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Southwest Mobile Storage is a family-owned shipping container business founded in 1995. Our strength for more than 25 years comes from the specialized knowledge and passion of our people, along with serving over 24,000 commercial, construction and residential customers. Our 90,000 sq. ft. facility and expertise in maintaining, manufacturing, and delivering corrugated steel containers are unrivaled in the industry.

While the rental side of our business is regional, with branches throughout the Southwest, our container sales and modification operations are nationwide and becoming global. Green Valley, AZ, offers a wide selection of portable offices and mobile storage containers you can rent, buy or modify.

Our experts in container rental, sales and customization are committed to providing you with the highest quality and best experience from service to delivery - our reputation depends on it.

Whether you need shipping containers for storage, office, moving, multi-purpose or custom use, we've got your back.

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STORAGE CONTAINERS AVAILABLE IN Green Valley AZ

When you choose mobile storage containers over traditional storage facilities, you get more space for less, plus the convenience of onsite, 24/7 access to your valuables. And if you can't keep a container at your location, we offer you the flexibility to store it at our place instead. Rest assured, our high-quality storage containers will keep your items safe from weather, pests and break-ins. When you need to rent, buy or modify mobile storage containers in Green Valley, AZ, look no further than Southwest Mobile Storage.

Our certified experts modify containers to fit any of your business needs or events.

Our shipping container modifications can help improve or expand your business. We can customize containers to any size you need, so you can rest easy knowing you have enough space for your inventory, documents, equipment or services.

Here's why you should choose us for your container modifications:

  • We offer the highest quality modifications on the market.
  • Our certified fabricators have years of combined experience in container modifications. No other company in the industry matches our expertise.
  • We have modified thousands of containers over the past 25 years for foreign and domestic clients.
  • Our certified weld and quality control inspectors ensure everything is structurally sound and built to your specifications through every step of the process.
  • We can build multiple projects simultaneously in our 90,000 sq ft fabrication facility with consistent quality and a fast turnaround.
  • Most of our competition outsources their modifications, so you don’t know who is doing the work or how much markup is involved.
  • Even after your custom container has been delivered, we still have your back. Our full-service staff can provide maintenance and quick modifications at your location.
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When you own a business or manage one, it's crucial to have efficient, affordable ways to store inventory and supplies, whether it's to grow your business or adapt to changes in the market. Renting or buying storage containers to keep at your business eliminates the cost and hassles of sending your staff to offsite storage facilities. If you're in need of a custom solution, we'll modify shipping containers into whatever you need to grow your business. Whether it's new paint with your branding, a durable container laboratory for scientific research, or mobile wastewater treatment units,our unrivaled fabrication facility and modification expertshave you covered.

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We know how important it is for your construction company to have reliable, secure storage and comfortable office space at your jobsite. All our storage containers for rent in Green Valley, AZ, come standard with first-rate multi-point locking systems, so you can rest assured your tools, equipment and materials are safe and secure. We also understand that construction can run long or finish early. We'll accommodate your schedule, even on short notice, and will prorate your rent after your first 28 days, so you don't have to pay for more than you actually need. With us, you also won't have to deal with the hassle of a large call center. Instead, you'll have dedicated sales representatives who will work with you for the entirety of your business with us.

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Get 24/7 access to your personal belongings without ever leaving your property. Whether you need short-term storage during home renovations or to permanently expand your home's storage space, our shipping containers for rental, sale and modification in Green Valley, AZ, are the most convenient, secure solution. With our first-rate security features, using a storage container for your holiday decorations, lawn equipment, furniture, and other items will keep your contents safer than if you used a shed. Don't have room on your property? We also offer the option to keep your container at our secure facility. Our experienced team is here to help you find the perfect solution for your needs.

