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SHIPPING CONTAINERS IN Longmont CO

Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. Longmont, CO, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you with the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

Whether you need shipping containers for storage, office, moving, multi-purpose or custom use, we've got your back.

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STORAGE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Longmont CO

When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in Longmont, CO, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

Our certified experts modify containers to fit any of your business needs or events.

Our shipping container modifications can help improve or expand your business. We can customize containers to any size you need, so you can rest easy knowing you have enough space for your inventory, documents, equipment or services.

Here's why you should choose us for your container modifications:

  • We offer the highest quality modifications on the market.
  • Our certified fabricators have years of combined experience in container modifications. No other company in the industry matches our expertise.
  • We have modified thousands of containers over the past 25 years for foreign and domestic clients.
  • Our certified weld and quality control inspectors ensure everything is structurally sound and built to your specifications through every step of the process.
  • We can build multiple projects simultaneously in our 90,000 sq ft fabrication facility with consistent quality and a fast turnaround.
  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
  • Even after your custom container has been delivered, we still have your back. Our full-service staff can provide maintenance and quick modifications at your location.
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COMMERCIAL MOBILE
STORAGE & OFFICES

When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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CONSTRUCTION
STORAGE & OFFICES

We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in Longmont, CO, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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RESIDENTIAL
STORAGE CONTAINERS

Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our shipping containers for rental, sale and modification in Longmont, CO, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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MOBILE OFFICE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Longmont CO

Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

CONTAINER SIZES AND TYPES

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

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10' Single Door Container
15' Single Door Container
20' Single Door Container
24' Single Door Container
30' Single Door Container
40' Single Door Container
45' Single Door Container
SMS-Dual-Bay-Doors
24' Double Door Container
30' Double Door Container
40' Double Door Container

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

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10' Open Bay Offices
20' Open Bay Offices
40' Open Bay Offices
40' Office with Split Rooms
SMS-Office-Single-window-storage
20' Office/Storage Combo
24' Office/Storage Combo
40' Office/Storage Combo

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All of our storage containers come standard with dual-lock vault-like security.

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Standard delivery is within 3-5 days of order. If you need it sooner, we'll do our best to accommodate.

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Up to six points for adding locks to your shipping container, including a high-security slide bolt for puck locks.

Extra-long lockbox to ensure you always have at least one lock keeping your mobile storage container safe from break-ins.

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No holes to ensure your rental shipping container is wind and watertight.

Our 14-gauge corrugated steel containers are stronger than other storage solutions like pods.

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Shop and compare. When it comes to quality, delivery, security and service, you won't find a better value.

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High security, multi-point locking systems come standard on all our rental containers at no additional cost.

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90,000 sq ft indoor fabrication center and certified experts with more than 500 years combined experience in customized container modification.

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Latest News in Longmont, CO

New thrift store for retro enthusiasts opens its time machine doors

Just a block away from the main drag, Longmont’s newest gem Omnia Vintage Thrift & Collectables isn't merely a shop, it's a time capsule, a treasure chest brimming with an eclectic collection of memorabilia from yesteryears.In Longmont, Omnia Vintage distinguishes i...

Just a block away from the main drag, Longmont’s newest gem Omnia Vintage Thrift & Collectables isn't merely a shop, it's a time capsule, a treasure chest brimming with an eclectic collection of memorabilia from yesteryears.

In Longmont, Omnia Vintage distinguishes itself from conventional thrift stores by specializing in retro collectibles. At a lively intersection of past and present, visitors can expect to find treasures ranging from vintage t-shirts from the 80s, 90s, and 00s to Magic the Gathering cards, antiques, vintage toys, vinyl records, comic books and just about anything the mind can imagine.

The store's location, which is a little off the beaten path on Eleventh Avenue and Kimbark Street, may mean residents won't stumble upon it during a regular stroll down Main Street. But the owners aren't counting on foot traffic. They're confident in their excellent collection, aiming to win customers over by reputation, quality and the uniqueness of their offerings.

Josie and Daniel Hastings’ journey began with a simple, humble garage sale, but as the same faces kept returning to the requisite garage sales, the couple recognized a potential opportunity. They may not have envisioned a future in the world of thrift stores, but their unexpected ability to find nostalgic collectibles compelled them to venture into this realm.

