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Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. National City, CA, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you with the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

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When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in National City, CA, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

Our certified experts modify conex containers to fit any of your business needs or events.

Our shipping container modifications can help improve or expand your business. We can customize containers to any size you need, so you can rest easy knowing you have enough space for your inventory, documents, equipment or services.

Here's why you should choose us for your container modifications:

  • We offer the highest quality modifications on the market.
  • Our certified fabricators have years of combined experience in container modifications. No other company in the industry matches our expertise.
  • We have modified thousands of containers over the past 25 years for foreign and domestic clients.
  • Our certified weld and quality control inspectors ensure everything is structurally sound and built to your specifications through every step of the process.
  • We can build multiple projects simultaneously in our 90,000 sq ft fabrication facility with consistent quality and a fast turnaround.
  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
  • Even after your custom container has been delivered, we still have your back. Our full-service staff can provide maintenance and quick modifications at your location.
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When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom conex solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in National City, CA, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our conex containers for rental, sale and modification in National City, CA, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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MOBILE OFFICE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN National City CA

Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

CONTAINER SIZES AND TYPES

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

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10' Single Door Container
15' Single Door Container
20' Single Door Container
24' Single Door Container
30' Single Door Container
40' Single Door Container
45' Single Door Container
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24' Double Door Container
30' Double Door Container
40' Double Door Container

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

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10' Open Bay Offices
20' Open Bay Offices
40' Open Bay Offices
40' Office with Split Rooms
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20' Office/Storage Combo
24' Office/Storage Combo
40' Office/Storage Combo

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Up to six points for adding locks to your conex container, including a high-security slide bolt for puck locks.

Extra-long lockbox to ensure you always have at least one lock keeping your mobile storage container safe from break-ins.

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Our 14-gauge corrugated steel containers are stronger than other storage solutions like pods.

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Latest News in National City, CA

National City Taco stand closes down for business

Tacos El Villasana has built up their clientele for the past year but is forced to shut down for business.NATIONAL CITY, Calif. — Tacos El Villasana in National City has been operating outside of Machete Beer House for the past year selling tacos but Monday was their last day doing business there.“We got a notice a few weeks ago from the city of National City on our behalf of Machete Beer House that our food vendors weren't they were out of permit use,” Machete Beer House, Manager Adam Cornejo said.In t...

Tacos El Villasana has built up their clientele for the past year but is forced to shut down for business.

NATIONAL CITY, Calif. — Tacos El Villasana in National City has been operating outside of Machete Beer House for the past year selling tacos but Monday was their last day doing business there.

“We got a notice a few weeks ago from the city of National City on our behalf of Machete Beer House that our food vendors weren't they were out of permit use,” Machete Beer House, Manager Adam Cornejo said.

In the past year, the taco stand has built up their clientele with many people waiting in long lines to get their tacos. Tacos El Villasana Owner, Christian Villasana says after learning he had to close down his business, he wanted to know the reason why.

“When I had talked to the Mayor, he pretty much said someone had complained and then about the smell and stuff like that,” Villasana said.

CBS 8 spoke with National City City Councilmember Jose Rodriguez about this situation. Rodriguez said there are certain regulations street vendors need to follow.

“Under the current law, we have to use a commissary kitchen, a specific kitchen to cook everything and then bring the food either already cooked or cook it in a place and bring it right outside,” Rodriguez said.

Regulations vary in each city but in National City, these rules need to be followed by street vendors to continue operating.

“Tacos Villasana in the case of them, their business is geared towards cooking outside,” Rodriguez said.

Cornejo says Tacos El Villasana has his permits in order.

“He has his own LLC, he has his health department permits and he has his sellers permit so there's nothing illegal here, he has all his paperwork on paper,” Cornejo said.

Villasana had plans to save money to open a restaurant but for now he's focused on getting a food truck to continue his business.

“We just want to work to provide for our families,” Villasana said.

Starting at 6 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 7 at 1243 National City Boulevard, several street vendors will voice their concerns during public comment at National City’s Council meeting on the current regulations to sell food.