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Our ground-mounted mobile offices provide comfortable, temperature-controlled workspace without the extra expenses associated with portable office trailers, like stairs, metal skirting or setup and removal fees. Whether you only need one workspace, storage to go with it, or separate rooms in one container, we've got you covered. With our 500 years of combined container fabrication experience, rest easy knowing your mobile office is of the highest quality craftsmanship when you choose Southwest Mobile Storage.

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10' Single Door Container
15' Single Door Container
20' Single Door Container
24' Single Door Container
30' Single Door Container
40' Single Door Container
45' Single Door Container
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24' Double Door Container
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10' Open Bay Offices
20' Open Bay Offices
40' Open Bay Offices
40' Office with Split Rooms
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20' Office/Storage Combo
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40' Office/Storage Combo

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Up to six points for adding locks to your shipping container, including a high-security slide bolt for puck locks.

Extra-long lockbox to ensure you always have at least one lock keeping your mobile storage container safe from break-ins.

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Latest News in Green Valley, AZ

Man arrested in Green Valley fire

A 38-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of starting a structure fire in Green Valley, officials say.Deputies were called to the 16400 block of South Delgado Road about 4:45 p.m. Thursday for a reported structure fire, according to news release Tuesday from the Pima County Sheriff's Department.Across the SkyBetter weather forecasts? Drones could be the key00:00:00 / 00:36:05Better weather forecasts? Drones could be the keyIn order to predict how the weather will change, an accurate picture of...

A 38-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of starting a structure fire in Green Valley, officials say.

Deputies were called to the 16400 block of South Delgado Road about 4:45 p.m. Thursday for a reported structure fire, according to news release Tuesday from the Pima County Sheriff's Department.

Across the Sky

Better weather forecasts? Drones could be the key

00:00:00 / 00:36:05

Better weather forecasts? Drones could be the key

In order to predict how the weather will change, an accurate picture of what's happening now is needed. While current conditions at the surface are well known thanks to weather stations, there are significant gaps in the data higher up in the atmosphere. Unmanned aerial vehicles, better known as drones, could help fill in those gaps significantly. Dr. Jamey Jacob from Oklahoma State University is leading the charge on bringing drones into the field of meteorology. He joins the podcast this week to talk about what kind of data drones can collect and the advantages they have over weather balloons and airplanes. He also discusses the current limitations and what will be needed before they can be used on a large-scale to improve weather forecasts. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. Check out our sponsor, WeatherCall NexGen! Receive precise, location-specific weather alerts via phone, text, or email. With over a decade of experience, WeatherCall delivers pinpoint accuracy for your exact address, ensuring no surprises. Explore the WeatherCall difference today! Visit: https://weathercallservices.com/lee-enterprises About the Across the Sky podcast A weekly podcast discussing all things weather and climate. The podcast is hosted by the meteorologists of the Lee Weather Team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia.

36:05

Jan 29, 2024

What can be done to reduce weather-related car crashes?

Weather and cars do not get along. Each year, about 21% of car crashes in the United States involve adverse weather conditions, resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. We can't prevent bad weather, but new technology is being developed to keep drivers safer. Dr. Scott Mackaro, the head of Insights and Innovation for Vaisala Xweather, joins the podcast this week to talk about road weather data. Why is it so difficult for drivers to receive accurate information on road conditions? What can be done to make it more easily accessible? The team also looks ahead to the future and discusses how self-driving cars could be the ultimate key to minimizing weather-related crashes and when that day may come. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast A weekly podcast discussing all things weather and climate. The podcast is hosted by the meteorologists of the Lee Weather Team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. Check out our sponsor, WeatherCall NexGen! Receive precise, location-specific weather alerts via phone, text, or email. With over a decade of experience, WeatherCall delivers pinpoint accuracy for your exact address, ensuring no surprises. Explore the WeatherCall difference today! Visit: https://weathercallservices.com/lee-enterprises

42:03

Jan 24, 2024

2023 was the hottest year on record. What's next?

