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SHIPPING CONTAINERS IN Drexel Heights AZ

Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. Drexel Heights, AZ, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you with the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

Whether you need shipping containers for storage, office, moving, multi-purpose or custom use, we've got your back.

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STORAGE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Drexel Heights AZ

When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in Drexel Heights, AZ, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

Our certified experts modify containers to fit any of your business needs or events.

Our shipping container modifications can help improve or expand your business. We can customize containers to any size you need, so you can rest easy knowing you have enough space for your inventory, documents, equipment or services.

Here's why you should choose us for your container modifications:

  • We offer the highest quality modifications on the market.
  • Our certified fabricators have years of combined experience in container modifications. No other company in the industry matches our expertise.
  • We have modified thousands of containers over the past 25 years for foreign and domestic clients.
  • Our certified weld and quality control inspectors ensure everything is structurally sound and built to your specifications through every step of the process.
  • We can build multiple projects simultaneously in our 90,000 sq ft fabrication facility with consistent quality and a fast turnaround.
  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
  • Even after your custom container has been delivered, we still have your back. Our full-service staff can provide maintenance and quick modifications at your location.
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CONTAINERS SOLUTIONS IN Drexel Heights AZ

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STORAGE & OFFICES

When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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STORAGE & OFFICES

We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in Drexel Heights, AZ, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our shipping containers for rental, sale and modification in Drexel Heights, AZ, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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MOBILE OFFICE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Drexel Heights AZ

Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

CONTAINER SIZES AND TYPES

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

SMS-Single-Bay-Doors
10' Single Door Container
15' Single Door Container
20' Single Door Container
24' Single Door Container
30' Single Door Container
40' Single Door Container
45' Single Door Container
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24' Double Door Container
30' Double Door Container
40' Double Door Container

Standard Storage Containers for Rent

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10' Open Bay Offices
20' Open Bay Offices
40' Open Bay Offices
40' Office with Split Rooms
SMS-Office-Single-window-storage
20' Office/Storage Combo
24' Office/Storage Combo
40' Office/Storage Combo

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Up to six points for adding locks to your shipping container, including a high-security slide bolt for puck locks.

Extra-long lockbox to ensure you always have at least one lock keeping your mobile storage container safe from break-ins.

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Our 14-gauge corrugated steel containers are stronger than other storage solutions like pods.

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Latest News in Drexel Heights, AZ

3 Tucson-area fire districts turn to voters to help fund services, equipment

The Drexel Heights governing board is requesting to sell $8 million in general obligation bonds for projects including the construction of an administration and training facility, a new fire station, and the remodeling of a second station. It also is seeking to replace two pumper trucks.Fire Chief Douglas Chappell said the two stations slated for replacement or renovations are “in need of safety-related enhancements to protect the firefighters who live in the stations 24 hours a day.”The district also needs adequate...

The Drexel Heights governing board is requesting to sell $8 million in general obligation bonds for projects including the construction of an administration and training facility, a new fire station, and the remodeling of a second station. It also is seeking to replace two pumper trucks.

Fire Chief Douglas Chappell said the two stations slated for replacement or renovations are “in need of safety-related enhancements to protect the firefighters who live in the stations 24 hours a day.”

The district also needs adequate training facilities for firefighters to continue to refine their knowledge and skills, said Chappell. He also said the district needs to replace its aging fleet.

If Proposition 459 passes, the interest rate for the bonds would not exceed 7 percent per year and be paid off in 20 years. The cost to each property owner would be about 34 cents per $100 of assessed valuation, or about $30 a year for an average home in the district, said Chappell.

Drexel Heights’ annual operating budget is about $10 million and it employs 81 firefighters and five civilian workers.

The district covers 60 square miles and has about 50,000 residents. The boundaries roughly are the Tucson Mountains on the north and the Tohono O’odham Nation on the south, and South Mission Road on the east to West Valencia Road where it dead ends at Ajo Highway on the west.

Picture Rocks Fire & Medical District

The Picture Rocks board of directors is asking for a temporary budget override for five years that would bring in about $80,000 annually to maintain services and fire trucks.

“We are bringing in 40 percent less in revenue a year than we were before the home market started to crash. It hit us in 2012,” said Fire Chief Brett Lane. “We have kept our fire trucks for 25 years while most departments only keep their trucks for five years.”

