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Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. San Diego, CA, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

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When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in San Diego, CA, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

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  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
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When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in San Diego, CA, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our shipping containers for rental, sale and modification in San Diego, CA, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

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Latest News in San Diego, CA

San Diegans watch the solar eclipse at Fleet Science Center

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SAN DIEGO (KGTV) — San Diegans patiently stared into space at the Fleet Science Center, waiting for the solar eclipse to appear through cloudy skies.

“I’m still waiting for the ring of fire, said Wendy Birdsall. "I was one of the first people out here.”

It finally peaked out around 9a.m. on Saturday.

“At first I was kind of annoyed because it was very foggy this morning, but once it came out it was a clear view of the sun,” said Xaviar Ha.

Less than thirty minutes later, hundreds of people could see the climax of sun coverage. The bright spot sparked excitement from the crowd that came to watch.

“I’ve always had a fascination for astronomy, stars, moon sun, all of it," Birdsall said. "I don’t know. I think it's something hardwired into everybody as human beings.”

“It was an unexpected very fun experience, my very first time seeing something like this,” said Elijah Clark.

Although it was partially covered, the sun is a lot brighter than you'd think. That's why volunteers asked everyone to wear special shades to protect their eyes from permanent damage.

“You're forcing yourself to look at the sun for a little longer than you would normally let yourself,” said Dr. Lisa Will, an astronomer at the Fleet Science Center.

Dr. Will says Saturday’s eclipse showed the moon covering about 30% of the sun.

“If you want to see the sun totally eclipsed, you’ll have to take a vacation from San Diego because that’s not going to happen in your lifetime," Dr. Will said. "That’s how rare being in the path of totality can be for a certain location.”

Dr. Will says there will be another partial solar eclipse in San Diego in April, but it wont have as much coverage as this one.

Copyright 2023 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Tom Krasovic: After 25 years, it’s time to admit that a blown call didn’t cost Padres Game 1 of the 1998 World Series

After 25 years, let’s settle this once and for all.The likely errant call by umpire Rich Garcia on Mark Langston’s two-strike pitch to Tino Martinez isn’t why the Padres lost Game 1 of the World Series to the Yankees a quarter of century ago this month.One, Langston wasn’t obligated one pitch later to throw the fat one that Martinez ripped for a go-ahead grand slam at Yankee Stadium on the way to a 9-6 win.Two, the Yankees would’ve remained a slight favorite to win Game 1 even if Garcia made...

After 25 years, let’s settle this once and for all.

The likely errant call by umpire Rich Garcia on Mark Langston’s two-strike pitch to Tino Martinez isn’t why the Padres lost Game 1 of the World Series to the Yankees a quarter of century ago this month.

One, Langston wasn’t obligated one pitch later to throw the fat one that Martinez ripped for a go-ahead grand slam at Yankee Stadium on the way to a 9-6 win.

Two, the Yankees would’ve remained a slight favorite to win Game 1 even if Garcia made the likely right call instead of deeming the 2-2 pitch too low with two outs in the seventh inning and the score tied, 5-5.

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Here’s why: being the home team with a well-rested Mariano Rivera in reserve would’ve advantaged the Yankees, if only slightly.

Sure, Hall of Fame closer Trevor Hoffman gave the Padres a comforting presence. He had closed out the League Championship Series clincher three days earlier in Atlanta. He was prepared to go more than an inning on Oct. 17, 1998 — 25 years ago on Tuesday. Hoffman’s season that year yielded a 1.48 ERA and a baseball-best 53 saves.

Rivera, though, was far more accustomed to getting more than three outs. He had shown he could get up to 10 outs if needed. And he was a monster in the playoffs, pitching to a stunning 0.70 career ERA across 96 postseason outings. Rivera got more than three outs in 58 of those efforts and six to 10 outs in 33 of them.

The closer rivaled Hall of Fame shortstop Derek Jeter as the most important part of a Yankees dynasty that would win each World Series trophy between 1998-2000 to go with its title in ’96.

That’s why, even as Martinez stepped into the box with the score tied 5-5, Baseball-Reference.com’s probability model gave the Yankees a 62 percent chance of winning.

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It was a shame that Langston wasn’t rewarded for his seemingly perfect fastball with the count 2-2. As the lefty’s pitch went over the plate’s outer third, seemingly knee-high, Martinez was fooled from the Bronx to Yonkers.