According to NOAA and NASA, 2023 was the hottest year on record, as greenhouse gases from fossil fuels continue to increase. Renewable energy sources are scaling up, but how fast is the transitioning happening, and what are the roadblocks? Andrew Dessler from Texas A&M joins the team to talk candidly about energy solutions to climate change. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast The weekly weather podcast is hosted on a rotation by the Lee Weather team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

42:03

Jan 15, 2024

Feeling blue? It could be seasonal affective disorder

The month of January is often considered the most depressing of the year. The holidays are over, credit card bills are coming due, and the days are short and cold. While many suffer from the winter blues, for some it's a more serious condition known as seasonal affective disorder or SAD for short. Jasmine Wilson with the Ascension Medical Group joins the podcast this week for an in-depth discussion of SAD and how the weather plays a role in triggering it. She explains the symptoms that are characteristic of SAD, who is most vulnerable, and what treatments are available to overcome it. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast The weekly weather podcast is hosted on a rotation by the Lee Weather team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

35:08

Jan 8, 2024

The 10 biggest weather stories of 2023

2024 has arrived, but we can't start a new year without looking back at the previous year. There was plenty of weather to talk about in 2023. The United States saw a record number of billion-dollar weather disasters, so picking the biggest weather stories of the year was not easy. Ten events stood out to our meteorologists the most though. The team discusses each one from the beginning of the year until the end. From a phenomenal deluge in Florida, unprecedented levels of smoke, to a raging firestorm in Hawaii, the weather in 2023 will not soon be forgotten. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast The weekly weather podcast is hosted on a rotation by the Lee Weather team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

51:39

Jan 2, 2024

Listen now and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | YouTube | RSS Feed | SoundStack | All Of Our Podcasts

The fire was quickly put out and Joseph Martinez was arrested, the release said. No one was injured.

Investigators say Martinez had been lighting pieces of paper on fire near the structure, before it caught fire.

Martinez booked into the Pima County jail on suspicion of reckless burning.

Green Valley Fire District takes next steps following annexation approval

TUCSON, Ariz. (13 News) - The Green Valley Fire District Governing Board has voted to approve the annexing of northern Sahuarita, and the chief said there is much to be done before they can take over on July 1, 2024.“We were so grateful for the support we received both from the businesses and residents alike,” said Chief Chuck Wunder of the Green Valley Fire District.Wunder said the first step for the department will be to hire new employees. They are currently interviewing Rural Metro employees interested in making...

TUCSON, Ariz. (13 News) - The Green Valley Fire District Governing Board has voted to approve the annexing of northern Sahuarita, and the chief said there is much to be done before they can take over on July 1, 2024.

“We were so grateful for the support we received both from the businesses and residents alike,” said Chief Chuck Wunder of the Green Valley Fire District.

Wunder said the first step for the department will be to hire new employees. They are currently interviewing Rural Metro employees interested in making the move to Green Valley Fire.

“If we have to supplement after that, we’ll look to do additional hirings to make sure that we’re prepared for that July 1, startup,” said Wunder.

Wunder said they will be looking to fill other roles.

“People that can work on our facilities and our fire stations to keep them up to the standards we need. We’ll be looking at a warehouse clerk to support operations and logistics positions like that, that can help. Also, administrative positions,” said Wunder.

The board has also recently signed off on the purchase of Rural Metro Fire Station 79 in Sahuarita from Sharpe and Associates. Rural Metro will continue to work out of this station until Green Valley Fire takes over in July.

Current northern Sahuarita customers will be on a month-to-month basis with the company. When Green Valley Fire takes over, the chief said they can sleep well knowing they will continue to be protected.

“They should feel confident knowing that Green valley fire is going to provide service to them as well through a similar model,” said Wunder.

Green Valley Fire said nine new schools will also come under their jurisdiction. The chief sees this as an opportunity to increase their community engagement, especially with the younger generation.

“All of my public safety partners are looking for quality individuals to hire in the future and having these young adults and a chance to visit with them, encourage them inspire and hopefully for a career as a great opportunity,” said Wunder.

