
30' Single Door Container
40' Single Door Container
45' Single Door Container
SMS-Dual-Bay-Doors
24' Double Door Container
30' Double Door Container
40' Double Door Container

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

SMS-Office-Dual-window
10' Open Bay Offices
20' Open Bay Offices
40' Open Bay Offices
40' Office with Split Rooms
SMS-Office-Single-window-storage
20' Office/Storage Combo
24' Office/Storage Combo
40' Office/Storage Combo

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All of our storage containers come standard with dual-lock vault-like security.

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Up to six points for adding locks to your shipping container, including a high-security slide bolt for puck locks.

Extra-long lockbox to ensure you always have at least one lock keeping your mobile storage container safe from break-ins.

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No holes to ensure your rental shipping container is wind and watertight.

Our 14-gauge corrugated steel containers are stronger than other storage solutions like pods.

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Latest News in Boulder, CO

How to get ready for game day

The CU Buffs football team will take on the Stanford Cardinal this weekend at Folsom Field. Whether you’re on campus for the game, attending a watch party or cheering from home, here are some tips to get ready for game day this Family Weekend.Check out Family Weekend events Whether or not your family is in town this weekend, you can check out special events and things to do on campus and in Boulder. Th...

The CU Buffs football team will take on the Stanford Cardinal this weekend at Folsom Field. Whether you’re on campus for the game, attending a watch party or cheering from home, here are some tips to get ready for game day this Family Weekend.

Check out Family Weekend events

Whether or not your family is in town this weekend, you can check out special events and things to do on campus and in Boulder. There will not be a Student Game Day Huddle this weekend to make room for Family Weekend of events.

Please note that students entering the game with their Sports Pass ticket will need to sit in the student section at Folsom Field. If your family purchased tickets for the game, each person with a purchased ticket will need to sit in the seat assigned on the ticket. Families will not be permitted to sit in the student section.

Get organized

If you’re attending the game at Folsom Field, here are some things to know before game day:

Visit the CU Athletics website

Be respectful and considerate

Remember that you’re a Buff wherever you are. Whether you’re watching the game at Folsom Field, a local restaurant or a friend’s house off campus, be considerate and respectful to those around you. Buffs stand shoulder to shoulder and value honor, respect and integrity. Make sure you’re welcoming fans, new and old, treating everyone with dignity and celebrating responsibly.

If you’re off campus, be mindful of noise levels. Excessive noise at any time of the day can result in a nuisance ticket—a common citation that can be avoided. You can also be fined if there is trash in your yard or around your property.

Learn more about behaviors that could cost you

Look out for yourselves and each other

We can all do our part to look out for fellow Buffs, both on and off campus.

2023 Colorado football schedule: Dates, times, TV channels, scores

First-year coach Deion Sanders has quickly molded Colorado into must-see TV, attracting College GameDay and celebrities alike to Boulder.With the Pac-12 gauntlet now underway for Coach Prime, here’s a look at dates, times and everything you need to know about the Colorado football schedule.OPPONENT SCORE DATE TIME (ET) TV LOCATION at No. 17 TCU W, 48-45...

First-year coach Deion Sanders has quickly molded Colorado into must-see TV, attracting College GameDay and celebrities alike to Boulder.

With the Pac-12 gauntlet now underway for Coach Prime, here’s a look at dates, times and everything you need to know about the Colorado football schedule.

OPPONENTSCOREDATETIME (ET)TVLOCATION
at No. 17 TCUW, 48-45Saturday, Sept. 212 p.m.FOXFort Worth, Texas
vs. NebraskaW, 36-14Saturday, Sept. 912 p.m.FOXBoulder, Colo.
vs. Colorado StateW, 43-35 (2OT)Saturday. Sept. 1610 p.m.ESPNBoulder, Colo.
at No. 10 Oregon L, 42-6Saturday, Sept. 233:30 p.m.ABCEugene, Ore.
vs. No. 8 USCL, 48-41Saturday, Sept. 3012 p.m.FOXBoulder, Colo.
at Arizona StateW, 27-24Saturday, Oct. 66:30 p.m.PAC-12 NetworksTempe, Ariz.
vs. StanfordL, 46-43 (2OT)Friday, Oct. 1310 p.m.ESPNBoulder, Colo.
at No. 25 UCLA--Saturday, Oct. 28TBDTBDLos Angeles, Calif.
vs. Oregon State--Saturday, Nov. 4TBDTBDBoulder, Colo.
vs. Arizona--Saturday, Nov. 11TBDTBDBoulder, Colo.
at Washington State--Friday, Nov. 1710:30 p.m.FS1Tuscon, Ariz.
at Utah--Saturday, Nov. 25TBDTBDSalt Lake City, Utah

Click or tap here to see the latest PAC-12 football standings.

Keep track of where the Buffs fall in the national rankings rankings here.