“I was looking for the ball up in the zone,” Martinez would admit.

Padres

Oct. 14, 2023

Langston was unable to overcome Garcia’s call.

The full-count approach arguably called for risking the walk instead of the slam. One Padres veteran said the proper relief mindset was to “not give in” to Martinez. A starter for most his career and in 16 of his 22 outings that season, Langston threw a belt-high fastball over the plate’s inner third. Martinez pulled the 87-mph pitch into the upper deck.

So why did the Padres lose? Go back to events earlier in the seventh inning — if you can bear to relive them all these years later.

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Chuck Knoblauch’s three-run home run off Donne Wall, three pitches after manager Bruce Bochy summoned the reliever, dealt the Padres the most harm of any blow. The lofted drive into the left-field seats erased the 5-2 lead with the Padres — who had an 81 percent chance of winning before the home run, per Baseball-Reference — still needing two more outs in the seventh.

Bochy said he chose the reliable reliever over converted starting pitcher Joey Hamilton to replace a worn-out Kevin Brown after the Yankees put runners on first base and second base.

The case for Wall: he delivered a sharp 1998 season as a full-time reliever. His season numbers showed a 2.48 ERA, a very low home run rate (0.8 per nine innings) and a 1.166 WHIP.

The case for Hamilton: he was more apt to get a double-play grounder, threw a much hotter fastball and had thrown 4 2/3 scoreless innings across three relief outings that postseason, in addition to pitching into the seventh of his Game 4 start in the NLCS.

From the outset, Wall was off his game against fellow righty Knoblauch, who’d been having a poor postseason. Wall was outside the strike zone by several inches with both his breaking ball (low and away) and fastball (up and in).

Able to delete Wall’s nasty changeup, plus the curveball, Knoblauch could look for a 2-0 fastball.

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When Wall’s 89-mph fastball came in fat, Knoblauch met it flush.

Bochy had been served well by trusting his gut instincts in his four years directing the Padres. In years to come, Bochy heeded his radar en route to two National League West titles with three Padres, three World Series titles with the Giants and the current American League Championship Series with the Rangers.

But in a text Friday, Bochy acknowledged he went against his instincts when he picked Wall over Hamilton.

“My gut was leaning Hamilton,” he said, “but Wall was the guy we had used in that situation the majority of the time. So, I did second-guess myself.”

He added: “Joey was a power sinker-slider guy, which matched up better on Knoblauch.”

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Padres

Oct. 14, 2023

Hamilton said he was warmed up and ready to pitch when Bochy walked toward Brown.

“I thought with all my soul that I was going to be the one that was coming into the game in that situation,” Hamilton said Friday by phone. “I would’ve pounded Knoblauch in with a hard sinking fastball, gotten the groundball to the left side and been out of the inning. That’s how I saw it.”

Hamilton praised Wall’s excellent 1998 season, but said relief work suited him, too.

“It was always fun coming out of the bullpen because you didn’t have to worry about going seven innings,” he said. “You could just air it out.”

When a pitcher gears himself up to pitch in the first World Series game of his career — in Yankee Stadium no less — he’s bound to be beside himself when someone else gets the ball. No matter how much he respects that teammate.

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“I was not happy when I didn’t go into the game,” Hamilton said. “But then, after the inning, it went from not happy to borderline irate. But, it’s Boch’s decision. I remember I went into the clubhouse after the game and was tearing my locker up a little bit. (Pitching coach) Dave Stewart said, ‘Hey, you know this was my decision. Donne had been doing this job for us all year.’ I was like, ‘OK, whatever.’”

Years later, Hamilton learned directly from his former manager that Bochy had made the decision.

Before the seven-run avalanche, the Padres had appeared capable of swiping Game 1 from the winningest of all Yankees teams.

Slugger Greg Vaughn homered twice off David Wells. As part of his three-hit night that began with a gorgeous hit-and-run single, off a shin-high curveball wide of the far corner, Tony Gwynn hit a two-run homer off an upper-deck beer sign to break a 2-2 tie in the fifth.

In San Diego, fans screamed as Gwynn circled the bases. One particularly excited Padres fan was at Yankee Stadium. Tony Gwynn Jr., the Hall of Famer’s son, stood up in the Padres’ family section and screamed as his dad’s drive soared. Then the younger Gwynn, who had turned 16 earlier that month, let nearby Yankees fans have it. He razzed actors Denzel Washington and Bruce Willis, who’d been teasing him. At that point, Alicia Gwynn told her son to sit down.