Be sure to subscribe to the 13 News YouTube channel: www.youtube.com/@13newskold

Copyright 2023 13 News. All rights reserved.

Trout are coming to Green Valley Lakes

I spend a great deal of time fishing all three of the Green Valley lakes. These beautiful, well-maintained lakes are easily accessible to residents and visitors to Payson. They are about a mile west of State Route 87 on Main Street.The Green Valley lakes will be stocked with trout starting the week of October 16. This is when the water temperatures in the lakes are finally cool enough for trout. The normal stocking schedule is every two weeks from mid-October to mid-May.There is an interesting wildlife event that coincides with...

I spend a great deal of time fishing all three of the Green Valley lakes. These beautiful, well-maintained lakes are easily accessible to residents and visitors to Payson. They are about a mile west of State Route 87 on Main Street.

The Green Valley lakes will be stocked with trout starting the week of October 16. This is when the water temperatures in the lakes are finally cool enough for trout. The normal stocking schedule is every two weeks from mid-October to mid-May.

There is an interesting wildlife event that coincides with the first fall stocking at Green Valley lakes every year that continues to amaze me. Somehow, the eagles and ospreys seem to have it marked on their calendars that the lakes are scheduled to be stocked, and though they take quite a haul of trout each year, I am always thrilled to see them show their fishing prowess. I stop fishing to watch them fish.

While I love to see the eagles grab fish with their talons as they glide at the surface, I am most impressed with the ospreys and their feet’ first dive into the lake. It seems impossible every time they pull their whole body out of the water with a large trout and fly off.

Each lake is fun to fish and has its own advantages. It seems that fewer people fish Lake 1 especially on the eastern bank, so if I want to have a lake to myself, I will head there. Lake 2 is fun for me as a fly fisher, as I feel I can cast to a large portion of the entire lake since it is the smallest of the three. Lake 3 is the largest lake, and there are several great places to fish on this lake.

I have caught fish along the entire shore in all three lakes, but the big dock, the walls along the south and north shore of Lake 3 and the west bank of Lake 3 are probably the most productive.

Besides trout, the lakes hold largemouth bass, crappies, and bluegills. There are also catfish and grass carp in all three lakes. The daily limit for trout is four fish, and be sure to check the signage at the lake for the regulations on the other species. Anglers need a fishing license that can be obtained online at www.azgfd.gov. Children 9 and under fish for free, and the license for kids ten and older is only $5. License are valid for a full year from purchase.

PowerBait, worms, mealworms, and corn are all great baits for trout. Small spinners, spoons, and small jigs also work well. Fly fishers will often fish with wooly buggers cast out past the drop off, or bead headed wet flies and zebra midges fished under an indictor.

If you choose to release your trout

If you do not intend to keep your trout, please take extra care. Handling trout with a rag will minimize their ability to survive after release, because you have removed some of their protective slime layer. If a trout swallows the hook, do not try to remove it. Instead, hold the fish gently with wet hands and cut the line near the mouth. As long as it isn’t bleeding, the trout will usually swim away and be ready to be caught again by another angler. It is a good idea to carefully release the fish close-by where you can help it if it needs some additional recovery time.

When I fly fish, I use a barbless hook and I try to keep the trout in the net in the water. Often, it will unhook itself and be ready to swim away. If it is not ready, having the fish in the net allows me to monitor it and revive it a bit more by moving the fish back and forth to get water flowing through its gills before it shows me that it is ready to swim off. If the trout still struggles in its recovery, I will gently take it out of the net and hold it in a natural swimming position, moving it back and forth. If that fails, I will keep the fish for dinner.

Are you interested in learning how to fly fish?

October at Green Valley Lake is also a great opportunity to learn how to fly fish. The Payson Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Department will be offering a full day Introduction to Fly Fishing class on Saturday, October 21. I will be teaching this class, and you can sign up at the Parks and Recreation office at Green Valley Park or through their website (www.paysonrimcountry.com). The deadline for enrolling in the class is October 16.