"We started noticing we could perhaps build a customer base based on what we were trying to sell," Josie Hastings explained.

Her fondness for thrift shopping was a hobby cultivated during her youth when she accompanied family and friends on shopping trips.

"The old Savers in Boulder was my stomping ground. In this area, thrift stores are really popular. I was raised on repurposed clothing and items, and it's funny how these things carry on into adulthood," she said.

The couple noticed one drawback in larger thrift stores, however: having to sift through a myriad of items to unearth those hidden gems. This observation inspired their vision for Omnia Vintage. The aim was to create a store that catered to all generations, offering both retro and vintage clothing alongside genuine collectible items, thus saving their customers the trouble of excessive rummaging.

"I like the treasure side of it," Daniel Hastings said. "I love learning about the hidden stories, the intricate details that make every item unique."

Daniel’s enthusiasm is infectious as he described his interest in learning about the items they acquire. A case in point is an original Tool vinyl album “10,000 Days” a piece that stood out due to its limited legit releases among many bootlegs.

"In the beginning, there were only a few legitimate releases of this album," Daniel explained. "Most of the ones you find are bootlegs, but there are some exceptions. For example, some albums have a label saying 'For promotional use only. Not for resale.' This means some DJ got it directly from the record company. Discovering little details like that is just fun."

This spirit of curiosity and learning infuses the store, and every item carries a history, a story and an exceptionality that they are eager to uncover. The Hastings' passion is evident in the depth and quality of the items in their collection. Each piece is carefully chosen, bringing together a wide array of nostalgic and retro items under one roof.

Only a few weeks since opening its doors, Omnia Vintage Thrift & Collectables has already become a hub of activity in Longmont due to active social media efforts. Whether one is hunting for a vintage collectible, a unique piece of clothing, or a rare vinyl record, one is sure to find something special. After all, this isn't just a store, it’s an adventure through the decades.

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Colorado Immersive Events to elevate event industry starting with Leftoween Elks Lodge celebrates 117 years and joins Longmont Chamber University of Colorado Boulder’s chancellor to retire

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Dad abandons son with autism at Longmont hospital and human service workers refuse to take custody

A 13-year-old boy with Autism has been forced to live at UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont for three weeks after his dad abandoned him and human service workers told hospital employees it would take months to secure placement for the boy due to a lack of resources.A hospital employee emailed state Rep. Judy Amabile of Boulder last week asking her to intervene.The employee said Boulder County Human Service workers initially agreed to take custody of the boy and then refused saying he was safe in an emergency department....

A 13-year-old boy with Autism has been forced to live at UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital in Longmont for three weeks after his dad abandoned him and human service workers told hospital employees it would take months to secure placement for the boy due to a lack of resources.

A hospital employee emailed state Rep. Judy Amabile of Boulder last week asking her to intervene.

The employee said Boulder County Human Service workers initially agreed to take custody of the boy and then refused saying he was safe in an emergency department.

"Boulder County DHS has not spent more than five minutes with this child since his arrival three weeks ago," the hospital employee wrote.

Amabile says state and county human service workers told her they are working on finding placement for the boy but she says it is unconscionable that he has been forced to live in a hospital for nearly a month, "I don't know whether the dad may or may not have reached out and ask for help but may not been able to get any help. Like we just... we don't know, but what we do know is that you can't just leave a 13-year-old in an ER for weeks on end with no end in sight."

She says she also reached out to both Boulder County and State Human Service workers but they would only say that they were working on it.

Both UCHealth and the Colorado Department of Human Services said they couldn't talk about the case due to health privacy protections.

"Patients are always our top priority. However, hospitals are not equipped to provide long-term services for people who do not need acute medical care. We rely on our partnerships with city, state and county organizations to assist us in finding appropriate solutions when patients are ready to leave and need a safe place to go," Kelli Christensen with UCHealth told CBS News Colorado.

Madlynn Ruble with the Colorado Department of Human Services said while the state is working to increase residential treatment, it lacks options for children with highly complex medical and behavioral health needs, due in part to a lack of providers.

"Every month there are children and youth who are either living in residential settings out of state, sleeping in county offices or hotels overnight, or staying in hospital or detention settings past when it is appropriate for them to be there," she said.