In the past five years, the district has received $3 million in grants, which have helped maintain services, Lane said. He said the district has a fleet of 15 vehicles, which includes fire engines, ambulances and water tankers.

If Proposition 460 passes, it will allow for the annual levies to be not more than $3.50 per $100 of assessed valuation starting with the 2018 tax year through the 2022 tax year. The cost to each property owner, on average, would be an increase of about $6 a year in secondary tax, said Lane.

Picture Rocks’ annual operating budget is $1.8 million and the district employs 22 firefighters and two civilian workers.

The district covers 100 square miles and has 10,000 residents. The boundaries roughly are West Avra Valley Road on the north to West Mile Wide Road on the south, and Saguaro National Park on the east to North Avra Road on the west.

Avra Valley Fire District

The Avra Valley governing board is requesting to adopt a temporary levy override for five years to generate about $120,000 annually for the district to maintain firefighter jobs, its vehicles and to purchase medical equipment and safety gear.

“We are running out of options,” said Fire Chief Brian Delfs, explaining that the district seeks grants now to help pay for services.

“Our property values are down, and we are surviving off the same revenues of 2008 when the state Legislature capped our tax rate at $3.25 per $100 of assessed valuation,” explained Delfs. “The Legislature capped the tax rate before the 2008 property market value crashed. This is really hurting the smaller fire districts,” he said.

If voters approve Proposition 461, the secondary property tax rate limit would increase up to $3.50 per $100 of assessed valuation. The cost to the average homeowner would be an increase of $21 a year, said Delfs.

Avra Valley’s annual operating budget is $3.9 million and it employs 42 firefighters and two civilian workers.

The district, which extends into Pinal County, covers 325 square miles and has about 12,000 residents. The boundaries roughly are Picacho Peak on the north to West Manville Road on the south, and the Tucson Mountains on the east to the Tohono O’odham Nation on the west. In Pinal County, coverage includes 125 square miles that are east and west of Interstate 10.

Granite Mountain Hotshots remembered across Arizona ten years after their death

The main ceremony was in Prescott but the Granite Mountain Hotshots Memorial State Park is open year-round.TUCSON, Ariz. (13 News) - Across Arizona, firefighters and those close to the firefighting community were remembering the Granite Mountain Hotshots Friday. One of the main ceremonies was in Prescott, with elected officials and family members in attendance.The lawn in front of the Yavapai County Courthouse was packed with people and scores of firefighters attended. Both at that ceremony and elsewhere, the Yarnell 19 are h...

The main ceremony was in Prescott but the Granite Mountain Hotshots Memorial State Park is open year-round.

TUCSON, Ariz. (13 News) - Across Arizona, firefighters and those close to the firefighting community were remembering the Granite Mountain Hotshots Friday. One of the main ceremonies was in Prescott, with elected officials and family members in attendance.

The lawn in front of the Yavapai County Courthouse was packed with people and scores of firefighters attended. Both at that ceremony and elsewhere, the Yarnell 19 are honored.

Nineteen bells tolled for nineteen names, with William Warneke being the Granite Mountain Hotshot from the Tucson area. But the featured speaker in Prescott on Friday was 16-year-old Ryder Ashcraft.

“You’re the man of the house while I’m gone,” he remembered as the last words he heard from his father, Andrew Ashcraft, another member of the Granite Mountain Hotshots before he left for work ten years ago.

“How could I have known in that moment that my dad would step back, fade into the shadows of my room and leave me for the rest of my life with only faint memories?” Ryder Ashcraft said to the crowd in Prescott.

There was plenty of effort to keep their memories from becoming faint, with a proclamation read by Governor Katie Hobbs.

“Now, therefore, I, Katie Hobbs, Governor of the state of Arizona, do hereby proclaim June 30, 2023, as Granite Mountain Hotshots Day,” she read as the crowd applauded.

To help never forget, the trail from the Granite Mountain Hotshots Memorial State Park, south of Yarnell, follows the final steps of the crew with markers for each member lost.

“One after another, and it just builds up after miles of walking over the top and then when you see the final resting place, it’s just, taking it all in is just, just almost surreal,” said Dave Shafer, retired firefighter from Drexel Heights Fire District who rode his motorcycle with his wife, Joan, up from Tucson to the park to the remember the 19. “The sacrifice they made, it can’t be forgotten.”

