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SHIPPING CONTAINERS IN Huntington Beach CA

Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. Huntington Beach, CA, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you with the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

Whether you need shipping containers for storage, office, moving, multi-purpose or custom use, we've got your back.

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STORAGE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Huntington Beach CA

When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in Huntington Beach, CA, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

Our certified experts modify conex containers to fit any of your business needs or events.

Our shipping container modifications can help improve or expand your business. We can customize containers to any size you need, so you can rest easy knowing you have enough space for your inventory, documents, equipment or services.

Here's why you should choose us for your container modifications:

  • We offer the highest quality modifications on the market.
  • Our certified fabricators have years of combined experience in container modifications. No other company in the industry matches our expertise.
  • We have modified thousands of containers over the past 25 years for foreign and domestic clients.
  • Our certified weld and quality control inspectors ensure everything is structurally sound and built to your specifications through every step of the process.
  • We can build multiple projects simultaneously in our 90,000 sq ft fabrication facility with consistent quality and a fast turnaround.
  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
  • Even after your custom container has been delivered, we still have your back. Our full-service staff can provide maintenance and quick modifications at your location.
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When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom conex solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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STORAGE & OFFICES

We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in Huntington Beach, CA, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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STORAGE CONTAINERS

Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our conex containers for rental, sale and modification in Huntington Beach, CA, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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MOBILE OFFICE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Huntington Beach CA

Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

CONTAINER SIZES AND TYPES

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

SMS-Single-Bay-Doors
10' Single Door Container
15' Single Door Container
20' Single Door Container
24' Single Door Container
30' Single Door Container
40' Single Door Container
45' Single Door Container
SMS-Dual-Bay-Doors
24' Double Door Container
30' Double Door Container
40' Double Door Container

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

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10' Open Bay Offices
20' Open Bay Offices
40' Open Bay Offices
40' Office with Split Rooms
SMS-Office-Single-window-storage
20' Office/Storage Combo
24' Office/Storage Combo
40' Office/Storage Combo

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All of our storage containers come standard with dual-lock vault-like security.

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SETTING THE STANDARD IN CONTAINER STORAGE SAFETY & SECURITY

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Up to six points for adding locks to your conex container, including a high-security slide bolt for puck locks.

Extra-long lockbox to ensure you always have at least one lock keeping your mobile storage container safe from break-ins.

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No holes to ensure your rental shipping container is wind and watertight.

Our 14-gauge corrugated steel containers are stronger than other storage solutions like pods.

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Shop and compare. When it comes to quality, delivery, security and service, you won't find a better value.

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High security, multi-point locking systems come standard on all our rental containers at no additional cost.

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90,000 sq ft indoor fabrication center and certified experts with more than 500 years combined experience in customized container modification.

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Latest News in Huntington Beach, CA

Local Beaches Are Glowing Blue Again

In these challenging times, the need for reliable local reporting has never been greater. Put a value on the impact of our year-round coverage. Help us continue to highlight LA stories, hold the powerful accountable, and amplify community voices. Your support keeps our reporting free for all to use. Stand with us today. Monthly Donation One-Time Donation IN THIS ARTICLEThe bioluminescent blue waves are back, with social media posts confirming they have been sighted in Huntington Beach, Newport Beach, Seal Beach...

In these challenging times, the need for reliable local reporting has never been greater. Put a value on the impact of our year-round coverage. Help us continue to highlight LA stories, hold the powerful accountable, and amplify community voices. Your support keeps our reporting free for all to use. Stand with us today.

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IN THIS ARTICLE

The bioluminescent blue waves are back, with social media posts confirming they have been sighted in Huntington Beach, Newport Beach, Seal Beach and Long Beach.

The iridescent blue is caused by a planktonic organism — dinoflagellates — that are invisible to the eye, said David Caron, a professor of biological sciences at the University of Southern California. When agitated, they flash light through a chemical reaction.

Caron said they do that protectively as the light “shocks or startles” predators, allowing the plankton to move away.

Phytoplankton, zooplankton and even deep sea fish, he said, have bioluminescent organs to “startle predators, maybe to attract prey.”

The Brief

Peter Nguyen, a resident of Costa Mesa, has been monitoring the bioluminescence on Facebook, where people share their blue wave sightings. On Tuesday night, in Huntington Beach just off of 17th Street and Pacific Coast Highway, he spotted a faint glow on the beach.

He said he ran down to the shoreline where he watched the bioluminescence in the distance where the waves were just disrupting it.

"And then also a couple times it came up close and as the waves were breaking, it was causing it to light up as well and it was just all over the shoreline,” he said.

Nguyen’s tips for catching the neon blue waves

Why are we seeing the blue waves more frequently

The last time the blue waves made an appearance was in September. Caron said these plankton blooms wax and wane with the seasons.