Amabile has carried legislation allocating millions of dollars to increase the availability of residential treatment. She says the state is not moving fast enough to deploy the money.

"We're not responding like it's an emergency. We're responding like, well, it's a problem," she said.

Amabile says if the state can stand-up a makeshift hospital for COVID overnight, it should be able to open more facilities for behavioral healthcare in the two years since the legislature first approved additional funding.

"The house is on fire and we can talk about insulation but we've got to get these people out of the house and then we've got to put the fire out and then we got to find them another place to be and that's not what we're doing. Yes, we will pass more legislation. We will try to get more money into the system. But we have to rethink the whole thing. We are spending a huge amount of money in these various systems - mental health, child welfare - and if... we don't take a different look, if we don't try a different way, then I don't know that we're ever going to solve it."

Amabile says she hears from dozens of parents every year who are desperate for help for their kids. She says not only is the behavioral health care system not adequate, neither is the child welfare system.

While it is unclear why the boy's dad abandoned him, Amabile says, perhaps if the child welfare system had been involved sooner, he may not have done so.

An interim legislative committee is currently working on an overhaul of the child welfare system.

UPDATE: Grandfather of boy abandoned at Colorado hospital pleads for help as lawmakers consider overhaul of child welfare and behavioral health systems

Shaun Boyd

Shaun Boyd is the Political Specialist at CBS News Colorado. Read her latest reports or check out her bio and send her an email.

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Longmont keeps regional minimum wage on the table

City agrees to continue exploration of a regional minimum wage in collaboration with other Boulder County communities Listen to this article Longmont City Council heard from multiple stakeholders about the possibility of implementing a local minimum wage on Tuesday.T...

City agrees to continue exploration of a regional minimum wage in collaboration with other Boulder County communities

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Longmont City Council heard from multiple stakeholders about the possibility of implementing a local minimum wage on Tuesday.

The discussion was the first brought to council and no decisions were made, but a regional working group will continue exploring the option.

Longmont is a member of the Boulder County Consortium of Cities, of which some members are interested in collaborating to study, engage and potentially enact a regional minimum wage across participating jurisdictions in Boulder County. The work group includes representatives from Boulder County, Boulder, Louisville and Longmont.

Per a 2019 Colorado law, municipalities can set their own minimum wage for employees in their city within certain requirements. The current minimum wage in Colorado and therefore Longmont, which does not currently have a local minimum wage, is $13.65.

Boulder City Councilmember Lauren Folkerts, a representative for the Consortium of Cities, explained the working group’s efforts up to this point. The group is facilitating collaboration between cities and stakeholders to see what a minimum wage increase might look like, emphasizing collaboration as any community raising the minimum wage would impact other communities.

Denver is the only Colorado community that has implemented a regional minimum wage since the state passed the law, with the wage set at $17.29 an hour this year.

Folkerts noted Boulder City Council unanimously supported exploring this possibility. She said ideally the involved communities would come to a number they all agree on and then pass individually, but individual municipalities would be able to make their own decisions.

A target wage has not been identified at this time and there have been limited check-ins with stakeholders, but a full community engagement effort will be coming.

Council also heard from representatives of the Boulder Area Labor Council, an advocacy group for raising the minimum wage to a living wage. They cited a self-sufficiency proposal based on numbers from the Colorado Center for Law and Policy, which would include raising the minimum wage to $15.41 in 2024 and increasing by 12.9% each year until 2028 to achieve a target minimum wage of $25 an hour.

Scott Cook, chief executive officer of the Longmont Chamber of Commerce, added a business perspective to the conversation. He spoke about the strain local businesses are feeling in the current economic climate and asked that they be included in conversations about raising the minimum wage.

All council members agreed to consider exploring a possible minimum wage increase. Several emphasized the importance of engaging business stakeholders.

The timeline for any minimum wage increase coincides with the new year, as regional minimum wage increases can only be implemented on Jan. 1 of any year.

Abandoned teen lived in Longmont emergency room for weeks

A child abandoned by his father at a Longmont hospital lived there for at least three weeks and could be there for months more due to a lack of resources, according to an email thread obtained by the Longmont Leader.An email from Chantell Taylor, vice president of government and regulatory affairs at UCHealth, to Rep. Judy Amabile was shared with Longmont City Council members and other officials at the end of June. The Longmont Leader obtained the email through a Colorado Open Records Act request.According to Taylor in an email...