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Despite illness, Brown — the Padres’ Game 1 starter — got off to a fast start. But when he misfired a 91-mph splitter to Chili Davis with one out in the second inning, the ensuing line drive that stuck Brown’s left shin could be heard in the pressbox.

Despite the ace laboring for the rest of that inning and losing velocity as the game unfolded, the Padres led 5-2 when Brown handed Bochy the ball five innings later.

“Biggest memory,” Bochy said in his recent text, “is having to get Brown with the flu-like symptoms he was dealing with.

“Obviously,” Bochy added, “the missed call (Langston to Martinez) was a game-changer, too.”

The final score was 9-6, and as the Yankees crowd sang along with Frank Sinatra’s “New York, New York,” it felt like the series was over.

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All that remained, as it turned out, was for the 114-victory Yankees to roll to a rout in Game 2, overcome pitcher Sterling Hitchcock’s strong outing in Game 3 — the first World Series game in Mission Valley since 1984 — and then survive Brown in in Game 4, whereupon Rivera logged his third save of the series to complete the sweep.

San Diego hasn’t sniffed a World Series since.

Homegrown Scoop Shop Brings Ice Cream Tacos and Farm-Fresh Flavors to Oceanside

A San Diego-based ice cream company that took off during the pandemic is unveiling its first dedicated storefront this Sunday, October 15 in South Oceanside. Little Fox Cups & Cones is opening a scoop shop at the Freeman Collective, joining a mix of food tenants that includes HomeState and Corner Pizza.Founder Meghan Koll has been in the hospitality industry for over 15 years, working as a bartender at several notable establishments including Carl...

A San Diego-based ice cream company that took off during the pandemic is unveiling its first dedicated storefront this Sunday, October 15 in South Oceanside. Little Fox Cups & Cones is opening a scoop shop at the Freeman Collective, joining a mix of food tenants that includes HomeState and Corner Pizza.

Founder Meghan Koll has been in the hospitality industry for over 15 years, working as a bartender at several notable establishments including Carlsbad’s Jeune et Jolie. In 2019, after participating in a national cocktail competition, Koll turned some leftover cold brew cream from her drink recipe into a batch of ice cream, and Little Fox Cups & Cones was born.

At the beginning of the pandemic, Koll started selling her ice cream through Viewpoint Brewing Co., her brother-in-law’s brewpub as it pivoted to drive-thru service. Before long, Little Fox went out on the road, bringing its mobile ice cream tricycle to more than 150 events and weddings, eventually launching a pop-up window at Leucadia boutique thread spun.

The creamery, which makes its super-premium, 16 percent butterfat ice cream entirely from scratch, will offer close to 20 rotating flavors available in scoops, ice cream flights, and pints-to-go. Applying her creative approach with cocktails to ice cream, Koll’s creations include Fig’get About It, made with vin santo fig compote, vanilla cream, and cheesecake pieces, and Roasty Toasty, featuring toasted brioche cream, mascarpone swirl. and crispy parmesan, as well as flavors inspired by local farm produce like Club Med, a citrus and olive oil ice cream infused with sea salt and Cyclops Farms tomato marmalade. Little Fox has also become known for its adorable ice cream tacos — complex, gourmet versions of the dearly-departed Choco Taco, which was one of Koll’s favorite childhood treats.

Koll, who tells Eater that the South Oceanside kitchen is large enough to potentially support several more scoop shops in the San Diego area, says that Little Fox will also be selling ice cream cakes for birthdays and special occasions.

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Little Fox Cups & Cones

1940 S. Freeman Street, Oceanside, CA 92054

I Tried It: The Haunted Amusement Park

Local union president says new Kaiser deal is a win-win

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SAN DIEGO (KGTV) — Days after healthcare workers protested around the clock at Kaiser locations in San Diego County a deal was finally struck by kaiser and the coalition of kaiser permanente unions early Friday morning.

Michael Ramey is an ultrasound technician.

He has been with Kaiser for 27 years and was one of the healthcare workers leading the strikes as the president of one of the local unions.

"I was able to understand that I was stepping away from the job because of my patients because of the care they just weren't receiving ," said Ramey.