And in Prescott, that was the challenge many spoke about.

“May we never forget their names, their sacrifice, and the extraordinary impact they had on all our lives,” Thomas Torres, state forester for the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management, said to the crowd.

For Ryder Ashcraft, the best way to honor them is in how we choose to live.

“My dad always said it’s never too late to become what you might have been. I’ve chosen to adopt my dad’s motto and be better. Will you?” he said.

Be sure to subscribe to the 13 News YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/@13newskold

Copyright 2023 13 News. All rights reserved.

New academy begins as recruitment gets tougher at GVFD

The Green Valley Fire District kicks off its newest training academy this week, looking to add over a dozen new recruits to the roster once the program ends in October.The eight-week training program – a combined academy that serves GVFD, Drexel Heights Fire District and the Tubac Fire District – introduces the fundamentals of firefighting as well as agency-specific operating procedures. After graduating, the 13 recruits will go through a probationary year, which is an additional year of continued training, with more hands...

The Green Valley Fire District kicks off its newest training academy this week, looking to add over a dozen new recruits to the roster once the program ends in October.

The eight-week training program – a combined academy that serves GVFD, Drexel Heights Fire District and the Tubac Fire District – introduces the fundamentals of firefighting as well as agency-specific operating procedures. After graduating, the 13 recruits will go through a probationary year, which is an additional year of continued training, with more hands-on experience.

This year’s cohort ranges in age from 20 to 34, and comes from a variety of backgrounds – some are students answering the call to serve after graduation, others are embarking on a career change.

“They’re sort of starting out on a new phase of life, and that’s really exciting,” said GVFD Chief Chuck Wunder.

But filling this year’s academy was no easy task – as more firefighters reach retirement age in the department, fewer applicants are lining up to take their places.

For the first time in more than two decades with the GVFD, Wunder said he’s seen the department struggle to fill vacancies.

“We’re still getting qualified candidates, we’re just not getting as many as we used to. We used to say winning the lottery was getting a job at the fire department. Now, the odds are a lot different,” he said.

Even as this new recruitment cycle begins, Wunder and his team have already begun to plan – and worry – for next year.

Pursuing a career in the fire service demands a tough combination of mental and physical stamina, even in non-COVID times. Long hours, heavy-lifting, hot blazes and high-intensity emergency situations can take a toll on any firefighter’s health.

“Then, factor in the changing nature of our work with COVID, the increasing call volume, the ongoing issues with stress, anxiety and mental health,” Wunder said.

“That’s not your best recruitment poster ever,” he said with a laugh.

Some firefighters in the industry may choose to leave for higher pay, to seek employment with a larger agency, or because they were “test-driving” a job in the fire service, and weren’t necessarily career-minded to begin with, though Wunder said he’s seen very few examples of that in Green Valley.

The main challenge he sees facing both recruitment and retention is the desire many early career individuals have for a work-life balance.

“I think the concept of ‘work-life balance’ is real, but I think a different generation didn’t have that same priority,” Wunder said.

“The nature of our work doesn’t lend itself to that. You work a 24-hour shift. You come home exhausted. Can I be a good husband, can I be a good mother, can I be a good father or wife after I’ve been up four times after midnight?”

The resulting fatigue of the job, coupled with the effects of the pandemic, can also take a toll on families.

The nurse practitioner on-staff with GVFD has seen a dramatic uptick over the last year in requests for assistance with mental health, stress and anxiety, especially related to families, Wunder explained. As a result, the crew at GVFD has been working harder than ever to cover shifts and support crew members who need time off to take care of themselves and their loved ones.

“I’m super proud of how our cews have responded, and I think the mental health aspect of our job has become more well-recognized, but it does take a toll on their families and makes our job a little less attractive,” he said.

A shift in recruitment numbers has meant a shift in recruitment practices for GVFD next year, Wunder said.

“For a long time, our recruits came to us. You’d get hundreds, if not thousands, of applicants, depending on the size of your department, and so you’d just kind of scoop the cream off the top,” he said.

Now, Wunder says increasing community engagement and outreach, particularly in local school districts, will be a strategic focus for his department moving forward.

“I’d love to reach those young women and men there at the high school level and say, ‘Have you ever considered a career in the fire service? How can we encourage you in that way?’”