A child abandoned by his father at a Longmont hospital lived there for at least three weeks and could be there for months more due to a lack of resources, according to an email thread obtained by the Longmont Leader.

An email from Chantell Taylor, vice president of government and regulatory affairs at UCHealth, to Rep. Judy Amabile was shared with Longmont City Council members and other officials at the end of June. The Longmont Leader obtained the email through a Colorado Open Records Act request.

According to Taylor in an email sent June 27, a 13-year-old boy with autism was brought to UCHealth Longs Peak Hospital’s emergency department and abandoned by his father in early June. The boy had been brought in on an M1, when an individual is thought to be in danger of harming himself or someone else.

Taylor said the hospital tried to place the boy in an inpatient psychiatric facility.

“...However (he) was denied at all facilities in the state primarily due to his (Autism Spectrum Disorder) but also because he simultaneously was cleared by psychiatry and did not meet criteria,” Taylor wrote.

The boy was cleared medically and psychiatrically for discharge the day after he was brought to the hospital, but his father has refused to pick him up. Taylor said the hospital has placed three reports with Child Protective Services for neglect, abandonment and interference for discharge.

Since then, the hospital’s social work team initiated daily meetings with departments ranging from the Boulder County Department of Housing and Human Services, the Colorado Department of Human Services, Colorado Community Health Alliance, Colorado Department of Health Care Policy and Financing and the State Department of Child Welfare.

However, according to Taylor’s email, all agencies have said this is a “statewide resource issue,” and that it will likely take months to secure placement for the boy.

The child remains in the emergency department, is unsupervised apart from hospital staff and has had no adult with him. He has not had any “acute episodes” since his arrival in the emergency department, Taylor added.

“UCHealth has done everything in their power to discharge this patient in a safe manner and have received no assistance from the Department to protect this child and pick up from the

(emergency department),” Taylor wrote. “He has no acute medical needs and is in the ED without any supervision.”

Taylor added that frontline staff said Boulder County’s Department of Human Services had not spent more than five minutes with the child since his arrival three weeks prior.

“He needs protection due to neglect, abandonment and trauma inflicted by his father, this process with DHS, and the reality of extended stay in the emergency department environment,” Taylor wrote.

Amabile passed this email on to several figures involved in the issue, asking if anything could be done to get the child out of the emergency room.

In the email thread obtained by the Leader, Boulder County Family and Children Services Director Mollie Warren responded to Amabile’s concern on June 29. Warren first noted that confidentiality statutes prohibit the disclosure of individual information, meaning she could not confirm nor deny whether someone is a client of the county’s.

“As you likely all know, we are in the midst of a behavioral health/high acuity crisis both in Colorado and across the United States,” Warren wrote. “For many years, county human services departments have highlighted this crisis, the related impacts on the children and youth we are responsible for keeping safe, and the challenges this creates in terms of placements and longer-term supports …

“We are acutely aware of the impact extended stays in local hospitals, child welfare offices and detention centers have on the children and youth who most need behavioral health support. Our hearts are breaking for the children and families most impacted by this shortage of longer-term resources for young people in (a) behavioral health crisis.”

Warren went on to note that Boulder County Housing and Human Services staff are not trained, qualified or tasked with providing long-term care for members of the community suffering behavioral health emergencies.

“The Chief Judge of the 20th Judicial District, Ingrid Bakke, stated on the record that placements at our offices at the St. Vrain HUB are not safe for this purpose just this week,” Warren said.

Taylor declined to say whether the boy remained in the emergency room as of Thursday, citing the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

About the Author: Amy Golden

Amy Golden is a reporter for the Longmont Leader covering city and county issues, along with anything else that comes her way.

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Longmont’s Multifaceted Approach to Better Bicycling

June 21, 2023From eliminating parking minimums to mandating the inclusion of bike lanes in road improvement projects, biking is at the forefront of urban planning for this Colorado city.When it comes to great places for bicycling along Colorado’s Front Range, Boulder and Fort Collins are often touted for their long histories as bike-forward cities. However, thanks to recent population shifts bringing more people to surrounding suburbs, a new wave of Colorado cycling cities is emerging.“In recent years, there ...