He said one of the biggest issues was the staffing situation at many Kaiser locations. However, Kaiser claimed that was a false narrative at the time.

"We're going to be addressing that based on the terms of this agreement. So that as a health care worker brings me a lot of satisfaction because I know myself and my colleagues and my coworkers will be able to provide the quality of care and level of care that our patients deserve," said Ramey.

Ramey was actually at the bargaining table and cast one of the votes early this morning that led to the tentative agreement.

"There was a sigh of relief because I knew that it was the right thing to do and I knew it was for the right reasons," said Ramey.

During a joint audio-only press briefing hours after the deal was struck, it was revealed the secretary of labor was also part of the negotiations.

Some of the details include.

Copyright 2023 Scripps Media, Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

Hawaii vs. San Diego State updates: Live NCAA Football game scores, results for Saturday

Live scores, highlights and updates from the Hawaii vs. San Diego State football game Hawaii will be in front of their home fans on Saturday, but a look at the spread shows they might need that home-field advantage. They will take on the San Diego State Aztecs at 11:00 p.m. ET on Saturday. Given that both teams suffered a loss in their last game, they both have a little extra motivation heading into this game.Hawaii traveled a rocky road last season, and unfortunately for them the road hasn't gotten any smoother. They was th...

Live scores, highlights and updates from the Hawaii vs. San Diego State football game

Hawaii will be in front of their home fans on Saturday, but a look at the spread shows they might need that home-field advantage. They will take on the San Diego State Aztecs at 11:00 p.m. ET on Saturday. Given that both teams suffered a loss in their last game, they both have a little extra motivation heading into this game.

Hawaii traveled a rocky road last season, and unfortunately for them the road hasn't gotten any smoother. They was the victim of a painful 44-20 defeat at the hands of UNLV two Saturdays ago.

Steven McBride put forth a good effort for the losing side as he picked up 180 receiving yards and a touchdown. That's the first time this season that McBride posted 100 or more yards. Brayden Schager had a good game as well, finishing with 313 passing yards and two touchdowns in total.

The Rainbow Warriors weren't very productive on the ground and finished the game with only 46 rushing yards. Hawaii is winless (0-4) when they've ran for that many yards or fewer.

Meanwhile, there was early excitement for San Diego State after they claimed the first score two Saturdays ago, but it was Air Force who ended up claiming the real prize. San Diego State was dealt a punishing 49-10 loss at the hands of Air Force. San Diego State just can't catch a break and have now endured four defeats in a row.

Hawaii's defeat two Saturdays ago was their ninth straight on the road (dating back to last season), which dropped their overall record down to 2-4. That rough patch could be blamed on the team's lackluster offensive performance: across that stretch, they only averaged 16 points per game. The loss dropped San Diego State's season record down to 2-4.

Not only did San Diego State and Hawaii lose their last games, but neither team managed to cover the spread. Looking ahead, San Diego State is the favorite in this one, as the experts expect to see them win by six points. For those looking to play the spread, keep San Diego State's opponent in mind: they have a subpar 1-4 record against the spread vs Hawaii over their last five matchups.

Hawaii couldn't quite finish off San Diego State in their previous meeting back in October of 2022 and fell 16-14. Will Hawaii have more luck at home instead of on the road? Come back here after the game to find expert analysis of the match and other college football content.

UC San Diego Receives $9.5 Million to Bolster Cybersecurity in Healthcare

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have been awarded $9.5 million from the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H) as part of the DIGIHEALS initiative, which supports innovative research that aims to protect the United States health care system against hostile cyber threats. The ...

Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine have been awarded $9.5 million from the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H) as part of the DIGIHEALS initiative, which supports innovative research that aims to protect the United States health care system against hostile cyber threats. The new award, the first ARPA-H contract award for any University of California campus, will help the researchers develop better ways to prevent and mitigate ransomware attacks, a type of cyberattack in which hackers attempt to extort money from organizations by blocking access to essential computer systems.

“Health care systems are highly vulnerable to ransomware attacks, which can cause catastrophic impacts to patient care and pose an existential threat to smaller health systems,” said co-principal investigator Christian Dameff, MD, emergency medicine physician at UC San Diego Health and assistant professor at UC San Diego School of Medicine and UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. “Developing protocols to protect health systems, especially rural and critical access hospitals, will help save lives and make health care better for all of us.”