Joining the fire service also comes with its own financial hurdles – Green Valley Fire requires new recruits to have completed their EMT certification, which can cost a student at Pima Community College close to $2,000.

Wunder said GVFD is evaluating how to reduce those expenses for new recruits, potentially by offering those courses internally.

Above all, Wunder said by being truthful and candid about the job itself, he hopes to attract recruits best suited for the current challenges, with a deep desire to serve their community.

With this year’s monsoon bringing record rainfall to the region, fire departments have seen a dramatic drop in wildland fire calls this season. But an active monsoon brings its own challenges, Wunder says.

Between heavy rains, downed power lines, swiftwater rescues and lightning-sparked fires, storm response has taken up a majority of the fire department’s time over the last few months.

“There’s been multiple days where I’ve had to charge my phone multiple times a day just to get through,” Wunder said.

Green Valley Fire District has also been coordinating with other Pima County agencies, like Regional Flood Control and the Office of Emergency Management, to respond to widespread storm damage at times.

And while parts of the Southwest cope with record rainfall, wildfires raging in the Pacific Northwest have become an increasing concern and drain on resources for firefighters out West, as the region continues to suffer from a historical drought.

GVFD has already deployed several crews to support fire operations in Montana, Washington and California.

“We’ve got the rain, and now they’ve got the fire, so they are the critical needs for resources right now,” Wunder said.

But the burst of desert vegetation at home does present a concern for the drier months ahead, Wunder said. Depending on how early the heat comes, next year’s fire season could continue it’s slow creep into spring.

“That’s not historically something we would consider fire season. We’re usually more into May, but it’s held true the last three seasons that we already have deployments in April,” Wunder said.

But regardless of when the heat returns, Wunder guarantees his crews – with some new members in tow – will be ready.

Mary Glen Hatcher | 520-547-9740

Crews rescue drivers stuck in vehicles

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TUCSON, Ariz. (KGUN) - We're tracking the lastest Monsoon activity in Southern Arizona.

FORECAST | RADAR | ALERTS

11:33 a.m.

Here's our first look at the rainfall totals so far from storms overnight and this morning:

11:02 a.m.

Need sandbags? There are a number of places you can grab some for free around southern Arizona. Check out the map below for locations, hours and details:

10:27 a.m.

TPD reports that power has been restored to most customers affected by the morning outage. Check the outage map for updates.

Northwest Fire crews rescued a driver stuck near Grier Road by Sandario Road.

9:17 a.m.

Northwest Fire says their crews rescued a driver near Silverbell and Sweetwater Drive earlier this morning.

9:06 a.m.

8:57 a.m.

Pima County Sheriff's Department says there are multiple downed power lines on West Speedway Blvd..

8:29 a.m.

Northwest Fire is warning drivers to look out for flooded roadways.

8:10 a.m.

Nearly 2,000 Tucson Electric Power customers -- mostly west of Interstate 10 -- lost power in the 8 a.m. hour.

According to the TEP outage map, there was no cause or expected time of restoration.

8:03 a.m.

According to Golder Ranch Fire, a house was hit by lightning near Mountain View and Clubhouse.

7:42 a.m.

Two inches of rain have been reported near Ironwood Wood Drive west of Silverbell Road. Flash flooding is expected.

7:23 a.m.

The National Weather Service extended its Flash Flood Warning to 10:15 a.m. Rainfall of up to two inches is expected in areas including Tucson, Casas Adobes, Drexel Heights, Flowing Wells, South Tucson, Three Points, Tucson Estates, Saguaro National Park West, Valencia West, Catalina Foothills, Picture Rocks and Ryan Airfield.

6:45 a.m.

The National Weather Service issued a Significant Weather Advisory for North Central Pima and Pinal Counties until 7:30 a.m.

The service warned of winds faster than 40mph in areas including Eloy, Kearny, Dudleyville, Picacho, Chui-Chu, Picacho Peak State Park, Red Rock, Cactus Forest, Cockleburr, North Komelik, Kohatk, Jack Rabbit, Shopishk, Kelvin and East Chui-Chu.

6:33 a.m.

The National Weather Service issued a Flash Flood Warning for northeastern Pima County and southeastern Pinal County until 9:30 a.m.

6:13 a.m.