There is a lot of hands-on and discussion time in the class. The first half of the day includes rods, reels, fly fishing equipment, flies, and practice tying important knots. We also discuss effective strategies for fly fishing in lakes and streams. The second half of the day involves casting practice and actually catching fish with a fly rod in the Green Valley lakes. All equipment and flies are provided by the Payson Flycasters Club as part of the class. Participants usually catch their first fish on a fly rod during this class. With trout stocking that week, your first fish on a fly rod could be a trout.

Wildfire near Green Valley tops 1,000 acres

A wildfire north of Green Valley first discovered Monday afternoon has grown to more than 1,000 acres, the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management says.Initially about 25 acres, the Soto Fire grew to about 500 acres by Tuesday afternoon and was just over 1,000 acres by Wednesday. It is about 30 percent contained.Across the SkyBetter weather forecasts? Drones could be the key00:00:00 / 00:36:05Better weather forecasts? Drones could be the keyIn order to predict how the weather will change, ...

A wildfire north of Green Valley first discovered Monday afternoon has grown to more than 1,000 acres, the Arizona Department of Forestry and Fire Management says.

Initially about 25 acres, the Soto Fire grew to about 500 acres by Tuesday afternoon and was just over 1,000 acres by Wednesday. It is about 30 percent contained.

Across the Sky

Better weather forecasts? Drones could be the key

00:00:00 / 00:36:05

Better weather forecasts? Drones could be the key

In order to predict how the weather will change, an accurate picture of what's happening now is needed. While current conditions at the surface are well known thanks to weather stations, there are significant gaps in the data higher up in the atmosphere. Unmanned aerial vehicles, better known as drones, could help fill in those gaps significantly. Dr. Jamey Jacob from Oklahoma State University is leading the charge on bringing drones into the field of meteorology. He joins the podcast this week to talk about what kind of data drones can collect and the advantages they have over weather balloons and airplanes. He also discusses the current limitations and what will be needed before they can be used on a large-scale to improve weather forecasts. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. Check out our sponsor, WeatherCall NexGen! Receive precise, location-specific weather alerts via phone, text, or email. With over a decade of experience, WeatherCall delivers pinpoint accuracy for your exact address, ensuring no surprises. Explore the WeatherCall difference today! Visit: https://weathercallservices.com/lee-enterprises About the Across the Sky podcast A weekly podcast discussing all things weather and climate. The podcast is hosted by the meteorologists of the Lee Weather Team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia.

36:05

Jan 29, 2024

What can be done to reduce weather-related car crashes?

Weather and cars do not get along. Each year, about 21% of car crashes in the United States involve adverse weather conditions, resulting in thousands of injuries and deaths. We can't prevent bad weather, but new technology is being developed to keep drivers safer. Dr. Scott Mackaro, the head of Insights and Innovation for Vaisala Xweather, joins the podcast this week to talk about road weather data. Why is it so difficult for drivers to receive accurate information on road conditions? What can be done to make it more easily accessible? The team also looks ahead to the future and discusses how self-driving cars could be the ultimate key to minimizing weather-related crashes and when that day may come. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast A weekly podcast discussing all things weather and climate. The podcast is hosted by the meteorologists of the Lee Weather Team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. Check out our sponsor, WeatherCall NexGen! Receive precise, location-specific weather alerts via phone, text, or email. With over a decade of experience, WeatherCall delivers pinpoint accuracy for your exact address, ensuring no surprises. Explore the WeatherCall difference today! Visit: https://weathercallservices.com/lee-enterprises

42:03

Jan 24, 2024

2023 was the hottest year on record. What's next?

