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Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. Costa Mesa, CA, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you with the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

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When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in Costa Mesa, CA, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

Our certified experts modify containers to fit any of your business needs or events.

Our shipping container modifications can help improve or expand your business. We can customize containers to any size you need, so you can rest easy knowing you have enough space for your inventory, documents, equipment or services.

Here's why you should choose us for your container modifications:

  • We offer the highest quality modifications on the market.
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  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
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When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in Costa Mesa, CA, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our shipping containers for rental, sale and modification in Costa Mesa, CA, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

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Latest News in Costa Mesa, CA

Costa Mesa commissioners approve affordable housing law, next stop City Council

Dec. 14, 2023 8:30 AM PTAfter months of planning and evaluation, an affordable housing ordinance requiring developers to set aside a percentage of proposed residential units for low-income tenants is heading to the Costa Mesa City Council for potential adoption.But exactly whether and how such regulations might help the city address its housing needs, or possibly stand as an impediment to those wishing to build projects in Costa Mesa, remains to be seen.A final ...

Dec. 14, 2023 8:30 AM PT

After months of planning and evaluation, an affordable housing ordinance requiring developers to set aside a percentage of proposed residential units for low-income tenants is heading to the Costa Mesa City Council for potential adoption.

But exactly whether and how such regulations might help the city address its housing needs, or possibly stand as an impediment to those wishing to build projects in Costa Mesa, remains to be seen.

A final draft of the document was approved Monday by city planning commissioners, who’ve spent several months debating the merits of inclusionary housing and its impacts in public meetings where pleas from affordability advocates often clash with the viewpoints of developers and local landholders.

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Commissioners themselves were conflicted about the number of units in a proposed project that would trigger the law, what percentage of units should be designated affordable and whether or not Costa Mesa’s housing crisis would be alleviated, or exacerbated, by its implementation.

However, they pushed forward a proposal comprising several basic tenets to be considered for certain defined commercial and industrial corridors in town identified as areas where the city might rezone parcels for high-density residential use.

As passed by commissioners, the law would apply to housing developments with 10 or more units, unless they were specified as condominiums targeted for ownership, which would be exempt.

Developments involving 60 or more units per acre would be required to set aside either 10% of the total units for low-income tenants — defined by the city as earning 80% or less of Orange County’s area median household income ($127,800) — or 5% for very-low income tenants earning 50% of the median income.

Under the current iteration of the ordinance, proposals for smaller units would have a smaller set-aside rate for low- and very-low income tenants, 6% and 4%, respectively.

Consultant Kathe Head, president of Los Angeles-based firm Keyser Marston Associates, said she and city staff have been adjusting the rates and limits in response to comments from both affordability advocates, who insist on more stringent laws, and developers, who say they simply won’t build in Costa Mesa if its laws are too strict.

“We really wanted the policy to be on the conservative side, because we don’t want to create a constraint on housing,” she said. “We want market-rate housing to be developed in your community, and we want affordable units.”

Speaking in public comments at Monday’s hearing, representatives from both sides of the issue voiced their hopes, opinions and concerns moving forward.

Adam Wood, vice president of the Orange County chapter of the Building Industry Assn. of Southern California, said an inclusionary housing ordinance offers no incentives to build, only hindrances.

“This isn’t going to make it easier to create housing,” he said. “It’s an extra tax — we can’t tax our way to affordability.”

Those on the other side of the spectrum argued for even higher rates.

“The set-aside requirements in the current proposal are simply too low, and they’re based on faulty assumptions, said Kathy Esfahani, a retired attorney and housing advocate who sits on the Costa Mesa Affordable Housing Coalition.

“Santa Ana has a robust inclusionary housing ordinance that requires 15% low [income] and 10% very low. That ordinance is not stopping the development in Santa Ana. It won’t stop development in Costa Mesa in much more valuable addresses.”

Planning commissioners were similarly split, with some wanting policies that match much faster growing cities like Santa Ana and those who questioned the benefit of having such an ordinance at all.

Vice Chair Russell Toler, for instance, said he’d favor even higher rates for projects with densities at or above 60 units per acre and would be open to examining other trade-offs the city might make with developers, such as mixed-use ground floors, wider sidewalks and street trees.