CU has already surpassed their win total from last season. Here's a look at how Colorado has improved in Sanders' first season.

OPPONENTSCOREDATETIME (ET)TVLOCATION
vs. Texas ChristianL, 13-38Friday, Sept. 210 p.m.ESPNBoulder, Colo
at Air ForceL, 10-41Saturday, Sept. 103:30 p.m.CBSColorado Springs, Colo.
at MinnesotaL, 7-49Saturday. Sept. 173:30 p.m.ESPN2Minneapolis, Minn.
vs. UCLAL, 17-45Saturday, Sept. 242 p.m.PAC-12 NetworkBoulder, Colo.
at ArizonaL, 20-43Saturday, Oct. 19:30 p.m.PAC-12 NetworkTuscon, Ariz.
vs. CalW, 20-13 (OT)Saturday, Oct. 152 p.m.PAC-12 NetworkBoulder, Colo.
at Oregon StateL, 9-42Saturday, Oct. 228 p.m.PAC-12 NetworkCorvallis, Ore.
vs. Arizona StateL, 34-42Saturday, Oct. 297:30 p.m.ESPNUBoulder, Colo.
vs. OregonL, 10-49Saturday, Nov. 53:30 p.m.ESPNBoulder, Colo.
at USCL, 17-55Friday, Nov. 119:30 p.m.FS1Los Angeles, Calif
at WashingtonL, 7-54Saturday, Nov. 199 p.m.PAC-12 NetworkSeattle, Wash.
vs. UtahL, 63-21Saturday, Nov. 264 p.m.PAC-12 NetworkBoulder, Colo

Video: Analysis of Colorado’s stunning 2-OT loss to Stanford

...

SEC media panel picks No. 9 Tennessee to win league, Texas A&M’s Taylor as preseason player of year

Tennessee is the favorite to win the Southeastern Conference men’s basketball title and Texas A&M’s Wade Taylor IV is preseason player of the year, according to votes compiled by the league.

Big 12 women’s hoops tourney poised to join men’s event at glitzy T-Mobile Center

The Big 12 women’s basketball tournament will be played at the T-Mobile Center in Kansas City the week before the men’s event beginning this season.

Defending champion LSU is No. 1 in women’s preseason AP Top 25 for first time. UConn, Iowa next

LSU is ranked No. 1 in the preseason AP Top 25 women’s basketball poll for the first time in school history.

LSU All-American Angel Reese signs endorsement deal with Reebok

LSU All-American Angel Reese has a new endorsement deal with a major shoe and athletic apparel company.

Big 12 expects to play 20-game schedule in men’s hoops, 18 games for women next season

The Big 12 is preparing to play a 20-game conference schedule in men’s basketball, and an 18-game women’s schedule, when the league loses Texas and Oklahoma but welcomes four additions from the Pac-12 beginning next season.

Kansas is No. 1 in the preseason men’s AP Top 25; Duke, Purdue next as 5 teams get first-place votes

Kansas is the preseason No. 1 in the AP men’s college basketball poll. The Jayhawks received 46 of 63 first-place votes to outdistance second-place Duke and third-place Purdue.

Clark’s triple-double highlights game at Kinnick. Women’s basketball record crowd of 55,646 shows up

A total of 55,646 fans turned out in Iowa City for the “Crossover at Kinnick” women’s basketball exhibition between DePaul and Iowa.

Haley Cavinder enters transfer portal, AP source says. She played at Miami last season

A person with knowledge of the move says Haley Cavinder has entered the transfer portal. She is one of the most recognizable players in the name, image and likeness era of college athletics.

Bronny James is ‘doing well,’ USC coach Andy Enfield says at Pac-12 media day

Southern California basketball coach Andy Enfield said Bronny James, the oldest son of NBA superstar LeBron James, is “doing well” nearly three months after the prized recruit went into cardiac arrest while participating in a practice on campus.

Kansas escapes postseason ban, major penalties as panel downgrades basketball violations

An independent panel has downgraded five Level I violations lodged by the NCAA against Kansas and basketball coach Bill Self.

Pac-12 teams still interested in playing each other even as they go separate ways

Pac-12 Conference basketball coaches are still interested in playing teams on the West Coast after this season. Ten of the 12 schools will leave for other conferences.

Michigan coach Juwan Howard, in recovery mode, has a heart surgery friend in Nebraska’s Fred Hoiberg

Nebraska head coach Fred Hoiberg recently connected with Michigan head coach Juwan Howard, to offer advice and encouragement.

Purdue is favored to win the Big Ten again. Can the Boilermakers end the league’s March trouble?

The Big Ten got an unexpected boost in the offseason when Zach Edey decided to return to Purdue for his senior year.

Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer laments ‘heartbreaking’ breakup of Pac-12

Stanford coach Tara VanDerveer says it’s “heartbreaking” and “a nightmare” for the Cardinal to be leaving the Pac-12.