WATCH RELATED: Viral National City taco man raised $25K thanks to Tiktok star and community support

Local union helps out families in National City affected by flood waters

Monday’s flood waters, which caused so much damage across San Diego, are also bringing out the best of volunteer spirit.Such is the case in National City where volunteers are helping some 150 families in a mobile home park get their lives back together.The rain took less than an hour to change Happy Hollow Trailer Park to terrifying for homeowner Argelia Cobarrubias.“Literally like all of it. It just started coming in out of nowhere,” Resident Argelia Cobarrubias said. ...

Monday’s flood waters, which caused so much damage across San Diego, are also bringing out the best of volunteer spirit.

Such is the case in National City where volunteers are helping some 150 families in a mobile home park get their lives back together.

The rain took less than an hour to change Happy Hollow Trailer Park to terrifying for homeowner Argelia Cobarrubias.

“Literally like all of it. It just started coming in out of nowhere,” Resident Argelia Cobarrubias said.

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The water and debris rose underneath Cobarrubias’ mobile home and the homes of all her neighbors. The water line in some places was as high as five feet.

Argelia showed NBC 7 around her home. There is little to salvage. She lost two sofas, two beds, clothes and keepsakes.

“It’s a lot you know. You don’t know where to start and your mind is like you don’t know,“ Cobarrubias said.

On Tuesday afternoon, 20 Carpenters from Union Local 619 came to the rescue with their trucks.

“We’re part of the community. We live here, we grew up here “ Union Representative Jesse Garcia said.

The group was summoned by National City District Two Councilman Jose Rodriguez who saw the need to help out the more than 100 families.

“It’s a health hazard so folks can’t live with that. You can’t sleep on a mattress covered in dirty water,“ Councilman Rodriguez said.

The after effects of a flood are particularly dangerous to those suffering respiratory illnesses and some other health problems.

The volunteers managed to fill and overfill 10 double-sized dumpsters in just about six hours.

“They are doing a great job, they have been helping us a lot,” Cobarrubias said.

It is still a ways from getting back to normal, but homeowners see it as a start.

Members of the Carpenter’s Union say they will return Wednesday to help Encanto flood victims and residents on Imperial Avenue.

National City cannabis-consumption lounge to host first session in the spring

Imagine a place where people can go pick a pre-rolled joint from a menu and enjoy it right at their table surrounded by friends. Think of it as a neighborhood brewery, but instead of beer, marijuana is on tap.“A safe space to consume cannabis has always been a big hope of ours, and we’re there now, so we're excited to provide that for the community,” said Alex Ayon, co-owner of the soon-to-open Sessions by the Bay in National City.The nearly 16,000-square-foot, two-story will be located in ...

Imagine a place where people can go pick a pre-rolled joint from a menu and enjoy it right at their table surrounded by friends. Think of it as a neighborhood brewery, but instead of beer, marijuana is on tap.

“A safe space to consume cannabis has always been a big hope of ours, and we’re there now, so we're excited to provide that for the community,” said Alex Ayon, co-owner of the soon-to-open Sessions by the Bay in National City.

The nearly 16,000-square-foot, two-story will be located in the city's tourist commercial zone at 700 Bay Marina Drive, the former location of California College San Diego.

Artist's renderings show what the Sessions By the Bay marijuana lounge in National City might look like if its prospective operators clear a final approval hurdle. Renderings by Heleo Architecture + Design

In partnership with the Sycuan Tribal Development Corporation, Ayon and his wife are getting ready to start renovation work to create San Diego County’s first marijuana consumption lounge.

“There’s going to be [non-alcoholic] non-cannabis drinks and beverages, along with cannabis products people will be able to consume in a lounge-type environment,” said Ayon.

Music and other activities are also in the plans, and a partnership with a nearby restaurant is in the works.

“We get emails every day asking if we’re open yet [from] people coming from out of town,” Ayon said. “I think it's really going to hit.”

The city council approved the project last year, along with three other cannabis-business development agreements, in and effort to increase tax revenue and attract tourists.