Commissioner Jon Zich said he wasn’t keen on implementing a law that would essentially let some residents get a break on rents at the expense of the remaining renters in a complex. He also expressed hesitance about bringing more high-density buildings into Costa Mesa and wished the City Council good luck in their future deliberations on the matter.

“If the council is expecting a pile of stuff to be sent to them, I think we’re on the right track. If they’re expecting a finished product that the majority of the public and the advocates from the various special interests are in line with, then we failed at our job,” Zich said.

“I don’t know what their expectation is, but if they’re watching tonight, they know what they’re in for.”

The Costa Mesa City Council will likely consider the ordinance in a first reading sometime in January. After that public hearing, and a subsequent second reading resulting in adoption, the law would take effect 30 days later.

OC Cities Fight Over Bid to Use 100-Acre State Mental Health Campus in Costa Mesa For Housing

San Clemente city leaders are pushing back on a plan proposed by Governor Gavin Newsom’s administration to redevelop a mental health campus spanning over 100 acres owned by the state in Costa Mesa into housing.The opposition comes as the state is rolling out mental health courts, dubbed CARE Courts, that will begin ruling next week in Orange County on court-mandated treatment plans for homeless people wrestling with mental health issues or drug abuse problems.Yet there’s still lingering questions on where homeless p...

San Clemente city leaders are pushing back on a plan proposed by Governor Gavin Newsom’s administration to redevelop a mental health campus spanning over 100 acres owned by the state in Costa Mesa into housing.

The opposition comes as the state is rolling out mental health courts, dubbed CARE Courts, that will begin ruling next week in Orange County on court-mandated treatment plans for homeless people wrestling with mental health issues or drug abuse problems.

Yet there’s still lingering questions on where homeless people in CARE court will be sent.

[Read: California’s CARE Court: A Step in the Right Direction or ‘Terrifying’ Step Backwards?]

The Fairview Developmental Center has sat in the city since 1959, serving residents with developmental disorders but was closed by state leaders after multiple deaths at the facility.

This week state officials are set to hold a community meeting to discuss the project on Thursday at the Fairview Center’s auditorium at 6 p.m. to answer questions on a newly proposed emergency center and the construction’s impacts on the area.

Most recently, San Clemente City Council members publicly called for the state to turn Fairview into a regional homeless center, sheltering the unhoused and offering services to help get them into more permanent living situations.

“Orange County, specifically South OC, doesn’t have a regional center,” said San Clemente Councilman Mark Enmeier, one of the four who voted in favor of pushing for Fairview’s redevelopment.

“We desperately need all the help we can get.”

OC Supervisor Katrina Foley, also former mayor of Costa Mesa and whose district includes much of South County, said it’s the individual cities’ responsibility to address the homeless issue with help from the county.

“Why is that fair to Costa Mesa? To shoulder the burden of residents who are not from the area?” Foley said in an interview. “It doesn’t solve the problem. It would give Costa Mesa more beds, but it wouldn’t help San Clemente.”

San Clemente City Council members have resisted a shelter in their city for years and most recently hired security guards to monitor homeless people on the beach.

[Read: San Clemente Leaders Move to Push Homeless Off Local Beaches]

The Fairview Developmental Center opened in 1959, originally sitting on over 750 acres that was later whittled down to a 109 acre property, which was largely left alone until state leaders closed the facility in 2016.

At that point, Costa Mesa and other cities in the county began to question what the land should turn into after the closure, with some calling for the county to take advantage of a large, empty parcel of land to create a homeless services center.

San Clemente repeated that call last month, when a majority of city council members sent a letter to the city asking for the site to be converted to housing for the homeless, along with supportive services.

“With this being a state facility, it would seem to make sense when the facility is closed and repurposed it should benefit all the communities in the county rather than a single community,” said San Clemente City Manager Andy Hall at the council’s Aug. 15 meeting.

But plans for a regional homeless facility never materialized, and Costa Mesa City Manager Lori Ann Farrell Harrison said the city fought hard to keep any kind of homeless service facility out of the city at Fairview.