Big Ten presents rugged road for newcomers Fralick at Michigan State, Plitzuweit at Minnesota

The Big Ten is again expected to be one of the toughest conferences in the country this season. A league-record-tying seven teams made the NCAA Tournament in 2023.

Atlanta Dream guard Rhyne Howard to join Florida’s coaching staff during the WNBA’s offseason

Atlanta Dream guard Rhyne Howard now has a second job. Howard formally joined Florida’s coaching staff and will be on the bench of a college competitor and her mother’s alma mater.

Ohio State added transfer Celeste Taylor to a well-stocked team in a stacked-again Big Ten

The ideal approach to sustained success for Ohio State revolves around recruiting players straight from high school and developing them over four or five seasons.

Dartmouth tells NLRB that basketball players are students - for real - not employees

Dartmouth College lawyers say the Ivy League school’s basketball players shouldn’t be considered employees because they are unpaid members of a money-losing program whose need-based scholarships don’t depend on their participation or talent.

Iowa women’s basketball enjoys big surge in popularity with run to title game and Clark’s return

Playing in a national championship game that attracted a record television audience and bringing back the star player who transcends the sport has taken Iowa women’s basketball to unprecedented levels of popularity in the state.

Kentucky’s John Calipari to receive Legends of Coaching Award

John Calipari of Kentucky will receive the John R. Wooden Award Legends of Coaching honor. Wooden’s grandson, Greg Wooden, announced his selection Tuesday.

South Carolina to host Wofford in charity exhibition game to help those affected by Maui wildfires

South Carolina will play Wofford in a men’s basketball charity exhibition game on Nov. 1 to raise funds for those affected by the fatal Maui wildfires this past summer.

LeBron James says Bronny is doing well, working to play for USC this season after cardiac episode

LeBron James says his 18-year-old son is progressing in his rehabilitation from cardiac arrest in hopes of playing for the University of Southern California this season.

UConn center Donovan Clingan to miss a month with a foot injury

UConn has announced that center Donovan Clingan injured his right foot in practice this week and is expected to be sidelined for about a month.

Kansas guard Arterio Morris charged with rape, dismissed from men’s basketball team

Kansas basketball player Arterio Morris was charged Friday with one count of rape and dismissed from the Jayhawks’ men’s basketball program.

South Carolina’s Dawn Staley has work ahead with a new group of players

South Carolina opened its preseason camp without the talented and accomplished group of players led by All-Americans Aliyah Boston and Zia Cooke.

Rutgers, South Carolina women’s hoops teams to play exhibition to honor late Nikki McCray-Penson

South Carolina will host Rutgers in an exhibition game on Oct. 22 dedicated to the late Nikki McCray-Penson, who had been an assistant on both staffs.

CU Boulder experts offer solar eclipse preparation tips ahead of Saturday

A rare solar eclipse will pass over Colorado on Saturday morning, giving viewers a chance to see a “ring of fire” as the moon blocks most of the sun’s light.John Keller, director of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium, said people anywhere in Colorado will be able see the eclipse, which will create a “ring of fire” in the sky.The eclipse will begin around 9 a.m. Saturday, peak at around 10:30 a.m. and be completed around noon. The Fiske Planetarium will host an eclipse view...

A rare solar eclipse will pass over Colorado on Saturday morning, giving viewers a chance to see a “ring of fire” as the moon blocks most of the sun’s light.

John Keller, director of the University of Colorado Boulder’s Fiske Planetarium, said people anywhere in Colorado will be able see the eclipse, which will create a “ring of fire” in the sky.

The eclipse will begin around 9 a.m. Saturday, peak at around 10:30 a.m. and be completed around noon. The Fiske Planetarium will host an eclipse viewing party open to the public on the Norlin Quad at CU Boulder’s campus from 9:30 a.m. to noon.

A solar eclipse happens when the moon’s orbit overlaps the sun in the sky, causing part or all of the sun to be blocked. Saturday’s event is a partial eclipse, and slivers of the sun will still be visible. Keller said eclipses are a cool phenomenon because although the sun is 400 times bigger than the moon, it’s also 400 times farther away, giving the illusion they’re the same size and allowing the moon to block the sun during an eclipse.

Doug Duncan, astronomer and former director of the Fiske Planetarium, said people need to purchase protective eyewear if they want to watch the eclipse safely. The sun, although mostly obscured, is still powerful enough to blind someone who looks directly at it.

Eclipse glasses are available at hardware stores or local science centers. Duncan recommended McGuckin Hardware in Boulder which, in addition to eclipse glasses, also carries an invention Duncan created called the Solar Snap, which is a filter people can put over their phone to take pictures of the eclipse.

With the glasses, Duncan said, the eclipse will look like “a little black bite has been taken out of the sun.”