According to NOAA and NASA, 2023 was the hottest year on record, as greenhouse gases from fossil fuels continue to increase. Renewable energy sources are scaling up, but how fast is the transitioning happening, and what are the roadblocks? Andrew Dessler from Texas A&M joins the team to talk candidly about energy solutions to climate change. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast The weekly weather podcast is hosted on a rotation by the Lee Weather team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

42:03

Jan 15, 2024

Feeling blue? It could be seasonal affective disorder

The month of January is often considered the most depressing of the year. The holidays are over, credit card bills are coming due, and the days are short and cold. While many suffer from the winter blues, for some it's a more serious condition known as seasonal affective disorder or SAD for short. Jasmine Wilson with the Ascension Medical Group joins the podcast this week for an in-depth discussion of SAD and how the weather plays a role in triggering it. She explains the symptoms that are characteristic of SAD, who is most vulnerable, and what treatments are available to overcome it. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast The weekly weather podcast is hosted on a rotation by the Lee Weather team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

35:08

Jan 8, 2024

The 10 biggest weather stories of 2023

2024 has arrived, but we can't start a new year without looking back at the previous year. There was plenty of weather to talk about in 2023. The United States saw a record number of billion-dollar weather disasters, so picking the biggest weather stories of the year was not easy. Ten events stood out to our meteorologists the most though. The team discusses each one from the beginning of the year until the end. From a phenomenal deluge in Florida, unprecedented levels of smoke, to a raging firestorm in Hawaii, the weather in 2023 will not soon be forgotten. We want to hear from you! Have a question for the meteorologists? Call 609-272-7099 and leave a message. You might hear your question and get an answer on a future episode! You can also email questions or comments to podcasts@lee.net. About the Across the Sky podcast The weekly weather podcast is hosted on a rotation by the Lee Weather team: Matt Holiner of Lee Enterprises' Midwest group in Chicago, Kirsten Lang of the Tulsa World in Oklahoma, Joe Martucci of the Press of Atlantic City, N.J., and Sean Sublette of the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

51:39

Jan 2, 2024

Listen now and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | YouTube | RSS Feed | SoundStack | All Of Our Podcasts

State forestry officials initially warned that nearby structures were threatened Tuesday night, according to an update made to X, formerly known as Twitter. But no mention of a danger to structures was included in the most recent updates.

No cause for the wildfire has been given.

Green Valley bite reminder that it's rattler season in Tucson

A Green Valley woman was bitten by a rattlesnake on Wednesday morning, prompting a reminder that the reptiles are active now that spring has sprung.The woman was bitten on her right foot as she walked to her back gate, a news release from the Green Valley Fire District said. The rattlesnake was under a decorative pot and did not rattle as the woman approached, the release said.The woman was hospitalized and was in stable condition.Green Valley says its crews have been responding to about to about 15 to 20 snake-related c...

A Green Valley woman was bitten by a rattlesnake on Wednesday morning, prompting a reminder that the reptiles are active now that spring has sprung.

The woman was bitten on her right foot as she walked to her back gate, a news release from the Green Valley Fire District said. The rattlesnake was under a decorative pot and did not rattle as the woman approached, the release said.

The woman was hospitalized and was in stable condition.

Green Valley says its crews have been responding to about to about 15 to 20 snake-related calls a day.

Listen now and subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Google Podcasts | Spotify | YouTube | RSS Feed | SoundStack | All Of Our Podcasts

To avoid being bitten by a rattlesnake, watch your step when hiking or in your backyard. If you do see a rattlesnake, take one or two steps back in order to try to get out of striking range, the Arizona Daily Star previously reported.

Also, don’t put your hand where you can’t see them and don’t approach or provoke the snakes.

Rattlesnakes are attracted to vital resources such as food, water and a safe place to live. To deter rattlesnakes from staying at your home, eliminating rodents is a good way to start, the Star reported.

A solid wall around four feet high with no tunnels underneath or covering drainage holes is another way to deter rattlesnakes. One-inch openings are open doors for snakes.

If you are bitten, immediately go to a hospital. Cutting into the bite area, trying to suck the venom out, using tourniquets and applying ice are all discouraged, officials have said.

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