“Our first engagement with the state was regarding that issue, and our desire for the site not to be used in that fashion,” Farrell-Harrison said during last Tuesday’s city council meeting.

She echoed an argument made by city officials throughout Orange County.

“We didn’t want Costa Mesa to take the brunt of the entire county,” Farrell-Harrison said.

Under the proposed plan, roughly 94 of the 109 acres will be converted into housing, while the leftover 15 acres will go to a new emergency operations center run by the California Office of Emergency Services, which would help coordinate disaster relief across Southern California.

City staff are aiming to find a developer for the site by 2025, and will help the city meet its state-mandated housing goals, with estimates that it will bring 2300 new housing units to the city, satisfying nearly 20% of the city’s housing requirements on its own according to the city’s approved housing plan.

Farrell-Harrison added that Foley – when she was mayor – was a big help to their efforts, traveling to Sacramento to push state leaders away from turning the site into a homeless shelter, and that Gov. Gavin Newsom put a “kibosh,” on any discussion of a homeless shelter at the site.

“That was a successful lobbying effort,” Farrell-Harrison said.

Newsom’s press office did not respond to a request for comment.

Foley said while Costa Mesa set up a shelter in partnership with Newport Beach for those two cities, other South OC cities have yet to find a solution.

[Read: Costa Mesa Allocates Millions in Grant Funds for Permanent Shelter Pending County Approval]

Foley pointed out that while there are homeless shelters in both North and Central Orange County, South OC cities have yet to agree on where more shelters should go, claiming that until they bring an option to the county there isn’t much that can happen.

“When we moved forward with the Costa Mesa shelter, we had some foundational sort of parameters that we all agreed on as a council,” Foley said. “I think what the cities in South County need to do is do the same thing – come together, create some guidelines for where a shelter in south county would be appropriate. Then…I can help them get the funding.”

County supervisor Don Wagner, who also represents parts of south OC, did not respond to requests for comment.

Kathy Esfahani, chair of the San Clemente Affordable Housing Coalition, agreed with Foley that it was on South County to figure out its own problems.

But she also said that San Clemente had been opposing a shelter in their own city for years.

“The city is looking to export its own homeless problem,” Esfahani said. “For the city council to vote 4-1 to say ‘Oh we’ll just ask the state to take care of all the unhoused people in south county up in Costa Mesa’ it’s a typical dodge.”

When asked what it would take to set up new shelters in south Orange County, Esfahani only saw one option: a lawsuit.

“I think they’ll have to get sued. That’s how shelters got opened in Costa Mesa, Anaheim and Fullerton. It was because Judge Carter forced them,” she said. “There’s a long held attitude in San Clemente that unhoused people are an inconvenience, an eye sore, and they just need to be swept away.”

When asked if that was a common thought in south Orange County, she said “Actions speak for themselves.”

San Clemente Councilman Enmeier said that while Foley’s idea for cities working out a site was good in theory, none of the cities are willing to take the leap out of a fear they’d be stuck funding the shelters.

“The fear is that if your city sets up a regional center, well that will be a magnet for everyone else,” Enmeier said. “We don’t know if we’re going to get continual support, or is some of that funding going to dry up? Who’s left with the bill?”

Enmeier asked for the county to take a bigger leadership role on the process and help cities take that next step, pointing out that cities with shelters actually saw a drop in their unhoused population.

“Cities that actually get something done and put something forward are the cities that actually tackle homelessness,” Enmeier said. “If each of our smaller communities were to take a smaller piece of the pie, then we could get it done, but everyone’s afraid of being the first one to do it out of a fear of being the magnet.”

Noah Biesiada is a Voice of OC reporter and corps member with Report for America, a GroundTruth initiative. Contact him at nbiesiada@voiceofoc.org or on Twitter @NBiesiada.

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Help the Cats of 20th St. in Costa Mesa, CA,

I wanted to give you all an update on the hoarding case in Costa Mesa. Back at the end of August, Megan and I began rescuing as many cats as we could from a dilapidated property on West 20th Street. The home was scheduled to be demolished by a developer and the neighbors were not going to take care of cats, so we knew we had to find permanent homes for them. Neither of us had any idea what we were getting into, but once we started, we knew we had to see this rescue through until the end. Thanks to so many incredible people who helped ...