June 21, 2023

From eliminating parking minimums to mandating the inclusion of bike lanes in road improvement projects, biking is at the forefront of urban planning for this Colorado city.

When it comes to great places for bicycling along Colorado’s Front Range, Boulder and Fort Collins are often touted for their long histories as bike-forward cities. However, thanks to recent population shifts bringing more people to surrounding suburbs, a new wave of Colorado cycling cities is emerging.

“In recent years, there have been lots of folks from Boulder and Fort Collins who found Longmont as a place to raise their kids,” says Phil Greenwald, transportation planning manager for the City of Longmont, which is situated a half hour northwest of Boulder.

With a population of roughly 100,000 people, 10,000 of which moved within the last decade, the two Front Range cities are now similarly sized. With the added population came a need to plan for growth, and in 2016, the city adopted “Envision Longmont” — a comprehensive multimodal plan outlining strategic guidance and direction for the city over the next 10 to 20 years.

“The multi-modal plan fully lays out our vision for bicycling,” says Greenwald. “There is a heavy focus on more dollars for active transportation and making long-planned projects a reality.”

Because growth inevitably means construction, one of Longmont’s major initiatives is prioritizing the improvement of roadways for all.

“With lots of street improvement projects, we’re giving people a chance to relook at how we use roads,” says Greenwald. “Whenever we have a resurfacing project, we think about how we can improve that street for bicycling. Even with existing bike lanes, we think about how we can improve.”

Recent examples include removing street parking along Longmont’s Mountain View Avenue to add a buffer for bike lanes to increase safety. Another project removed a lane of traffic along 9th Avenue, a major arterial through town, to improve safety for pedestrians, cyclists, and drivers.

New development is also a major target for increasing bikeability, with street design standards for the city mandating that new road construction needs to recognize the needs of all road users. If a new road is designated as a collector street (one that moves traffic from local streets to arterial roads) or larger, it needs to include a buffered bike lane. The land development code also requires a certain percentage of bike parking available compared to vehicle parking for all new commercial and apartment buildings.

Plus, the city’s dedication to improvement doesn’t just stop at road development. In 2014, Longmont eliminated parking minimum requirements, an effort that is known to help reduce urban sprawl and reduce reliance on personal vehicles. In 2019, the Longmont City Council also declared a climate emergency, doubling down on the city’s efforts to get people out of cars as a key component of combating climate change. Earlier this year, the council passed a resolution to make Longmont a Vision Zero community with the goal of eliminating fatalities on their roadways.

According to Ben Ortiz, leaning on the support of community members has also had a tremendous impact on the direction of the city’s work. “We have a bicycle issues committee made up of dedicated residents who give great input on how to improve biking,” says Ortiz, transportation planner for the city. “We also have a traffic mitigation program that has been around for 20 years. The program allows neighborhoods that feel that speed limits are too fast to initiate a process to facilitate slower streets.”

Looking ahead, both Ortiz and Greenwald have high hopes for the future of biking in Longmont. Greenwald is pushing Boulder County to create a separated bikeway along Highway 119, the diagonal artery between Boulder and Longmont. While he admits most people won’t bike the entire route, it’s more about making connections in the middle, so residents can access homes and businesses in the smaller communities of Niwot and Gunbarrel that often get overlooked. He also hopes to reincorporate a bike share program back into the city that is complementary to the existing B-Cycle program in nearby Boulder, allowing folks to all use the same app and easily access bike share no matter where they go.

For the first time this year, Longmont ranked #10 for medium-sized U.S. cities in PeopleForBikes’ 2023 City Ratings, an annual program that evaluates and identifies the best places for bicycling. While this accomplishment may seem out of reach, it’s worth noting that in 2022 Longmont was ranked #88 among medium-sized U.S. cities. By prioritizing bicycling and making consistent, intentional investments, any city can do what Longmont has.

“Look at your land development code and street design standards,” says Ortiz. “For new streets, incorporate bike facilities and sidewalks. Make sure you have bike parking as a function of new development, and if you can get rid of minimum parking requirements, do it.”

“Whenever you look at a new project, incorporate the needs of the bike community,” reiterates Greenwald. “Not every project has to be expensive, either. Find the low-hanging fruit and how you can make small improvements. When you open up places where people feel safe, people will ride.”

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