“They're documented in the literature as early as the early 1900s," he said. "There were lots of these blooms in the 1970s, then they kind of disappeared for a while. They came back after that prevalent in maybe the early 2000s, and then they weren't that prevalent again, and now they seem to be back again.”

Clarissa Anderson, a biological oceanographer at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, added that bioluminescence is not something out of the ordinary.

“We don't really see a climate connection, considering the fact that these plankton that caused the bioluminescence have been here for so long,” she said. “We have no reason to make a connection scientifically that global warming is going to cause more of these blooms. But in general, when you have warmer water, you can get more plankton and algae blooms.”

Monitoring

The dinoflagellates are decomposed by bacteria and for that to happen, the bacteria use oxygen from the water, Caron said.

“In doing that, they can actually drive the oxygen concentration in the water down to very low levels,” he added. “They can eliminate the oxygen in the water if they are dense enough and their bloom dies kind of en masse all at once. If that happens, of course, if there's no oxygen in the water, then it does cause detrimental effects for things like fish and other organisms.”

Because of this, the Harmful Algal Bloom Monitoring Program monitors the microscopic algae at several piers in Southern California every week. The information they collect goes into a website managed by the Southern California Coastal Ocean Observing System run out of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography.

Federal Judge Tosses Surf City Lawsuit Against CA Housing Mandate

A federal judge threw out Huntington Beach’s lawsuit Tuesday afternoon, which the city argued state leaders can’t force housing construction.Now, the issue heads back to state court – where California Attorney General Rob Bonta is mounting a legal battle against Surf City for refusing to follow state housing mandates.The issue in federal court was whether or not California leaders can force a charter city like Huntington Beach to follow the Regional Housing Needs Allocation, or RHNA, which mandates the number ...

A federal judge threw out Huntington Beach’s lawsuit Tuesday afternoon, which the city argued state leaders can’t force housing construction.

Now, the issue heads back to state court – where California Attorney General Rob Bonta is mounting a legal battle against Surf City for refusing to follow state housing mandates.

The issue in federal court was whether or not California leaders can force a charter city like Huntington Beach to follow the Regional Housing Needs Allocation, or RHNA, which mandates the number of housing units cities are expected to plan for each year.

State leaders and Huntington Beach City Council members sued each other this past March, with city leaders arguing it was unconstitutional for the state to force them to develop housing while the state said the city couldn’t willfully violate state law without consequences.

Read: California’s Battle With Huntington Beach Over Housing Goals Heads To Court

In the minutes documenting the judge’s ruling on the issue, U.S. District Judge Fred Slaughter wrote that the city didn’t have the right to challenge the state in federal court based on earlier rulings by the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals.

To read a copy of the minutes, click here.

“Although Plaintiffs (the city) maintain they each have standing to bring federal constitutional claims challenging the RHNA laws, the court finds each group of Plaintiffs lacks standing,” Slaughter wrote.

However, he said city officials were welcome to try their luck in a state court, which would have the ability to decide whether or not the state’s housing laws were constitutional.

Huntington Beach City Attorney Michael Gates said the judge was “surprisingly light on the court’s decision for dismissal” and argued the cases Slaughter cited shouldn’t apply to Surf City in a statement on Tuesday.

“We will appeal this decision to the Ninth Circuit,” Gates said. “The City’s lawsuit is compelling and should be given a full, proper analysis under the law.”

The precedents that Slaughter cited in throwing out Gates’ motion were approved by the Ninth Circuit.

The end of the federal lawsuit also reopens the door for a lawsuit in state court brought by Bonta, who sued the city of Huntington Beach for failing to follow state laws and plan for more housing.

In a statement on Tuesday, Bonta praised Slaughter’s decision.

“We filed a motion to dismiss Huntington Beach’s federal lawsuit because we believed it was meritless. We are pleased that the court agreed,” Bonta said. “With this behind us, we look forward to prosecuting our state case against Huntington Beach.”

Less than two weeks earlier, city leaders celebrated that the state’s case had been paused by a judge, who said they needed to wait until the federal court had made a decision on the issue.

“This is a great win for the City,” wrote Mayor Tony Strickland in a statement on Nov. 3.

“This is a fundamental fight that we will continue to fight, every day. I want to thank our City Attorney’s Office for their continued great legal work, and our City Attorney Michael Gates for a phenomenal job in court,” he said.

But with the end of the federal case, that lawsuit can now move ahead.

It also opens questions on what penalties the city could incur if they lose at the state level.

[Read: What Happens To Cities That Defy California’s Housing Mandates?]

State Senator Dave Min (D-Irvine), who represents the city and has been a public opponent of the city council majority, praised the judge’s decision in a statement Tuesday afternoon.

“For the record, a motion to dismiss is only granted if there is no triable issue of fact,” Min said.

“Once again, I want to encourage the newly elected HB Council majority to stop wasting your taxpayers’ dollars on political posturing and instead get to work on addressing the real problems that your residents are facing.”