I wanted to give you all an update on the hoarding case in Costa Mesa. Back at the end of August, Megan and I began rescuing as many cats as we could from a dilapidated property on West 20th Street. The home was scheduled to be demolished by a developer and the neighbors were not going to take care of cats, so we knew we had to find permanent homes for them. Neither of us had any idea what we were getting into, but once we started, we knew we had to see this rescue through until the end.

Thanks to so many incredible people who helped us along the way and @loveyourferalfelines, we were able to rescue 21 cats and place them in their forever homes. We are forever grateful to Victoria for letting us house the cats in her garage for several months until they were well enough to be adopted.

Thank you Stephanie for teaching us how to properly tap and transport cats - we were clueless! Thank you Mike at Feed Barn for loaning us so many traps.

Thank you Jane and Ken for housing cats before and after their medical appointments.

Thank you to East Chapman Veterinary Center, @newportharborvets and @allcreaturescarecottage for providing these cats with the care they so desperately needed.

Thank you to all of you who donated to and shared our GoFundMe and thank you to those of you who tagged @cityofcostamesa and @supervisorfoley calling out their lack of transparency and concern for the animals in our city.

The problems facing animals in our communities can seem overwhelming, but when people come together to help them, there’s nothing we can’t do!! ❤️‍

**UPDATE 10/1/23**

We successfully transported 12 cats to San Diego yesterday with the help of the incredible team at Love Your Feral Felines (LYFF).

We still have five cats remaining who are receiving medical care in order to get them healthy enough to also be relocated to their forever homes in the next few weeks.

None of this would have been possible without the support of all of you who contributed to the GoFundMe. We are forever grateful to you - it truly takes a village! ❤️‍

** A video of the last five weeks of this rescue journey will be posted in the next few days on Instagram at these accounts:

@murphy_pip_indy_lucy and @megasaurus_5

**UPDATE 9/27/23**

As we enter week five of this huge rescue effort, we want to update you on the status of the Costa Mesa cats.

Thanks to your generosity, we have rescued a total of twenty one cats, and have had them spayed/neutered, ear tipped and vaccinated!!

We have partnered with LYFF (Love Your Feral Felines) and are now in the process of finding permanent homes to relocate them to in San Diego County. We will be renting a U-Haul and transporting 12 cats to their forever homes this weekend!

We acquired six cats from Costa Mesa Animal Control a few days ago, and those cats DID NOT receive the medical care that the City had promised us. We now have to cover all of their spay/neuter, ear tipping and vaccinations.

We also have five cats who are showing symptoms of URI (upper respiratory infection) which can be highly contagious.

Due to these unexpected medical costs, we are going to need to raise more money than we originally thought.

We so appreciate all of your donations and support that you have given so far. If you can donate even another $10, it will help us to provide the medical care that the remaining cats need so that they can be healthy enough to transport to LYFF in a few weeks.

It takes a village and we couldn’t have done this life saving work without your support - THANK YOU!! ❤️‍

Here are some photos of some of the cats we’ve been able to save thanks to your donations. They are safe in their catio and are being fed and well taken care of thanks to you!

**UPDATE 9/15/23**

We believe we are in the final stages of the rescue portion of this hoarding case. We have trapped 15 cats now and provided them with the medical care that they need. Two cats are living the good life on a ranch in Santa Barbara. We are now focusing our efforts on permanent locations for the remaining 13 cats to live.

We so appreciate your donations and if you have any connections to barns, wineries, or sanctuaries please let us know, as we want these cats to be able to live the rest of their lives in peace - never knowing hunger, neglect, or abuse again.

Thank you so much everyone for your support!!! ❤️‍

**UPDATE 9/12/23**

Our rescue story has finally gained media attention and we are thrilled to announce that we have a temporary holding space for the nine cats we’ve rescued. Two of our rescues are now living the good life at a barn in Santa Barbara.

We believe there are still 5 to 6 more cats that we need to trap before the demolition begins on the property. We are not sure how much time we have left.