Keller said people can also use pinhole projectors to view the eclipse indirectly. A pinhole projector is when light travels through a hole and reflects on the ground. People can make one using paper or cardboard, or use household items with many holes, like a colander. The light will shine through the colander and many little eclipses will shine through on the ground.

The same effect also happens with trees. The sunlight that shines through the trees will create images of the eclipse on the ground.

“They’ll see hundreds of little eclipse suns in the shadows of trees,” Keller said.

Duncan also recommended bringing water and sunscreen, and to watch the eclipse in a place with the ability to go inside and outside since the eclipse is a few hours long. If people do purchase the eclipse glasses or get the phone filter device, Duncan said to keep it for future eclipses such as the rare total eclipse that will cross parts of the United States in April.

Eclipses happen somewhere on earth about twice a year, but in narrow sections of the planet. Viewing an eclipse multiple times in one place is more rare.

“If you stay in one place and wait for the eclipse to come to you, it’s a couple of decades for a partial eclipse and a couple of hundred years for a total eclipse,” Duncan said.

Keller said he is “super psyched” about the eclipse. He said it’s cool that the alignment of sun and moon works so that eclipses happen and it’s something all of North America can see.

“I would encourage people to take some time to appreciate it. We have a good sky over our heads and this is just one of many astronomical phenomena going on, but definitely be safe,” Keller said.

Boulder Buys First Electric Fire Engine

Purchase represents significant step toward improved safety for first responders and a positive contribution to community climate goals.The City of Boulder is excited to announce that Boulder Fire-Rescue has purchased a Rosenbauer RTX fire engine, the first electric vehicle of its kind in Colorado.The new fire engine will have many state-of-the-art features that better support firefighters, our community, and the environment. The RTX is considered a Range Extended Electric Vehicle (REEV), meaning it has an all-electric...

Purchase represents significant step toward improved safety for first responders and a positive contribution to community climate goals.

The City of Boulder is excited to announce that Boulder Fire-Rescue has purchased a Rosenbauer RTX fire engine, the first electric vehicle of its kind in Colorado.

The new fire engine will have many state-of-the-art features that better support firefighters, our community, and the environment. The RTX is considered a Range Extended Electric Vehicle (REEV), meaning it has an all-electric drivetrain and pump with a diesel energy backup system. This new technology will allow the city to fight fires while safeguarding air quality and reducing climate-warming emissions.

The purchase also represents a broader movement to go electric that goes beyond personal vehicles to include larger, more powerful machines, including emergency vehicles that must be reliable and able to perform under challenging conditions.

“This is a tremendous step forward for our community and yet another example of Boulder’s leadership in addressing climate change,” said City Manager Nuria Rivera-Vandermyde. “We’re proud to be an early adopter of new technology that makes emergency response both safer and environmentally friendly. The collaboration among departments – Fire-Rescue, Fleet & Facilities, and Climate Initiatives – has been exceptional and is an example of how we can address today’s challenges when we work together.”

The electric engine not only helps advance Boulder's mission to address climate change, but also presents an opportunity to better serve the needs of an increasingly diverse firefighting workforce. The RTX engine was created with the primary goal of improving occupational safety for all firefighters. Improvements include an adjustable suspension that offers lower equipment and cab access heights, all-wheel drive and all-wheel steering for increased maneuverability on the road, an ergonomically designed cab space, reduced exposure to carcinogenic fumes, and a significant reduction in operational noise.

“Boulder Fire-Rescue has been very intentional and thorough in the process of researching and developing a plan for this engine,” said Travis Richen, administrative battalion chief. “We’ve ensured that the equipment will be dependable and capable while also developing a better understanding about all the safety benefits the engine offers. This purchase gives us an amazing chance to shape the next generation of fire apparatus.”

Boulder anticipates delivery of this engine late 2024 to early 2025, though the actual timeline may vary slightly, and will be determined as the build-out progresses. During this time, Boulder Fire-Rescue firefighters and Rosenbauer will work together closely to ensure that the new engine meets the needs of Boulder firefighters and the community they serve. The estimated cost of this engine is currently at approximately 1.78 million. The money has been saved up over time from the department’s budget to replace the fleet as necessary. Nearly all of Boulder Fire-Rescue’s budget is from the General Fund, made possible through sales and use tax collections.

“I care deeply about the safety and well-being of our firefighters, and I’m excited about the next steps we are taking to better support them, while also helping achieve several city goals,” said Boulder Fire-Rescue Chief Michael Calderazzo. “This option is a win-win.”