In 2019, Dameff became medical director of cybersecurity for UC San Diego Health, a first-of-its-kind appointment in the United States. Now, he joins co-principal investigator Jeff Tully MD, assistant clinical professor at UC San Diego School of Medicine, as heads of a newly-established Center for Healthcare Cybersecurity at the university.

“UC San Diego is a world leader in health care cybersecurity, and this new center will keep us on the cutting edge of this critically understudied field for years to come,” said Christopher Longhurst, MD, chief medical officer and chief digital officer at UC San Diego Health. The new center is enabled and supported by the Joan & Irwin Jacobs Center for Health Innovation, for which Longhurst also serves as executive director.

Ransomware attacks affecting health care delivery have been increasing in frequency and sophistication in recent years. Because so many parts of modern health care delivery are computerized, these attacks pose a significant and direct threat to patients’ lives, not just their privacy.

“When I talk about cybersecurity most people only think about protecting patient data,” said Dameff. “That’s all well and good, but we need to be just as concerned about care quality and patient outcomes. The impacts of malware and ransomware don’t stop at the digital border of a hospital.”

In addition to the risk they pose to patients, ransomware attacks are also extremely costly. The average cost incurred by health care systems recovering from a cyberattack was $11 million dollars according to IBM’s 2023 Cost of a Data Breach report.

“Some smaller systems can’t absorb the costs of a major ransomware attack, so when there is one, we ultimately lose those critical hospitals permanently,” said co-principal investigator Jeffrey Tully, MD, an assistant clinical professor at UC San Diego School of Medicine. “This is a worst-case scenario for patients who live in remote areas where there may not be another hospital for miles.”

The researchers will focus on identifying early indicators of cyber threats through simulated ransomware attacks, and will also create and test an emergency healthcare technology platform to be used in the event of an attack to ensure continuity of health care services.

“During a ransomware attack, hospitals often have to switch back to inefficient pen-and-paper methods of administration, and this slows down health care delivery and introduces additional risks to patient safety,” said Dameff.

In addition to Dameff and Tully, the project will also leverage the expertise of cybersecurity expert and MacArthur fellow Stefan Savage, PhD, who holds the Irwin and Joan Jacobs Chair in Information and Computer Science at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and is a professor in the UC San Diego Department of Computer Science and Engineering. Ramesh Rao, PhD, director of the UC San Diego Qualcomm Institute and professor in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the Jacobs School of Engineering, will also contribute to the team.

Though studying and preventing ransomware attacks are the researchers’ most pressing priorities, the project is expected to be the first of many groundbreaking initiatives that will emerge from the new Center for Healthcare Cybersecurity.

“Cybersecurity in health care is a huge problem that can affect each and every one of us, but few health care systems are prepared for the consequences of cyberattacks,” said Longhurst. “The new center is designed to address this unmet need, and this new research is just the beginning of that effort.”

UC San Diego Bioengineering Undergraduate Receives Public Service Scholarship Award

Daniel John, a bioengineering undergraduate student at the University of California San Diego, was one of 11 students from across the state awarded the $15,000 Strauss Scholarship for outstanding students developing social change or public service projects. Through the scholarship, John aims to develop and implement an electronic medical record system in remote, underserved parts of Fiji, with a goal of expanding the system to other developing nations in need of better digital health infrastructure.To develop this system, John will bu...

Daniel John, a bioengineering undergraduate student at the University of California San Diego, was one of 11 students from across the state awarded the $15,000 Strauss Scholarship for outstanding students developing social change or public service projects. Through the scholarship, John aims to develop and implement an electronic medical record system in remote, underserved parts of Fiji, with a goal of expanding the system to other developing nations in need of better digital health infrastructure.

To develop this system, John will build off experience he gained through several unique opportunities at UC San Diego, including conducting research as an undergraduate, and participating in both the Global Ties and the Global Changemaker Scholars programs in the Jacobs School of Engineering’s Center for Global Sustainable Development.

“We have this problem where the vast majority of clinical studies and public health studies are based on patients in the first world because we have their medical records,” said John. “But we don’t really know whether that all applies to the developing world, because we simply don’t have those records. As such, this is a significant health inequity issue. This is still a problem where my family comes from in India, so it’s really important to me to help solve that challenge.”

These electronic medical records (EMR) detail a patient’s health history, from surgical procedures to allergies to medications they’ve been on and what vaccines they’ve received, and are crucial in providing appropriate tailored medical care. Implementing EMR systems has been shown to not only improve the quality of care provided to patients, but also saves medical systems money by reducing unnecessary procedures and increasing efficiency.