We so appreciate your donations and if you have any connections to barns, wineries, or sanctuaries please let us know, as we want these cats to be able to live the rest of their lives in peace - never knowing hunger, neglect, or abuse again.

Thank you so much everyone for your support!!! ❤️‍

**UPDATE 9/9/23**

We have almost reached our goal thanks to your generosity, and we are so grateful to each and everyone of you.

We saw nine cats at the property tonight, one of whom we believe to be pregnant. We are in desperate need of finding a place for these cats to live after they have been spayed/neutered and vaccinated.

They cannot be returned to their home, as the neighbors don’t want them there and neither does the developer of the new property that is being built on their home site.

If anyone has connections to any barns, wineries, or sanctuaries please let us know, as we want these cats to be able to live the rest of their lives in peace - never knowing hunger, neglect, or abuse again. ❤️‍

**UPDATE**

The City of Costa Mesa posted a false claim on their Instagram on 9/5/23 stating that “The feral cats have been removed from the property and are under the care of animal rescue teams.”

THIS IS A BLATANT LIE. We trapped two cats last night and saw six others who are alive on the property. There are most likely many more still in hiding underneath the home’s foundation.

The City continues to gaslight us and try to silence us, but we will not go away until every single living cat has been removed from this property.

****************************************

We are trying to raise funds to help the cats and kittens that remain on this property in Costa Mesa, California that is scheduled for demolition.

After repeated attempts to contact city agencies, we still do not have the answers that we are looking for. The City of Costa Mesa and its Code Enforcement and Animal Control agencies have failed these cats and kittens miserably.

This GoFundMe aims to raise money to provide temporary housing and medical care for the cats and kittens that remain at this property until they can be relocated.

Any donation is greatly appreciated. Thank you so much for your support!!! ❤️‍

Southern California marijuana retailer challenges city to greenlight opening

What’s the right revenue per square foot? What’s a realistic business outlook for cultivators? Get realistic market forecasts, state-by-state insights and benchmarks. Get the 2023 Factbook.(This story has been updated with a link to the court documents.)A marijuana retailer in Southern California has filed a challenge against the city of Costa Mesa in an effort to ...

What’s the right revenue per square foot? What’s a realistic business outlook for cultivators? Get realistic market forecasts, state-by-state insights and benchmarks. Get the 2023 Factbook.

(This story has been updated with a link to the court documents.)

A marijuana retailer in Southern California has filed a challenge against the city of Costa Mesa in an effort to gain final approvals to open the business.

High Seas claims in the state Superior Court filing that the Orange County city has failed to provide a legitimate reason for withholding its final permit to commence operations.

The company alleges in court documents obtained by MJBizDaily that it has been ready to open since Sept. 26 and the city has failed to provide any information in the past three weeks.

Meanwhile, the delays are costing High Seas well over $110,000 per month in fees, including employee salaries, according to email exchanges with MJBizDaily and a news release distributed Tuesday.

“Despite High Seas’ multiple attempts to open a line of communication to try and resolve this situation, the city of Costa Mesa has unfairly and capriciously withheld the issuance of this final permit without justifiable cause, inflicting substantial financial hardship on our business and preventing it from serving our community and contributing to our local economy,” co-founder Rachel Xin said in a statement.

“We demand a swift resolution that will allow us to open our doors immediately.”

Costa Mesa spokesperson Tony Dodero did not immediately respond to MJBizDaily requests for comment.

Costa Mesa is one of only a handful of cities in Orange County – the state’s third-largest with nearly 3.2 million residents – that allow adult-use sales.

However, the municipality has taken years to issue licenses, a countywide issue that has stalled the growth of the cannabis industry there.

In November 2020, Costa Mesa voters approved Measure Q, which mandated the city to develop a regulatory framework and rules for a retail program.

Yet, three years later, only a few marijuana retailers are operational in the city.

Costa Mesa’s New Mercado González Is a Wonderland of Mexican Food

IsIs there anything more timeless than a Mexican mercado?Walk through one and see large burlap sacks piled high with wrinkled, glossy chiles secos while the nutty scent of nixtamal mingles with tropical fruit. Convivial comedor owners bark to prospective diners, pitching their regional specialties. East LA’s El Mercadito, Lynwood’s Plaza Mexico, and the Alameda Swap Meet are three such mercados that have served Angelenos for decades. But the new Mercado González by Northgate González in Costa Mesa, which open...