For more information about Rosenbauer's RTX, visit https://rosenbaueramerica.com/rosenbauer-revolutionary-technology/

About Rosenbauer America: Rosenbauer is the world's leading manufacturer of firefighting vehicles and equipment. Rosenbauer America incorporates global strengths and innovation to provide the largest and most technologically advanced line of custom and commercial pumpers, rescues, tankers, aerials, and the all-new Revolutionary Technology (RTX) electric fire truck. Visit the company's website for more information at www.rosenbaueramerica.com

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Best Internet Providers in Boulder, Colorado

I grew up just north of Boulder, Colorado, so I’m biased, but I believe it to be one of the country's most unique, beautiful cities. Some might know it as the home of the Colorado Buffaloes college football team, but it can also brag about the speed of its internet connections relative to the rest of the state.If you live in Boulder (or plan to move there), you have a handful of options, but the two most widely available internet service providers are Xfinity and CenturyLink. CNET’s pick for the best overall intern...

I grew up just north of Boulder, Colorado, so I’m biased, but I believe it to be one of the country's most unique, beautiful cities. Some might know it as the home of the Colorado Buffaloes college football team, but it can also brag about the speed of its internet connections relative to the rest of the state.

If you live in Boulder (or plan to move there), you have a handful of options, but the two most widely available internet service providers are Xfinity and CenturyLink. CNET’s pick for the best overall internet service provider in Boulder is Xfinity due to its extensive coverage across the city and wide selection of plans. Other options include CenturyLink, which is also widely available but offers only slower DSL plans, fiber plans from Quantum Fiber and 5G home internet offerings from T-Mobile (and, to a lesser degree, Verizon).

Our methodology

CNET considers speeds, pricing, customer service and overall value to recommend the best internet service in Boulder across several categories. Our evaluation includes referencing a proprietary database built over years of reviewing internet services. We validate that against provider information by spot-checking local addresses for service availability. We also do a close read of providers' terms and conditions and, when needed, will call ISPs to verify the details.

Despite our efforts to find the most recent and accurate information, our process has some limitations you should know about. Pricing and speed data are variable: certain addresses may qualify for different service tiers, and monthly costs may vary, even within a city. The best way to identify your particular options is to plug your address into a provider's website.

Also, the prices, speed and other information listed above and in the provider cards below may differ from what we found in our research. The cards display the full range of a provider's pricing and speed across the US, according to our database of plan information provided directly by ISPs. At the same time, the text is specific to what's available in Boulder. The prices referenced within this article's text come from our research and include applicable discounts for setting up automatic payments each month -- a standard industry offering. Other discounts and promotions might also be available for things like signing a term contract or bundling with multiple services.

To learn more about how we review internet providers, visit our full methodology page.

Best internet in Boulder in 2023

Boulder residents can expect median download speeds of approximately 236 megabits per second, according to Ookla Speedtest data -- considerably faster than Colorado's statewide median (180Mbps) and the national median (210Mbps). Not too shabby.

Best internet provider in Boulder, CO

Read full review

Xfinity is a reliable cable internet provider offering fast download speeds and extensive service across most of the city. Its cable broadband generally scores above-average marks in customer satisfaction surveys, including the most recent American Customer Satisfaction Index report, and finished above average in three of four regions in the J.D. Power study for 2022. The one area where it didn’t? The East region, where Xfinity fell short of the average by one point but still placed second ahead of Cox, Frontier, Optimum and Spectrum.

Or call to order: (877) 498-5506

Check with Xfinity Show more details

Best fiber internet in Boulder, CO

Read full review

Lumen Technologies is the parent company of CenturyLink and Quantum Fiber, two broadband services available in Boulder. CenturyLink offers DSL connections to more than three-quarters of households in the area. At the same time, Quantum Fiber is a 100% fiber-optic service that offers much faster (and symmetrical) download and upload speeds. As noted in our CNET ISP reviews, fiber internet trumps cable connections, which best DSL services.

Or call to order: (877) 609-6623

Check with Quantum Show more details

Best fixed wireless internet in Boulder, CO

Read full review

T-Mobile's cellular network won't deliver speeds that match Xfinity or Quantum Fiber, but it should be adequate for households with three or fewer people. It also received the highest approval rating of any non-fiber provider in the US, according to the 2023 American Customer Satisfaction Index survey.

Or call to order: (877) 687-6988

Check with T-Mobile Show more details

Source: CNET analysis of provider data

Other available internet providers in Boulder

Though we think Xfinity, Quantum Fiber and T-Mobile are the best providers in the area, Boulder has other ISP options to consider.

Pricing info on Boulder home internet service

The average starting price for internet in Boulder is just under $42 per month -- less expensive than the national average but just a few dollars more per month than its bigger sibling to the south, Denver, which comes in at $39.

Cheap internet options in Boulder

The cheapest internet plan in Boulder is Xfinity’s Connect plan, which features max download speeds of 75Mbps for $20 per month. There are plenty of caveats, however: That promotional price lasts for only one year and doesn’t include an optional $15-per-month charge for equipment rental (which you can waive if you have your own modem and router).

T-Mobile Home Internet, which starts at $50 monthly, drops to $30 per month when you bundle an eligible cellphone plan, such as Go5G Plus and Magenta Max.