Partnering with the Loloma Foundation, which provides free medical and dental services to patients in Fiji and the Solomon Islands, John will develop an EMR system that can work both in a hospital setting where there is computer access, as well as on a portable tablet in a remote setting without internet. John is also working with a translator to ensure the system is actually usable for the Fijian population.

“Right now, when they see a patient it’s all written down on paper and it is stored in a room that has stacks and stacks of paper records,” said John. “So anytime a patient comes back, they have to retrieve it, which is not only a huge headache, but also results in lost or missing records. And when a patient goes to a different island, or a different clinic, their records are not in the health system already so a doctor can’t see what their previous procedures might have been.”

John’s mentor for the project is Dr. Lance Hendricks, president of the Loloma Foundation and an anesthesiologist at Scripps Green Hospital in San Diego.

“Daniel is very dedicated to this undertaking and is a joy to work with,” Hendricks said. “There are challenges for both of us to work through this, but exciting at the same time.”

John got a first-hand look at the importance of electronic medical records as an undergraduate researcher in Professor Weg Ongkeko’s lab in the UC San Diego School of Medicine. During the COVID-19 pandemic, he used bioinformatics skills to analyze more than 100,000 anonymized records from COVID-positive patients across the entire University of California healthcare system. The goal was to determine what factors increased or decreased a person’s risk of contracting the virus and suffering more severe symptoms, which would be used to better understand this novel disease.

John was co-first author on the resulting paper, which found that patients with kidney disease, lung transplantation history, coronary atherosclerosis, and vitamin D deficiency had higher risk of infection with COVID-19. This information was crucial in giving lab scientists a clue into how the virus functioned, and tailor their lab research accordingly.

“That whole experience taught me how to work with EMR systems,” he said. “My bioengineering degree allowed me to understand a broad range of how we pursue research in the biology field, and what that looks like when we don’t really understand a disease-you have to first tackle it from a clinical perspective. I’ve gotten to do both sides of bioengineering at UC San Diego– wet lab research and bioinformatics– and I’ve been really thankful that the Jacobs School of Engineering has allowed me to do that.”

Contributing to this bioinformatics project solidified John’s understanding of the importance of EMR systems and the role they play in public health.

“You can’t do these clinical research studies that I was doing on COVID-19 patients if there is no electronic medical record. And that’s a very, very important part of public health: the ability to retrospectively look at patients to try and understand disease is crucial.”

John also brings his experience in the Global Ties program, designing technical systems alongside partner organizations, to bear on this Strauss Scholarship project. As a student participant and then teaching assistant, John was involved in the award-winning Cruz Roja project for three years, creating a mobile dispatch application for Red Cross emergency responders in Tijuana, Mexico, that makes it easier and faster for emergency medical crews to provide lifesaving help when and where it’s needed.

The Global Ties program is a course-based social innovation and sustainable community development program offered by the Jacobs School of Engineering that partners interdisciplinary teams of UC San Diego students with nonprofits and non-governmental organizations to co-create solutions to socially urgent problems.

The program is housed in the Center for Global Sustainable Development. The Center promotes and supports environmentally sustainable and socially just innovation. It encourages changemakers to pursue innovation for the global good, primarily benefiting those at the bottom of the wealth pyramid. It specializes in equity-focused, community-centered design to address some of the world’s most pressing challenges, particularly the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

“In one of my Global Ties classes, they talked about how something like 90% of all engineering solutions are tailored towards the consumer economy, and so there’s tons of design choices made solely to encourage people to want to buy more of the product,” said John. “That’s a huge challenge, that such a small percentage of solutions are focused on non-commercial applications. I think that we as engineers need to pour more effort and resources into that.”

John was able to connect with the Loloma Foundation and Dr. Hendricks through Mandy Bratton, Executive Director of the Center for Global Sustainable Development.

“Through my own work with Global Ties and the Loloma Foundation, I have first-hand knowledge of the conditions on the ground in Fiji and the magnitude of welcome change that Daniel’s project will create,” said Bratton. “He is one of UC San Diego’s best examples of a student changemaker. He is bright, laser-focused, and audacious, and he truly cares. He is going to go far, and the best part about it is that he is going to bring others with him.”

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