IsIs there anything more timeless than a Mexican mercado?

Walk through one and see large burlap sacks piled high with wrinkled, glossy chiles secos while the nutty scent of nixtamal mingles with tropical fruit. Convivial comedor owners bark to prospective diners, pitching their regional specialties. East LA’s El Mercadito, Lynwood’s Plaza Mexico, and the Alameda Swap Meet are three such mercados that have served Angelenos for decades. But the new Mercado González by Northgate González in Costa Mesa, which opens on November 17, has captured the full mercado experience like none before, converging groceries with quality dining through engaging food stalls and even a full-service restaurant by two of LA’s most successful operators.

The new dining destination may be the boldest project yet from the Mexican supermarket chain founded by Don Miguel and Doña Teresa González, which spans 43 markets across four Southern California counties. Mercado González takes inspiration from Mercado de Coyoacán in Mexico City (CDMX), Centro de Abastos in Guadalajara, and the 129-year-old Mercado Benito Juárez in Oaxaca de Juárez, among others. Project manager Joshua González put together an eye-catching layout of stalls, produce kiosks, and other covered indoor market booths that are individually curated and etched with bright, sunny logos against pastel backdrops. Muralist Claudio Limón is responsible for the festive, joyful Mexican spirit that permeates the market inside and out.

The advantage of a mercado erected in the modern era — such as CDMX’s Mercado Roma — is accessibility. Mercado González has stripped away cold, detached aisles in favor of an open floor plan in which the pan dulces from panaderia, the hot tortillas from the tortilleria, the sweets from the dulceria, and large wooden crates teeming with dry bean varieties are all vying for shoppers’ attention. The aguas frescas stand boasts old-timey slogans like “Las Mejores Frutas de La Temporada” (the best seasonal fruit). Walk around and soon enough the urge to snack on antojitos will lead customers to the comedores. This is where Mercado González stands above all others, showcasing a collection of Mexican eateries from Jalisco, CDMX, Sinaloa, and even the famous Churreria El Moro.

Local stars Chiva Torta by the Albarran family serves spicy tortas ahogadas, while Japanese-Peruvian chef Luis Uechi does popular Mexican-style sushi at Sushi El Sinaloense. The Zenteno family has given their blessing to Rodolfo Zenteno and Jesse Fernandez, sons of the founders of Tacos Los Güichos, to open their own taquería based on the family’s signature al pastor. Don Miguel, a carnitas spot that pays homage to the Northgate González founder; Las Cazuelas guisados; and Mariscos El Pariente, are operated by Mercado González, with menus created from market ingredients. In all, more than 20 puestos offer regional food reflecting the breadth of Mexican culture in the greater Los Angeles area.

For a more full-service Mexican dining experience, Maizano and Entre Nos, the new restaurant and bar from Gruppo Apapacho, the restaurateurs behind LA Cha Cha Chá, Loreto, and Za Za Za, is accessible through a glass turnstile door alongside the comedores. The masa-centric menu features modern, yet affordable antojitos, and a Mexican haute cuisine approach to tlacoyos, mole negro, and cochinita pibil using fresh masa from Tortilleria La González. The restaurant and 6,000-square-foot bar draw from such Mexican states as Puebla, Oaxaca, and Yucatán for menu items, located inside Mercado González.

Since 1980, Northgate González has evolved from a grocery store serving LA’s Latino community to one servicing waves of immigrants from Mexico and other Latin American countries. Mercado González looks to the future as a fresh model that has the potential to enter non-Latino neighborhoods, offering the festive romanticism of the Mexican mercado as entertainment. It’s an escape from the common supermarket run. It’s also an exciting innovation for the regional Mexican-owned brand that could make Mercado González a national name.

Mercado González opens today at 2300 Harbor Boulevard, Costa Mesa, CA, 92626 with hours from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily. The operating hours of each of the vendors vary.

Mercado González

2300 Harbor Boulevard, Costa Mesa, CA 92626

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