It's worth noting that you might get a discount on any of the plans. The federal government's Affordable Connectivity Program provides low-income households a $30 monthly discount on high-speed internet. Qualifying households will find that money fully covers some of the plans we list below.

Source: CNET analysis of provider data

Boulder broadband speeds

Just about all Boulder households have access to broadband internet speeds of 250Mbps down and 25Mbps upload. As we mentioned earlier, Boulder residents see much higher median download speeds than the rest of the state.

Source: CNET analysis of provider data

How CNET chose the best internet providers in Boulder

Internet service providers are numerous and regional. Unlike the latest smartphone, laptop, router or kitchen tool, it's impractical to personally test every ISP in a given city. So what's our approach? For starters, we tap into a proprietary database of pricing, availability and speed information that draws from our own historical ISP data, partner data and mapping information from the Federal Communications Commission at FCC.gov.

This guide leverages an in-house artificial intelligence tool called RAMP, which is trained on our own writing and uses our database to generate content about specific internet service providers that our writers can use in determining and presenting our picks for a given guide. Check CNET’s AI policy for more information about how our teams use (and don’t use) AI tools.

Because our database isn't exhaustive, we go to the FCC’s website to check the primary data for ourselves and make sure we’re considering every ISP that provides service in an area. Plans and prices also vary by location, so we input local addresses on provider websites to find the specific options available to residents. We look at sources, including the American Customer Satisfaction Index and J.D. Power, to evaluate how happy customers are with an ISP's service. ISP plans and prices are subject to frequent changes; all information provided is accurate as of our prepublication fact-check.

Once we have this localized information, we ask three main questions:

While the answer to those questions is often layered and complex, the providers who come closest to “yes” on all three are the ones we recommend. To explore our process in more depth, visit our how we test ISPs page.

What’s the bottom line on internet providers in Boulder?

Xfinity covers nearly every address in the city and features the widest array of plan choices of any provider in the area. That’s why it gets our nod for the best ISP in the city. However, Boulder households have other viable options, including fiber plans from Quantum Fiber and a fixed wireless connection from T-Mobile Home Internet.

Internet providers in Boulder: FAQs

News flash: Opposites don't actually attract

Despite some conventional wisdom to the contrary, opposites don’t actually attract.That’s the takeaway from a sweeping CU Boulder analysis of more than 130 traits and including millions of couples over more than a century.“Our findings demonstrate that birds of a feather are indeed more likely to flock together,” said first author Tanya Horwitz, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the...

Despite some conventional wisdom to the contrary, opposites don’t actually attract.

That’s the takeaway from a sweeping CU Boulder analysis of more than 130 traits and including millions of couples over more than a century.

“Our findings demonstrate that birds of a feather are indeed more likely to flock together,” said first author Tanya Horwitz, a doctoral candidate in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience and the Institute for Behavioral Genetics (IBG).

The study, published today in the journal “Nature Human Behaviour,” confirms what individual studies have hinted at for decades, defying the age-old adage that “opposites attract.”

Tanya Horwitz, first author and doctoral candidate

Matt Keller, senior author and director of the Institute for Behavioral Genetics

It found that for between 82% and 89% of traits analyzed—ranging from political leanings to age of first intercourse to substance use habits—partners were more likely than not to be similar.

For only 3% of traits, and only in one part of their analysis, did individuals tend to partner with those who were different than them.

Aside from shedding light on unseen forces that may shape human relationships, the research has important implications for the field of genetic research.

“A lot of models in genetics assume that human mating is random. This study shows this assumption is probably wrong,” said senior author and IBG Director Matt Keller, noting that what is known as “assortative mating”—when individuals with similar traits couple up—can skew findings of genetic studies.

Looking back more than a century

For the new paper, the authors conducted both a review, or meta-analysis, of previous research and their own original data analysis.

For the meta-analysis, they looked at 22 traits across 199 studies including millions of male-female co-parents, engaged pairs, married pairs or cohabitating pairs. The oldest study was conducted in 1903.

In addition, they used a dataset called the UK Biobank to study 133 traits, including many that are seldom studied, across almost 80,000 opposite-sex pairs in the United Kingdom.

Same sex couples were not included in the research. Because the patterns there may differ significantly, the authors are now exploring those separately.

Across both analyses, traits like political and religious attitudes, level of education, and certain measures of IQ showed particularly high correlations. For instance, on a scale in which zero means there is no correlation and 1 means couples always share the trait, the correlation for political values was .58.

Traits around substance use also showed high correlations, with heavy smokers, heavy drinkers and teetotalers tending strongly to partner up with those with similar habits.

Meanwhile, traits like height and weight, medical conditions and personality traits showed far lower but still positive correlations. For instance, the correlation for neurotocism was .11.

For some traits, like extroversion, there was not much of a correlation at all.

“People have all these theories that extroverts like introverts or extroverts like other extroverts, but the fact of the matter is that it’s about like flipping a coin: Extroverts are similarly likely to end up with extroverts as with introverts,” said Horwitz.