The National Weather Service issued an Urban and Small Stream Flood Advisory for northeastern Pima County and southeastern Pinal County.

The advisory lasts until 8 a.m. Wednesday.

Heavy rain from thunderstorms is causing the flooding, bringing between 0.5 and `1.5 inches of rain.

Areas subject to flooding include Catalina, Oro Valley, Marana, Oracle, Saddlebrooke, Tortolita, Mount Lemmon/Summerhaven, Catalina State Park, Campo Bonito, Oracle Junction, Biosphere 2 and Dove Mountain.

MORE WEATHER

Hourly Forecast

7 Day

Radar

10 Cheapest Cities To Live in Arizona

A lot of factors have been drawing more and more people to move to Arizona, including a cheaper cost of living, a warm climate, a solid economy and more. While the state has a history of being more affordable, some Arizona cities are uniquely cheap and great places to consider living.To find the 10 cheapest cities to live in Arizona, GOBankingRates gathered a list of all the cities in the state and sourced populat...

A lot of factors have been drawing more and more people to move to Arizona, including a cheaper cost of living, a warm climate, a solid economy and more. While the state has a history of being more affordable, some Arizona cities are uniquely cheap and great places to consider living.

To find the 10 cheapest cities to live in Arizona, GOBankingRates gathered a list of all the cities in the state and sourced population and median household income from the U.S. Census American Consumer Survey. The top 100 cities were narrowed down by key expenditures, including groceries, healthcare, utilities, housing, transportation and miscellaneous costs, and they were ranked according to overall annual expenditures.

San Luis

Healthcare is painfully expensive in San Luis at 36.3% higher than the rest of the nation, or $7,431 per year. However, housing is quite affordable here, at 37.6% lower than the national average, or $8,273 per year.

Kingman

It’s healthcare that’s taking the biggest bite of income in Kingman, where it is 31.1% above the national average, around $7,148 per year. In contrast, residents only pay a few thousand dollars more for their housing, which is $10,063 per year.

Green Valley

In Green Valley, all expenditures fall below the national average except for utilities, which are just 2.3% above, running you $4,320 annually.

Sierra Vista

Healthcare is almost 6.2% higher than the national average here in Sierra Vista, at $5,790 per year. However, housing is reasonable, with an average annual expenditure of $10,461.

Drexel Heights

In Drexel Heights, energy is where most of your money will go. Utilities and transportation are both above the national average, running $4,341 and $5,966 annually, respectively.

Eloy

For a small city, Eloy is quite affordable overall, but you’ll be paying more for healthcare and utilities here — the average annual costs are $5,474 and $4,531 respectively.

Rio Rico

In Rio Rico, while most expenditures are under the national average, utilities are significantly higher at $4,464 per year, which is more than half the cost of annual housing costs, which run around $8,167.

Nogales

Nogales is another city where housing comes quite affordably, 48.2% below the national average, at $6,921 per year. Transportation is also extra affordable here, at nearly 30% lower than national average.

Douglas

In the small city of Douglas, healthcare and utilities will take the biggest chunk out of your income, at $5,790 and $4,489 per year, respectively.

Flowing Wells

Flowing Wells takes the No. 1 spot because all expenditures are below the national average, except for utilities, which are 2.1% above, averaging $4,312 per year. Housing is the cheapest on this list, at 66.6% below the national average, or just $4,428 per year.

More From GOBankingRates

Methodology: To find the Cheapest Cities to Live in Arizona, GOBankingRates gathered a list of all the cities in Arizona with their population and median household income sourced from the U.S. Census American Consumer Survey. The top 50 cities by population were kept for the study and for each city the; [1] Grocery cost of living, [2] Healthcare cost of living, [3] Utilities cost of living, [4] Housing cost of living, [5] Transportation cost of living and [6] Miscellaneous cost of living were sourced from Sperling’s Best Places. Each cost-of-living index was multiplied by its respective average annual expenditure category sourced from the Bureau of Labor Statistics Consumer Expenditure Survey to find an average cost for each expenditure category within each city. The expenditures were summed up and sorted to show the cheapest places to live in Arizona. All data was collected and is up to date as of July 19, 2023.

Photo Disclaimer: Please note photos are for representational purposes only. As a result, some of the photos might not reflect the locations listed in this article.

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