The idea isn’t universally popular, however. National City mayor Ron Morrison has been against the project since it was proposed.

As a councilman at the time, he was the only one who voted against it.

“There's not much of a track record on lounges, and we are a small city," Morrison said. "We aren't going to have a whole lot of oversight enforcement or anything else. That's difficult. So I'm still staying on the safe route.”

The National City cannabis lounge will be one of only a few similar businesses in the state.

“This is not anti-cannabis or anything else along that line, but it’s trying to look at what's best for our community,” said Morrison.

Meanwhile, Ayon guarantees the business will operate with the community's safety in mind.

“People are getting checked in," Ayon said. "We’re going to be making sure that they are abiding by the rules and regulations."

Alcohol and tobacco consumption will not be allowed inside the lounge, customers must be 21 years or older to enter and all cannabis that is being consumed must be purchased on-site.

Widespread flooding from rare, explosive rain event prompts dozens of rescues, destroys homes, snarls travel

A huge pool of Pacific moisture unleashed explosive rain on San Diego County Monday, flooding neighborhoods from the South Bay to Oceanside, turning roadways into rivers, prompting dozens of rescues and knocking out power to thousands.Residents in southeastern San Diego climbed onto their roofs as rising waters swept into their homes — flooding so powerful it lifted cars and dropped them on top of other cars. Fire crews used ladders as bridges, stretching them across flooded areas to reach trapped residents. At Balboa Elementary...

A huge pool of Pacific moisture unleashed explosive rain on San Diego County Monday, flooding neighborhoods from the South Bay to Oceanside, turning roadways into rivers, prompting dozens of rescues and knocking out power to thousands.

Residents in southeastern San Diego climbed onto their roofs as rising waters swept into their homes — flooding so powerful it lifted cars and dropped them on top of other cars. Fire crews used ladders as bridges, stretching them across flooded areas to reach trapped residents. At Balboa Elementary School, water as deep as 3 feet outside prompted fire crews to move the students and teachers up to the second floor.

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Michael Rios woke up Monday morning to water pouring into his apartment on National Avenue. With the water level 3 feet deep, he grabbed his Chihuahua, Maxey.

“I jumped out my living room window,” Rios said. “I heard my neighbor yelling that he couldn’t get out and he was trapped — so we had to break through his window to get him out.”

Once free, the pair helped a woman with a baby, and they all rushed to the second floor. “The cars and a dumpster looked like they were flowing down the street,” Rios recalled Monday night, a blanket around his shoulders, at the Red Cross shelter at Lincoln High School. “It was like a river.”

The deluge “really caused a lot of havoc,” San Diego Assistant Fire Chief David Gerboth said. Citywide, he said, there were well over 100 people rescued Monday. No deaths were reported.

“There were people stuck in cars in moving water, people stuck in the river, people stuck in homes that were flooded,” he said. “It’s been well over 10 years since we had an event that would compare.”

Forecasters had been expecting significant rain — but nothing like what San Diego County ultimately received.

During a three-hour period starting at 9 a.m., 3 inches of rain fell in National City, while 2 inches fell at San Diego International Airport, the National Weather Service said. The rain cells also appeared to contain lightning, leading forecasters to advise the airport to temporarily stop fueling aircraft during one of the busiest periods of the day.

“We almost never get rainfall that intense during a short period like that,” said Ivory Small, a weather service forecaster with more than 40 years of experience.

They thought the core of the system would curl into northern Baja California. Computer models didn’t give clear, advance noticed that it would instead collide with the 21-mile-long sliver of San Clemente Island, widely used for military exercises. The system also came straight in from the west, rather than taking a less direct path.

The collision basically tore open the plumes of moisture, causing a deluge — upwards of 1 inch of rain per hour in parts of southern San Diego County, overwhelming drainage systems.

Preliminary figures also showed that the airport got 2.70 inches of rain between midnight and 4 p.m. — the most that’s ever fallen on a January day in San Diego, a record dating back to 1850. It was also the fifth wettest day ever recorded in the city.