Rarely, opposites may attract

In the meta-analysis, the researchers found “no compelling evidence” on any trait that opposites attract. In the UK Biobank sample, they did find a handful of traits in which there seemed to be a negative correlation, albeit small.

Those included: chronotype (whether someone is a “morning lark” or “night owl”), tendency to worry and hearing difficulty.

More research must be done to unpack those findings, they said.

The trait for which couples were most likely to be similar was, not surprisingly, birth year.

But even seldom-studied traits, like how many sexual partners a person had had or whether they had been breastfed as a child, showed some correlation.

“These findings suggest that even in situations where we feel like we have a choice about our relationships, there may be mechanisms happening behind the scenes of which we aren't fully aware,” said Horwitz.

Next-generation implications

The authors note that couples share traits for a variety of reasons: Some grow up in the same area. Some are attracted to people who are similar to them. Some grow more similar the longer they are together.

Depending on the cause, there could be downstream consequences.

For example, Horwitz explains, if short people are more likely to produce offspring with short people and tall people with tall people, there could be more people at the height extremes in the next generation. The same goes for psychiatric, medical or other traits.

There could also be social implications.

For instance, some small previous studies have suggested that people in the U.S. are growing more likely to couple up with people with similar educational backgrounds—a trend that, some theorize, could widen the socioeconomic divide.

Notably, the new study also showed that the strength of correlations for traits differed across populations. They likely also change over time, they suspect.

The researchers caution that the correlations they found were fairly modest and should not be overstated or misused to promote an agenda (Horwitz points out that assortative mating research was, tragically, co-opted by the eugenics movement).

They do hope the study will spark more research across disciplines, from economics to sociology to anthropology and psychology.

“We’re hoping people can use this data to do their own analyses and learn more about how and why people end up in the relationships they do,” she said.

New observations of flares from distant star could help in search for habitable planets

Artist's depiction of the TRAPPIST-1 system. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)Astrophysicists have used the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to take a close look at a volatile star.In a new study, an international team of researchers has made a detailed investigation of four solar flares exploding from around the star TRAPPIST-1—a small and active celestial body located about 40 light-years from Earth. The findings could help scientists search for far away pla...

Artist's depiction of the TRAPPIST-1 system. (Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech)

Astrophysicists have used the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to take a close look at a volatile star.

In a new study, an international team of researchers has made a detailed investigation of four solar flares exploding from around the star TRAPPIST-1—a small and active celestial body located about 40 light-years from Earth. The findings could help scientists search for far away planets, or “exoplanets,” that resemble our own and may even support life.

“Because of JWST, it is the first time in history that we’ve been able to look for planets around other stars that have the sorts of secondary atmospheres you could find around, say, Earth, Venus or Mars,” said Ward Howard, lead author of the new research and a NASA Sagan Fellow in the Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at CU Boulder.

That hunt, however, can get a little tricky.

Howard explained that most of the small and rocky worlds that scientists are planning to explore with the Webb telescope orbit a class of stars called M-dwarfs, or red dwarfs. They are some of the most explosive stars in the galaxy. Take TRAPPIST-1, which hosts seven known planets. This star is barely bigger than Jupiter, but it shoots out large flares, or bright and powerful eruptions of energy, several times a day, spreading radiation far into space. Earth’s sun, in contrast, experiences similarly sized flares only about once a month.

As a result, viewing a planet around a red dwarf can be a bit like snapping a photo of a friend in a dance club with pulsing lights.

In their new research, Howard and his colleagues think they’ve discovered a partial solution. Using the Webb telescope, the most advanced telescope ever launched into space, the team recorded a series of flares bursting from TRAPPIST-1 over roughly 27 hours. The researchers developed a mathematical method for separating the light coming from those flares from the star’s normal radiation. It’s a bit like using a filter to remove the glare from a smartphone photo.

The result? Potentially clearer images of planets, and their atmospheres.

“If we want to learn more about exoplanets ,” Howard said, “it’s really important to understand their stars.”

The study has been accepted for publication in The Astrophysical Journal and posted online ahead of print. The observations used in the research were obtained in the telescope’s first year of operation by Olivia Lim and David Lafrenière at the University of Montreal as part of an effort called the NEAT Collaboration.

Precious planets

Scientists have had their eyes on TRAPPIST-1 for a long time.

This star, which isn’t too far from Earth in galactic terms, is a planetary gold mine: It hosts three small and rocky worlds that rest in what researchers call the “habitable zone”—a region around a star in which water could, theoretically, exist on the surface of a planet. Astrophysicists are using the Webb telescope to see if they can sniff out the traces of an atmosphere around these planets. (Lim led a recent study that didn’t detect traces of atmosphere around one planet in the system called TRAPPIST-1 b).