City Councilman Dan Kalmick, who opposed the city’s decision to file the lawsuit against the state, said while he wasn’t happy to see the city lose, he said it reinforced the point that city leaders needed a new housing plan.

“I’m not surprised the case was dismissed,” Kalmick said. “This judge felt that the arguments that the city attorney made didn’t rise to his level and dismissed the case.”

Reporter Hosam Elattar contributed to the reporting of this story.

Noah Biesiada is a Voice of OC reporter and corps member with Report for America, a GroundTruth initiative. Contact him at nbiesiada@voiceofoc.org or on Twitter @NBiesiada.

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Huntington Beach clarifies its stance, says it will recognize Black History Month, other cultural events

Huntington Beach officials said Friday the city will recognize Black History Month, Women’s History Month and other cultural observances in 2024, despite the City Council seemingly voting to the contrary earlier in the week.The council passed an item 4-3 on Tuesday night to institute a 12-month calendar that will see each month dedic...

Huntington Beach officials said Friday the city will recognize Black History Month, Women’s History Month and other cultural observances in 2024, despite the City Council seemingly voting to the contrary earlier in the week.

The council passed an item 4-3 on Tuesday night to institute a 12-month calendar that will see each month dedicated to a specific theme. The language of the agenda item stated that any previous monthly themes or celebrations approved by earlier City Councils would be repealed and superseded.

Councilman Casey McKeon, the author of the item, indicated during the meeting that the city would not celebrate Black History Month in 2024, though it could be brought back to the calendar in future years. This came in response to a direct question from Councilman Dan Kalmick.

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But Huntington Beach public affairs manager Jennifer Carey called that a “miscommunication” on Friday. She released the calendar for the first quarter of 2024, which included the approved themes of “Founders’ Legacy — Celebrating Huntington Beach’s Origins” for January, “We Love Our Libraries — Huntington Beach’s commitment to books, reading and learning” for February and “California’s History — Before statehood to now, and what it means to be a Charter City” for March.

However, Black History Month and Women’s History Month are also listed for February and March, respectively.

“The existing acknowledgments, tributes, holidays, cultural heritage months that we have already been acknowledging will still be acknowledged,” Carey said. “It’s just that the content that will be continuously distributed throughout the month will be related to that overarching, celebratory theme. I think there was, and understandably so, confusion in regard to the item. [It was discussed] that we have this one celebration and that’s it, and that’s simply not the case.”

Carey said there will be a cohesive effort that her office would oversee in collaboration with a resident committee that will be established to decide themes for 2025 and future years.

McKeon said Friday that his agenda item was “misinterpreted in a way,” adding that it was a pilot program that will be continue to be fine-tuned.

“When I kept saying nothing precludes [Black History Month] from happening in the future, what I was referring to was the overarching theme of the month,” McKeon said. “It doesn’t mean that we can’t acknowledge Black history and those other themes within the month, but the overarching, celebratory theme of the month needs to be in the calendar. I’m trying to condense this down.

“I think there’s like 30-plus monthly themes that different departments have. So the genesis of this was to make it more meaningful and thoughtful, with all of the departments on the same page.”

But Kalmick wasn’t buying the claim that the dialogue from the dais was simply misunderstood.

“How could it have been a miscommunication?” Kalmick said Friday. “The video’s clear, the action agenda is clear. We explicitly asked, ‘Are we going to be celebrating this anymore?’ and they said, ‘No.’ So I don’t know how staff is managing that ... We asked [McKeon] four different ways, ‘Does this mean we’re not going to celebrate this?’

“You can’t just say, ‘No, we’re not going to do that’ without bringing it back to a vote of the council. If Casey thought it was something different, that’s not the staff direction and the understanding I had. They’re going to have to bring it back [to the City Council], or it’s illegal.”

Huntington Beach clarifies stance, says it will recognize Black History Month, other events

Huntington Beach officials said Friday that the city will recognize Black History Month, Women’s History Month and other cultural observances in 2024, despite the City Council seemingly voting to the contrary earlier.The council passed an item 4 to 3 last week to institute a 12-month calendar that will see each month dedicated to a sp...

Huntington Beach officials said Friday that the city will recognize Black History Month, Women’s History Month and other cultural observances in 2024, despite the City Council seemingly voting to the contrary earlier.

The council passed an item 4 to 3 last week to institute a 12-month calendar that will see each month dedicated to a specific theme. The language of the agenda item stated that any previous monthly themes or celebrations approved by earlier City Councils would be repealed and superseded.

Councilman Casey McKeon, the author of the item, indicated during the meeting that the city would not celebrate Black History Month in 2024, though it could be brought back to the calendar in future years. This came in response to a direct question from Councilman Dan Kalmick.