The deluge wiped out a 2.5-inch rainfall deficit in San Diego, and greatly tamped down the threat of wildfires. But it caused plenty of damage and prompted San Diego Mayor Todd Gloria to declare a local emergency.

Gloria said it was the first step toward receiving federal and state money to help rebuild damaged infrastructure and provide services. More than 100 homes in southeastern San Diego had been damaged or destroyed, he said.

In San Diego’s Southcrest neighborhood, crews also used boats and rescue boards to get scores of people from flooded homes on Beta Street and surrounding streets, fire officials said. Some waited on roofs to be rescued, as fast water swept up cars, dumping them onto other vehicles.

And rescue crews plucked about 45 stranded people from swollen rivers and soaked sites in the Tijuana River Valley and Mission Valley, Gerboth said.

“When you think about it, how heavy a car is, people don’t stand a chance in that,” Gerboth said. “I was surprised that the water had been so high and moved so swiftly.”

Monday’s storm came in the form of towering sheets of rain that fell fairly uniformly from Oceanside to the U.S.-Mexico border, instead of in just a handful of spots, which is more common. Soon, water began to pool on the surface of freeways, making driving perilous. And the winds began to bend trees. Imperial Beach got hit by a 48 mph gust.

Those who dared brave the freeways were slowed not just by rain but by flooding or crashes, including a jack-knifed big rig around noon on northound Interstate 15 at Interstate 8. At points throughout the day, flooding shut a stretch of state Route 78 in Oceanside — where the water was waist-high — as well Interstate 5 in downtown San Diego and state Routes 94 and 15 in southeastern San Diego.

It also halted trolley service in downtown San Diego and in East County and caused damage to all three lines, prompting delays even where trains were running. At times, rain blew sideways through car doors, creating puddles on the seats.

Homeless residents were hit especially hard.

Flooding forced evacuations at two sites, including Alpha Project’s tent shelter downtown, where water rose chest-high in some places. Officials said it wasn’t clear if the structure, at 16th Street and Newton Avenue, was even salvageable.

Hundreds of people were moved to facilities at Balboa Park. The city’s first designated camping area was also cleared.

By early afternoon, San Diego Gas & Electric listed more than 15,000 customers without electricity on the company’s outage map, mostly in southeastern San Diego. Many people had lights back on by nightfall.

The storm prompted early Monday dismissals and Tuesday closures at schools around the county.

The La Mesa-Spring Valley Elementary School District will close all of its schools Tuesday to assess and address damage, after six campuses — primarily in Spring Valley — were flooded so heavily that entire classrooms got soaked, said Superintendent David Feliciano. The district planned to reopen schools Wednesday.

And in rural East County, rain flooded classrooms and eroded hillsides at Jamul-Dulzura schools, which sent students home early Monday and hoped to reopen Tuesday. In her more than 25 years in the district, it was the first time Superintendent Liz Bystedt could remember the district closing a school due to a downpour.

In Tijuana, schools canceled classes, as Mexican authorities urged residents to not leave home unless necessary. Tijuana firefighters evacuated 140 people, including teachers and students, from two schools in the Otay Centenario area due to flooding, city officials said.

Emergency crews responded to at least 40 rain-related incidents, including two people rescued from inside their vehicles, nine vehicles stuck in water and four landslides. Power outages were also reported in Playas de Tijuana.

San Diego fire stations were fully staffed, administrators were assigned to work in the field, and rescue teams normally assigned to the beach and bay were sent to swift water scenes far from their usual shoreline.

The rain was also a challenge for San Diego State University faculty who began a week-long strike, along with their counterparts at all 23 California State University campuses, in an effort to pressure system executives to award them significantly higher wages.

Here is a sample of how much rain had fallen over a three-day period ending at 3 p.m. Monday:

Otay Mountain, 4.51 inches; Point Loma, 4.49 inches; National City, 4.21 inches; Palomar Mountain, 4.01 inches; La Mesa, 3.89 inches; Fallbrook, 3.40 inches; Dulzura Summit, 3.38 inches, San Diego International Airport, 3.29 inches; Lake Cuyamaca, 3.23 inches; Campo, 3.20 inches; Carlsbad Airport, 3.17 inches; Bonsall, 3.09 inches; Santee, 3.05 inches.