“There are only a handful of stellar systems where we have the opportunity to look for these sorts of atmospheres,” Howard said. “Each one of these planets is truly precious.”

Howard noted that because exoplanets like TRAPPIST-1’s seven worlds are so far away, astrophysicists can only observe them as they pass in front of their bright stars. But when a star is as chaotic as TRAPPIST-1, that becomes difficult.

“If you don’t account for flares, you could detect molecules in the atmosphere that aren’t really there, or get the amount of material in the atmosphere wrong,” he said.

Sharper observations

That’s one reason why Howard and his colleagues wanted to take such a close look at TRAPPIST-1.

Using the Webb telescope, the researchers observed flares from a distant star for the first time ever in certain wavelengths of infrared light—a type of radiation that the Webb telescope is especially attuned to see. The team’s data capture the evolution of those four flares in exquisite detail as they evolved over several hours, growing brighter and brighter, then peaking and becoming dim again.

The group was also able to tease apart the light coming from TRAPPIST-1’s flares from the star’s day-to-day glow. Drawing on that data, the team was able to remove about 80% of the light from the flares from their observations.

Those numbers aren’t perfect, Howard noted, but the team’s results should help astrophysicists collect clearer and more accurate data on TRAPPIST-1’s seven planets. And the researchers could apply their same approach to other similar star systems close to Earth.

“With TRAPPIST-1, we have a really great opportunity to see what an Earth-sized planet around a red dwarf would look like,” Howard said.

CU Boulder co-authors on the new study include Adam Kowalski, assistant professor in the Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and an astrophysicist at the National Solar Observatory; Alexander Brown, senior research fellow in the Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy (CASA); and Meredith MacGregor, formerly an assistant professor of astrophysics at CU Boulder now at Johns Hopkins University. Other co-authors include researchers at the University of Montreal, Cornell University, Space Telescope Science Institute, University of Victoria and McGill University.

City of Boulder expands shared e-scooters citywide beginning in August 2023

BOULDER, Colo. — The City of Boulder, in partnership with the University of Colorado Boulder and Lime, is expanding shared e-scooter usage citywide.The expansion follows a successful e-scooter pilot program in parts of East Boulder, Gunbarrel and CU Boulder's East Ca...

BOULDER, Colo. — The City of Boulder, in partnership with the University of Colorado Boulder and Lime, is expanding shared e-scooter usage citywide.

The expansion follows a successful e-scooter pilot program in parts of East Boulder, Gunbarrel and CU Boulder's East Campus. The pilot evaluation, which included community engagement, showed that shared e-scooters help to reduce traffic congestion, reduce air pollution, increase mobility options and serve as first- and final-mile connections to transit. Proposed program changes were broadly supported by Boulder City Council, boards and commissions and stakeholders.

Painting and signage to indicate required parking zones, or Lime Groves, will start as early as this week. By Aug. 31, Lime will triple the current fleet size to 900 total e-scooters to meet projected demand corresponding with the geographic expansion of the program to city limits, approximately three times the pilot program area.

The city is taking steps to encourage safe use of e-scooters, which is a priority for this program. Key safety guidelines include:

Additionally, Lime has implemented tools geared toward safe use of e-scooters, including location-based technology, that will automatically:

E-scooter misuse should be reported directly to Lime. Contact information is posted on all Lime e-scooters. Lime will respond to reports within two hours.

The expansion is part of the city’s Shared Micromobility Program, a partnership with the University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder County, the Boulder Chamber, Lime and BCycle. The program supports Boulder’s transportation and climate goals by providing convenient, equitable and sustainable ways for community members to live, work and play around Boulder without a car.

“By providing shared e-scooters and e-bikes, our micromobility program aims to make it easier for our community to get around town, bringing the city closer to its transportation and climate goals to provide travel choices and support clean air,” said City of Boulder Transportation and Mobility Director, Natalie Stiffler. “We're excited to bring this convenient transportation option to the whole city.”

"We're thrilled to be expanding in Boulder and we're working hand in hand with the city and the university to ensure we keep up the same focus on safe riding and proper parking that has made our shared electric vehicles here a success so far,” said Lime General Manager, US Rockies Cody Noblin. “Our goal is to help the city and the university meet its climate and transportation goals by offering people a safe, affordable, and sustainable way to get around. We're proud Boulder residents, students, and visitors have enjoyed the green transit options our e-scooters offer, and we look forward to growing the program while maintaining our strong safety and parking records."

“We continue to expand our sustainable transportation offerings as part of our overall sustainability goals,” said CU Boulder Vice Chancellor for Infrastructure and Sustainability Chris Ewing. “Four of our Buff Buses are electric, we offer a vanpool program, BCycle is very popular with our students, and now e-scooters will be an option to get to, from and around campus.”

In the coming months, the city and its partners will also launch a campaign to raise awareness about the program. Learn more about shared e-scooters and e-bikes, including safety tips and frequently asked questions, on the city’s website.

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