But Huntington Beach Public Affairs Manager Jennifer Carey called that a “miscommunication” on Friday. She released the calendar for the first quarter of 2024, which included the approved themes of “Founders’ Legacy — Celebrating Huntington Beach’s Origins” for January, “We Love Our Libraries — Huntington Beach’s commitment to books, reading and learning” for February and “California’s History — Before statehood to now, and what it means to be a Charter City” for March.

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California

June 21, 2023

However, Black History Month and Women’s History Month are also listed for February and March, respectively.

“The existing acknowledgments, tributes, holidays, cultural heritage months that we have already been acknowledging will still be acknowledged,” Carey said. “It’s just that the content that will be continuously distributed throughout the month will be related to that overarching, celebratory theme. I think there was, and understandably so, confusion in regard to the item. [It was discussed] that we have this one celebration and that’s it, and that’s simply not the case.”

Carey said there will be a cohesive effort that her office would oversee in collaboration with a resident committee that will be established to decide themes for 2025 and future years.

McKeon said Friday that his agenda item was “misinterpreted in a way,” adding that it was a pilot program that will continue to be fine-tuned.

“When I kept saying nothing precludes [Black History Month] from happening in the future, what I was referring to was the overarching theme of the month,” McKeon said. “It doesn’t mean that we can’t acknowledge Black history and those other themes within the month, but the overarching, celebratory theme of the month needs to be in the calendar. I’m trying to condense this down.

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“I think there’s like 30-plus monthly themes that different departments have. So the genesis of this was to make it more meaningful and thoughtful, with all of the departments on the same page.”

But Kalmick wasn’t buying the claim that the dialogue from the dais was simply misunderstood.

“How could it have been a miscommunication?” Kalmick said Friday. “The video’s clear, the action agenda is clear. We explicitly asked, ‘Are we going to be celebrating this anymore?’ and they said, ‘No.’ So I don’t know how staff is managing that.... We asked [McKeon] four different ways, ‘Does this mean we’re not going to celebrate this?’

“You can’t just say, ‘No, we’re not going to do that’ without bringing it back to a vote of the council. If Casey thought it was something different, that’s not the staff direction and the understanding I had. They’re going to have to bring it back [to the City Council], or it’s illegal.”

Szabo writes for Times Community News.

Letters to the Editor: Whatever Huntington Beach’s conservative City Council is doing, it isn’t restoring freedom

To the editor: Gracey Van Der Mark stated during her acceptance speech as mayor that she was bringing Huntington Beach back to the basics. She was bringing back choice. (“Huntington Beach is sticking it to ‘woke’ California. Some residents ask at what cost,” Dec. 13)Except, of course, the choice of what can flags can be displayed at an...

To the editor: Gracey Van Der Mark stated during her acceptance speech as mayor that she was bringing Huntington Beach back to the basics. She was bringing back choice. (“Huntington Beach is sticking it to ‘woke’ California. Some residents ask at what cost,” Dec. 13)

Except, of course, the choice of what can flags can be displayed at any city building or property. The conservative City Council majority voted that the LGBTQ+ rainbow flag and any other non-military or non-American flag should not fly. Residents will soon get to vote on whether the new flag ordinance can ever be changed.

Residents also did not get to vote on Van Der Mark’s proposal to take away the librarians’ ability to order books, and instead have a council-appointed committee approve what children’s and teen books will go into the library collection.

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Residents did not get to vote on whether any child or teen book with sexual references or content should be restricted so no one under 18 could even look at said books without parental consent.

If Van Der Mark and her fellow conservative council members really believe this is what residents want for their library, then why did they not allow them to vote on this proposal? Instead, the council majority voted and decided.

So much for giving residents the freedom of choice.

Barbara Richardson, Huntington Beach

..

To the editor: I was disappointed but not surprised to see the article about changes in Huntington Beach after the new conservative council majority took over.

I don’t have an issue with a restriction on what flags are raised at City Hall, just as I understood when the city of Solvang wanted to limit large banners or displays.

But certainly, a community group in a town should be able to have a sign of welcome and gathering somewhere in the city. If the Masons can welcome members, the LGBTQ+ community can too.

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It never fails to amaze me how “woke” has turned into an insult. I hadn’t realized welcoming old friends and new visitors and extending a sense of safety and community was a sinister “woke” plot. I just thought it was the Christian thing to do.

Patrick Erwin, Cathedral City

..

To the editor: Before moving to the Bay Area in 2014, I had lived in Huntington Beach for 18 years, and I always enjoyed the pleasant shoreline, good restaurants and nice neighborhoods.

What I didn’t appreciate was the intolerance and prejudice bubbling beneath the surface. Now, those have taken center stage with the appalling actions of the new City Council.

The next time I pass through Huntington Beach, I certainly won’t spend any money. It’s the best way I know to show my disgust.

Marvin Freedland, Foster City, Calif.

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