Encinitas, 2.93 inches; Fashion Valley, 2.88 inches; Volcan Mountain, 2.81 inches; Skyline, 2.77 inches; Lake Henshaw, 2.74 inches; Oceanside, 2.69 inches; Mount Laguna, 2.62 inches; Kearny Mesa, 2.59 inches; Montgomery Field, 2.58 inches; Vista, 2.55 inches; San Onofre, 2.52 inches; Mount Laguna, 2.51 inches; Brown Field; 2.49 inches; Lake Wohlford, 2.45 inches; Miramar Lake, 2.44 inches; Pine Valley, 2.44 inches; Alpine, 2.39 inches.

Julian, 2.33 inches; San Marcos, 2.16 inches; Rancho Bernardo, 2.15 inches; Ramona Airport, 2.12 inches; Santa Ysabel, 2.07 inches; Poway, 1.99 inches; San Diego Country Estates, 1.82 inches; Borrego Springs, 0.98 inches.

Staff writers Kristen Taketa, Blake Nelson, Alexandra Mendoza and Caleb Lunetta contributed reporting.

Rescue Mission could sell land next to its forthcoming National City shelter for housing

The San Diego Rescue Mission’s 7-acre property in National City — where a homeless shelter is set to open next spring — will be divided into two parcels, with the possibility of part of the site being used for multifamily housing.Planning commissioners on Monday unanimously approved dividing the land in half. It is located at 2400 Euclid Ave. near 24th Street, surrounded by mostly single-family homes.At 3.7 acres, the northern lot closest to 24th Street will be used for the 162-bed shelte...

The San Diego Rescue Mission’s 7-acre property in National City — where a homeless shelter is set to open next spring — will be divided into two parcels, with the possibility of part of the site being used for multifamily housing.

Planning commissioners on Monday unanimously approved dividing the land in half. It is located at 2400 Euclid Ave. near 24th Street, surrounded by mostly single-family homes.

At 3.7 acres, the northern lot closest to 24th Street will be used for the 162-bed shelter. The second parcel, at 3.5 acres, is vacant and has a wetland habitat on its southern portion.

The land previously was home to the South Bay Community Church, which had a kitchen, laundry, bathrooms and a playground. The church, two of its buildings, and a parking lot occupied about half of the 7 acres.

Last year, the Rescue Mission bought the property for $6 million with plans to convert the two buildings, one about 19,000 square feet and the other 3,300 square feet, into a navigation center that will offer shelter and meals. It will accept people from National City, Chula Vista and Imperial Beach. In December 2021, the National City Council granted the organization a conditional-use permit. The nonprofit is working toward raising about $12 million to cover operation and renovation costs, said CEO Donnie Dee. Its Every Heart Campaign will also raise funds for an East County navigation center and operations in Oceanside.

The 3.7 acres are sufficient for the shelter, said Edvin Liku, the Rescue Mission’s vice president of operations, and there are no set plans for what to do with the second parcel.

“One, we could develop (it) ourselves and build more affordable housing,” said Liku. “Or we could partner with a developer that has the money to do that. Or we could partner up with another nonprofit that provides affordable housing with a developer that can do that.”

The vacant lot’s zoning would allow multi-family residential development of up to 15 units per acre, said David Welch, a city associate planner.

With wetlands onsite, Commissioner Ricardo Sanchez raised concerns about their preservation should construction occur in the future. About a third of the 3.5-acre lot would be off-limits because of easements and the wetland, said Welch.

“Even if a good portion of the lot is not available for development, there’s still quite a bit there to provide for … multifamily housing,” he added.

Dee said the nonprofit’s priority is to open the National City navigation center before selling or marketing the second parcel to a housing developer.

“My guess is it would be something related to housing because that’s the greatest need, but that’s going to have to be a housing development that’s comfortable being next to a 162-bed shelter,” he said.

The City Council will not be required to vote on the matter.

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